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The Dive Bar Rock Star Podcast
The Dive Bar Rock Star Podcast

Episode 17 · 1 year ago

Noriko Olling- Find Your Musical Soulmate (Chaka Khan, Tina Marie, Rick James)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Keyboardist, Noriko Olling, explains how she came to the U.S. from Japan and became a top call keyboard player in Los Angeles. She talks about the joys of living in a recording studio and reveals where the inspiration came from for her newest album, “My Path”. She shares some of her experiences as a woman in an industry dominated by men and what it’s been like working for legendary artists. Noriko also shares some tips on making great charts.

www.norikoolling.com

Noriko on Spotify:

https://open.spotify.com/artist/4gpiKq3p87Km2Oy5b8aVLm?si=yneQYstyQPWJWpgBaOsfUA

Noriko on YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/user/Noriko1595

If you are a fan of the dive bar Rockstar podcast and would like to help support the show, there's a great way that you could do that and start a new fashion trend. We have a new merchandise page on the website, which features t shirts and hoodies that are available for sale on Amazon. Just click on merchandise and the top menu and all of the links will be there. or go directly to dive Bar rockstarcom merchandise. Get started early on your Christmas shopping at dive Bar rockstarcom. Welcome to the dive Bar Rockstar podcast, a show exploring the lives of professional musicians of all types, touring musicians, recording artist, songwriters, engineer's bar bands, wedding bands and anyone making their living in the music industry. Whether you've dreamed of being a professional are you already are one, this is the podcast for you. I'm your host, Eric Baines, and I hope that you not only find some entertainment here, but also some helpful tips, trade secrets and ideas that will help you achieve your dreams. As you heard of the top of the show, kind of excited we've got some merch happening now and it's available on Amazon, but I have a new page on the website called merchandise because I hope we'll add some other things, you know, as things go on. But if you'd like to help out the show a little bit and buy a t shirt, I actually originally just threw the logo of the show on there, but then I realized my name is on it and you know, if you know me, I don't know, might be weird wearing my name on your chest. So there's a version with my name and a version without my name and the Hoodie doesn't have my name. So so if that's weird, then you have both options. Or if you if you really like me that much, then then that's there too. So so check it out and keep looking back because we're going to add stuff as we go I guess today is a dear friend. We've known each other for many years and played hundreds of gigs together. She's a keyboard player, musical director, Singer, songwriter, music producer, educator, chart writer for really big artists. If you've played enough in town, you've probably played charts with her name on it, and she's most recently added video editing to her list of skills. As many of us are doing, but she's getting really good at it. She's got two records on spotify, one's called love potion and the other is my path, and a new single called becoming. And as a keyboard player, she has performed and recorded with some incredible legends in the industry like Chaka Khan, Tina, Marie Rick, James Pink, Gladys night, Aretha Franklin, Jeff Beck, Michael Bolton, just a name a few, and she also played at my wedding. She's awesome and I really hope you dig my conversation with Noriko Oling. I've been watching these videos recently, the Phil Collins Tunes, especially, like you and Chad, your husband. MMM, my very first guest on the show right. Get to talk about that too, Gussie Miller, who I don't know, and Leland scar who's like a huge hero of mine. Ah, so how did all of that happen? Yeah, okay, so this all happened when, you know, the lockdown came and actually I was busy, but our friend Jay Gore, the guitar player, he was bored to death. He just wanted to do something, so he asked both of us, me and my husband, chat who's the Durrammer. He wanted to do a cover song and we didn't know what cover song we're going to do first. As we talked and discussed what song is good, we end ended up deciding to do easy lover feel coll instant, which, chat is a biggest film Collins fant yeah, and I'm actually I never played that song, you know, but anyway. So then Jay says, well, we need a singer who can sing both, both parts. So Jay and Gussie of friends, and actually I have done work with Gussie before. Gotcha. So we asked Gussie to sing lead vocals and he's, of course bored death too, so he said yes. And then Gussie new Leyland got through. You know, she's, you know, really to Marcus Miller and so you know, like he's he's like really well into this industry, knowing a lot of people.

So he lean the was one of his friends. He said, well, can I ask him to play Bass? We're like yeah, please, and then at that time he there weren't much happening for Lee. So she said yes, but Lee had nothing, no gear, no, he has never recorded his base at home before. So did you know, I'm gonna Confess this easy lover. He recorded on garage band. Wow, yeah, but gussie hooked him up with SSL, the you know that, with the company, so he got the interface guys sent to him and wow, well, that's kind of amazing. But garage band is come along way. weirdly. Actually, hello, I'm teaching a class how to produce a pop song on Garage Band my college. That's where I teach. So actually, I'm like been studying garage band. Yeah, so my right, it's not bad and it's not you can do automation, pitch correcting, you know, flex time, you could do a lot. I mean you have a good mic and a good interface and it's the same program it's just, you know, just like lot murders are good. Yeah, and it's free on every cup. It's free. You know, it's so yeah, wow, we've come a long way. Oh Man, and you do. You've done these videos? Or first all you did you edit the video. I didn't at the point of March, and then the church that I'm a musical musical director of, they went to the virtual video service. Oh my gosh, we need to have a music video for that. So I was forcing to video editing and I was either editing on I movie first for maybe like two, three weeks, and then it's just limit it. Yeah, when you have ten different videos clips to right, you know. So I use my educational discount from school. Gota do'll be creative house account. Right. So then I started learning out the we premier who do spen. That's like, you know, the step by step, by step, learning new things every time I do it. New Song. Yeah, yeah, that's not an easy program right. It's not an obvious thing you just pull up and go, oh, I'll make a video. No, but that's the testament to you and just jumping in and being able to do stuff like that right, and pretty easy. Lover, I'm so proud of my work that so many people watched it. I'm so like happy about that that even my mom and Japan. But that's just the we were. We paid such an honor to the actual regional vergin and we try to recreate as close as possible to that. So and then the in the editing process, I would use like slide or page push or little circles circling around the next thing. And then my two sons who watching behind my shoulders. No, mom, you don't do that that's not cool. So they actually helped me to not to use some of the transitions that make the video uncool. That's good. That's good. You gotta the youth in there. Yeah, editing you. That's right. That's awesome. And then the other song another day, paradizing parasites, and what an interesting pick. Like I wouldn't have gone right to that a song. There's so many Phil Collins Songs, but one of my favorite songs. Oh, it did. Oh, yeah, I mean I'm a huge film song a fan as well. Yeah, in fact, last week or this week, the episode that came out yesterday, today's Wednesday. Okay, whenever people are going to listen to this, I don't know, but has George Shelby. It was George Shelby and he just got off the road with Phil, you know. So we talked all about him on the last episode two. So I guess it's tune a row about Phil Collins. Okay, yeah, great music. I yeah, I love that Song. To it it's very monotone, like it realready doesn't have a lot of ups and downs, right, but we try to give a little bit different colors to this one compared to easy love of we we took a little bit more freedom on the production and you're...

...doing all this at your the Temple Studio Complex. Yeah, it's I know, as your house. Yeah, but it's unique. I mean, I guess a lot of people have studios in their houses in la but your house is a studio, like you've kind of turned your like you walk in and it's music everywhere, right, which is kind of it. Is that? Is that you're doing, or is that Chad's doing? I mean, if the first thing you see is a drum set when you walk in the door, you know, is that? Is that? You like that? I Love I love it. But our thirteen year old son the other day, just like couple days or here. What if we just had studio at another location? What would you put here in this room, except instead of drums, like twenty drums and write thirty symbols? Yeah, wow, well, I think it's it's awesome, but it must be cool to be able to list roll out of bed and make a recording. That's right. Everything's accessible, it's all cooked up all the time and you know, it makes it easier to get to work when you have to. Not Yeah, now that we we got green screening, white screen and I got the gray back drop. So just like lights, so like I just video tape myself for my own music video and that's awesome. M Yeah, Chad mentioned that the other day. I talk to him, and that you're doing cameras now and in the whole thing and you know a lot of those videos are from your house to slash. Yeah, yes, only thing, I don't know if you notice on another day in paradise, if you really look at chat drum take in the back there are two weeks which I was doing, done a sum a tribute show, and the girls, the the main singer, she's like I want you to look s can try these weeks. So I put them right there on the month or the top of the anyway, I couldn't take those off of the videos. There there, there skills are very stupid. But ha ha, oh, I don't know. Now we know what they are. Easy with that in the notes on the you know the description. Well, I didn't notice, but now I'm gonna get now I will notice. It's very funny and I'll never not see it again. Unfortunately, then covid is probably been pretty good for business in yes the studios have been busy, which that's great. Yeah, that's kind of great that you have that too, since, Oh, yeah, I don't know what I would have done without that. Yeah, and we're you gigging a lot before this because you've kind of been off the road for a minute. And Teaching, as you were talking about. Yes, I did find so much passionate teaching and Playing Gospel Music and also creating my own music. Right. That's like lifting up people, you know. That's like my purpose. So I found that out. So I I still geek, or I was Gegegg, you know, but not like every weekend. Yeah, so this hasn't been that much of a change for you. Right exact. Up, your kid doesn't go to school now. Right then it gets tired of the US being home. But then we are like, but why are you here all the time? The first time I ever heard you play forty sure, it was on a video tape that a guy named Mike be played for me. Ok, first came to town. Oh my gosh, do you remember him? Yeah, and it's just a weird thing because it's like, I came to town, I'm looking for anything I can get as a Gig, you know, and I was struggling to like find something, and then I think I met him through music and contact me too. Yeah, and he I went in and auditioned and they liked me and they're like here's a videotape of what we do and stuff, and started talking about Nuriko and and and it was like an outdoor show. I don't know, it's not important, but anyways, and it was just really weird than like probably within six months I met you and I was about to go to China for three months. Wow, and I was like man, I've just moved here. Now I'm going to go to China and leave my wife here. And and I was just like Oh, this is he was a cool guy and everything, and it was really fun, great music, big and high energy band. Sounds like cool. But, Mike, I just moved to La I want to be here to network and stuff. And then maybe a week before I was I was like, okay, I'm in and we're leaving in two weeks. I got another Gig,...

...that in town Gig. It didn't paywise much, when I'm like a man, it'll keep me in town. And so anyways, but did you played with him? Did you play with him for a while. Yeah, at least the maybe year, or if not more. We went to Philippines for three month. Yeah, yeah, but we did a lot of gigs up inventora. God, that's where they hut followers. So Friday and Saturday and Sunday night, nine to one. Who those are, were the days I pay my dues. Yeah, and Mike, he was really good with clothing, like he I think he's like can make outfit, you know, like he's you know. So he would get me all these like Zebra print short skirt my I'm pretty short, and the little part, you know, I mean different stuff for me to wear on Stef I really enjoyed that part too. Well, that's cool. HMM. Yeah, the band was great. You know, it wasn't really about the music. I just was like, oh, man, three months, you know. But but you grew up, obviously, in Japan, yes, and studied music there. Studied music. They're all the way, from five years old. I never stop up till I left Japan. I was twenty two. Wow, and did you was at your choice or was that a parents choice? That was according to my mom. I was four years old. She I brought a flyer about a music lesson from from a preschool or some school that I was going to after school program. I brought a flyer asked my mom can I go to this thing, and she said you are so you too little for this. Wait, let's wait a year. So same time the next year, following year, I brought the same flyer and then I told my mom, okay, you said you could go in one ear, so can I go? She said. I was so adamant about not missing lessons. So in a very rainy day or typhoon K I would tell my mom, if you don't take me today, you're gonna do whatever. Thousand Yend I would divide up the month to be tuition into a weekly fee. I don't know how I did that at like six years old, but I did. And Wow, but this this class, I don't know how they did all I remember is we did a lot of sulfage, we sunk right and rhythm, like just the rhythm, clapping just repeatedly, and they trained me and before I knew it I found out I have perfect pitch. I I with maybe like seven or eight wow, I don't know how they did that. Yeah, so it was more of a general music class. It wasn't, or was it? Specie was like a group class, like a rhythm, rhythm and let's sing kind of class at first. Yeah, wow, yeah, I kind of want to talk about perfect pitch. Actually, is that? Is that helpful, or does that bother you sometimes? Like, what is it like live? I'm you know, I've known all of us, know people that have it, but I've never really had the chance to pick apart that scenario. I've wondered. Is that like if you hear? Well, back in the day there would be a cassette tape and if it was a little slow and a little out of tune, does that drive your nuts? Out of tune things drive me nuts. Yes, I dates out of tune string players and players, oh my gosh. Yeah, yeah, I don't like the out of tune. One day spit a spit up the tape. So, like wonder, like Michael Jackson is even have a song like it's nothing, if minor, but it's not if shop mine or either, you know between. Yeah, like that's what I'm talking about. Yes, if bothers me, but you know, can't do anything about that. But right, but you definitely notice because you, even if you don't know a song you can, you'll know what key it's in. Yes, yeah, yes, but don't, don't do that test right now. I got so if the musicians working on the riff, like the little even know, like it's just notes. Come to me. So I just visualize the notes in my head and then I could just play. Wow. So that comes easy for me and that helps me that way now and since you know, you grew up...

...reading music, you can see it all on a page as well. Yeah, see, yeah, that's kind of be an advantage in any situation. And well, one thing, I thought that was normal. You know, in Japan growing up, I was my peers or people that are in my same group less and they could all do that. So for me to find out that that's a special skill, wow, like I didn't know until I got here. Right. Yeah, that's interesting. Yeah, that, you know, there was no way you were not going to be a musician. It's like your genetically, you know, born to be a musician. How that's too bad, right. So what point did you think I gotta go to the US? The going to the US thing? Who? That was? My life was not going well. I was twenty one years or that. I finished my college graduated and I became a teacher, teaching electric organ but it's not from Yamaha. At that point I was hired by taking it on. So like that was made by national okay, yeah, okay. So then I had a lot of students, that forty, maybe fifty students a week. I mean this was every student had thirty minutes lot, and I still remember every Wednesday three, two, nine, no break. Every thirty minute new student come. And what I did was I thought almost every day, and then on the weekend I would go and play for wedding ceremony or wedding party. MMM, so it's like now, but I had no day off, you know, just that. Been Workholic, you know. Yeah, all my life. But wedding, whoo, because I was the one man band. It's not like I was playing with somebody. So I had my base right hand and left under cord and then right hand and the rhythm box could so then I would just play a background music. I would accompany people with this like old Japanese folk song. They want to see whatever song they want to sing, and I had tons of books, so I just pull out the song and then accompany them. It was depressing. Yeah, depressing. So so then I got sick. So I doctor said it was because of the stress. So it was up and Sidis and over the infection happened at the same time on the same side, which was good because then they just pull them, pull it out, you know. But that made me think, what am I doing with my life? Is this? Can I keep doing this, and will I be okay? And then that about the week after that, after I recovered from that surgery, my old piano teacher contacted me. She was coming to Canna Zawa, where I was living, to visit, and that's everything changed, by me seeing her again after years of not seeing her, because she was my teacher when I was in Fifth Grade Catia. Yeah, so then she was the one that had the connection with Steven Seagull. Oh well, and her boyfriend cousin, taught I kido at his Dojo. Huh. And they knew this girl who was already actually in Japan studying tea ceremony and who offered her room to cut, you know, for me to take her room while she was in Japan. Wow. So like this got arranged very quickly. Her Room and in Lah yeah, in law. Yeah, so her parents became my host parents. Huh. So, so the time that I decide. I have six months until I moved and I worked every night. I added plus teaching three to nine o'clock, from nine to midnight. I'm playing at a nightclub wow. Actually Funny Story. My mom was a hostess my Gold Wat I got her the job. After I got the job. They were looking for more hostess and my mom didn't have work. I can I like you want audition or interview, and she got the job because she's only nineteen years older than me...

...and you know she's beautiful, right, but I was told never call her mom. Of course, at the nightclub wow, and I would be accompanying businessman with like oily hair, oh my gosh, and then there's my mom dancing really close so dancing, I'm playing, I'm playing, and we look at each other, we like make faces. Nobody can nobody saw. Wow, you are a true dive, bar rocks. Yes, yeah, wow. Was America like and your sights before that? Did you think that that might be a place you wanted to go, or it just was an opportunity? You jumped? Opportunity to jump I had. I never thought of that, but my piano teacher. When she saw my situation where I'm suffering from this stress and the work not going anywhere, the big like water in front of me, she said, what are you doing in Canna Zaba? Well, she didn't say go to Tokyo. She's a good to Los Angeles. Wow. Yeah, so she arranged everything and I just had to save up like ten grand in six months. HMM. So I worked hard save that because my parents are like we're done. So we're done with you, so we're not paying for this trip. So right, so I left. That was a good move. Do you look back at it? Do you feel like you got lucky, you like, or that was just smart too? I mean you saw that opportunity and just now a little both, I guess. Yeah, yeah, like everything in life. Maybe that's right. It was the path for me, I guess, which is an are your record will get to that. That's okay. So that when you got here, you went to the Grove, didn't you got you went to music school here as well. Right, yes, well, my English sucked. Okay, so I worked a little bit and I went to adults school. Do you know what adults school is like? English for immigrants, right, so, because I only had that much money for the whole time to stay. So I had to be like really, you know, I had to plan how to spend my money. So adult school tuition was fifty cents per ere, ha ha ha, wow, thank you. Thank you. So nine, this was just ten years ago. That okay. So, but yes, that there I met lots of people from El s Ouvador, Mexico, China and then made friends with them, and English was only way to communicate with each other. So, yeah, and and where did you said you were working? Were you playing music or were you know? And I got the job at the fast food restaurant makes like a chicken Terry, Agy Ball. But everything was came from my old teachers connection. So there was this Japanese guy who all in the store and he needed somebody to you know, casher. You know. So, but my English suns I made the customers much so much. The Guy, one guy came in. Do you use MSG? I said, what is it? Miss G? He got he left. Wow. Yeah, and every time I answer the call I didn't know what they were saying. So then I just I didn't even know how to ask. I can you speak slowly or right anyway. Yeah, so how long? So did you have to go back or did you have you just been here since I went back. But so I stayed one year. Oh, you want to get into that part of my story, because I don't know. I do. So there was a guy that I was dating before I came to America, Piano Tuner, sound engineer, seven years older and very nice guy, you know, love the music and so, but anyway, he waited for me the whole time I was my goal was to be here one year, learn English and learn music, whatever I can learn here. So anyway, so after six months of going to adult school, I think maybe three or four months, I started going to grow school or music. So I thought maybe my English is enough, I can stand what's going on in music classes. So I started just taking at like at random, Lee like this class. I know. I took vocal performance, I jazz...

...arrangement. So I just you know, I couldn't take I couldn't be four times to them because I was still working part time at the restaurant. So and then it was when I came in May, was like December. My boyfriend, Japanese boyfriend, came to visit me and I was gonna stay until April, like that was about a one year right. He said, when you come home, you coming home to me. So that was his proposal, marriage proposal, and I felt like I had no place to go back at my home where my parents were. They had sold my piano, they had sold all my instruments of that idleved. I felt like with him I can learn about more business and do my music. So I said yes. So I actually got married at Brown Park in Glendale because he came here and then we got married. Will hire a pastor would marry us, and it's a long, long story. Yeah, but my friend who became my second husband, who is a WHO I met while I was here, who was just a friend while I was course here horse, but she was at my first wedding because he was my friend, right. And you know at the end of the wedding they say like you raise your hand if you get post to this wedding or whatever. You know, the Pastor said he wanted to raise his hand, but he didn't. I didn't know he liked me that way. So, anyway, long story short, he became my second husband. The first marriage didn't work out. What I brought you back here, but the second marriage brought me back here. So if he wasn't for that, I would have stayed in Japan. Actually. Yeah, wow, it's interesting. So that's another like turning point for me, that my second half, a husband, can coming to Japan to see me. Then we got together, we you know, and then my men and I got a divorce and then I actually got pregnant. We had a baby, we got married in Japan. Yeah, and then one year later, about one year later, after baby was one year old, he became severely homesick, depressed, wanting to come home. So that when that was ninety three, so you. Yeah, I was in Japan with for about four years. Yeah, you. So when you got back, what was how did you get started being a musician? What was your first Gig? Yes, musicians contact services, thank God for for that. And I got a recording job with this Italian guy who wanted to record like opera type music. Oh and he needed accompanished five songs. And Anyway he came. He came to rehearse, he came to my apartment to rehearse and he was, let me tell you, he was so bad. The next day all of my neighbors came to ask me what was that? I was like, oh, but it's a job, you know, I gotta do this. Yeah, so I went to the recording studio to it was nice. Recording student in Hollywood was really excited and he was. I was in a control room, I with my keyboard. This Italian guy was in the booth. I could see him, you know, across the room, and he got so excited and happy. Next thing I saw was he peed on the floor. He pee on the floor and in the room, in the vocal booth, I mean the puddle of water. I mean I was like just do your job, you know, I was telling myself, don't it's okay. So the engineer, poor engineer, had to go and clean up the mess and we finished recording all the songs and it was time to get paid. He's like how much did I say I was going to pay you? I'm like sixty dollar. Oh my gosh, what did I do that for sixty songs and rehearsal? I anything...

...or anyway. Then he's I said sixty dollars and I looked at him and I I'm not moving until you pay me. So he takes off his shirt. I was like, Oh what is he doing? There was like a pouch at touched to his like big belly. That's where he got the money out. People in the world going to hear this? Ha Ha oh, I would tell you. I could edit it out, but this is just good. How to keep this? So I think that was my first job through musicians contest services. But he's just got it. It's not just jobs like that. They actually have good job. Wow. Well, I mean you said earlier you paid your dues and you you thought you paid your dudes in Japan. You didn't even. I mean that's paying your dude. That's right. Wow, holy cow. Well, cut to we met. I don't even how to get get from there to hear, but okay, let me get there a little bit in a better way. So instence contact services brought me to Pyn pretty young and Nasty Band, Michael Beats, might be right. Right, right, right. So then I got into the circle UB black musicians and R andb right, that's what let me into meeting you, because right, you know. So that's how we I got into the circle that I met you. Right, yeah, yeah, and that's the next question. Where did all this RMB in jazz come from? Well, you always did you do like as a kid would were you big fans of of rb and jazz and stuff, because it sounds like you were doing all kinds of gigs and then all of a sudden you sort of found it. Well, I was never RMB person until I got tear so, but I always love jazz. Yeah, God, Jazz. My fifth grade it was Lee written our friend roast. That was my song. Okay, yeah, so that said, jazz was always my thing, but RMB wasn't. I didn't know what brick house was. UNTID I got here and they were like you don't know what break houses no, I won't listen to it, you know, and I learned all these songs the years as the years off the years. Yeah, well, that was a probably a great first band to have for that kind of thing because they've did all the standards right. You know. The actually the band that I did instead of that, it was a husband and wife team. They weren't very good, but they had gigs, you know, and they didn't always pay well, but it was money, you know, and it just moved here like, as you know, it's tough and the but the reason I really wanted to do it because they had, they had they used mini discs, so they had tracks, like they were kind of ahead of their time and that. And they use minis, so they had twelve songs per miny Di and they had twelve sets of music. And I looked at all those songs and I'm like this is all the songs that I've seen on all the setlists around town. So they take this Gig, it's going to force me to learn all this material and then I'll be able to work right, because I came from Denver where and I feel like each city sort of has its own vocabulary of songs that bands play. So when I got here I was kind of behind. Denver's more of like a Hippie town and, you know, grateful dead stuff, and I was playing a lot of blues and like even just the cover songs in the top four you band were different than out here. There's a lot of rb all the disco stuff was happening when I got here. This is like all these songs that I needed to catch up on. So he was like, oh well, this will force me to do it because now I have a job. All right. Yeah, so, yeah, so that's probably pretty cool that you, you know a Jazz I think jazz also, rb and Jazz Er really related, right, if you if you had that in your heir, you know in your head those melodies in that vocabulary goes really well with rb. Right, right, that true. That's true. I just had to learn the songs right then I was able to catch up fast. Yeah, MMM, yeah, well, eventually we met. I think I met you at Cafecordia one night and we hit it off and you started calling me and it was great, and then we eventually ended up with ally Woodson. I think was our first sort of major gig. Rightly of the temptations, in the temptations in the S, I guess, kind of the mid s up to the s probably, but that was my first trip to Japan, right to thousand. When was it tooout on too? Yeah, I...

...think that's right. Yeah, so I'd been here like two years, not even year and a half, and that was great. So how did you run into Ali? How did that GIG happen? Okay, so after leaving py in, I started subbing like for different keyboards player around town. That's when I'm at Daryl Crooks, the guitar player who just gigging every day. Yes, different band, you know. So then they'rel really liked my style, the way I played, and he started calling me for work, and so he was ally Woodson's musical directorch at that point. Yes, well, now I think about it, that's that's why I met you, because I had met darrel at Stevie's. I went down to see Derek Edmondson Okay House, the Jam there, and Daryl I'm not sure if he was even in the house bound or if he was just sitting in, but we were all, you know, doing the sit in stuff and and he came up to me too, and there's like, you know, you sound great. And then I went to kavicorialitsy hit squad. Right, that's what I meant you and Chad. Right. So Daryl kind of a big, pretty important guy in your important guy and my story for that matter. Yeah, and one of the most incredible guitar players ever. Right, but he also has a phrase that I've I've never forgotten that I don't want all the chicken, I just want chicken all the time. Yes, and it was like they still say that. But he just keeps on working and it's such a great person to meet. You know, early in my Los Angeles career. Oh, yeah, he is. I mean he you know how, like bird flies, you kind of like put the bird in your hand and then kind of push to the sky to me, like he did that to me. Got You. HMM. Then then he says you're the one that kept flying. I helped you, but you kept flying, which is nice. You know, we just have that mutual like, I guess, love and trust and yeah, yes, so, yeah, and he's still on some of your most recent videos. He is constantly. He's Santa Claus Beard and I know he's upside down glasses. I just he doesn't want the marks on his nose so he put them upside down. Yeah, well, I gotta get him on the show, but it's me. Yeah, you gotta get him on the show. And he will same purple tshirt every week. I said please, this week, can you change because he says it's called Covid I said, do you even shower? So that's what's going on with their own but just the sweetest guy. Yeah, he's an amazing dude and, like I said, like I don't know, me and you and Chad and him as a unit, we just, from the second we started playing was just locked right. mean, like and unfortunately he didn't go to Japan. Artsamoro went on Guitar Right, also great player, but anyways, but we did a lot of those Oli gigs and it was just so much fun because it started as a solo thing. Like when we went to Japan, he we only did like two or three temptation songs and we're doing all of his solo material. Yes, and and at first it seemed really fun. I mean the first time I've ever played with with him it was a grammy party, or like a Pre Grammy Party. Yes, and I just showed up and he's like, okay, who's the new Bass player? Whatever? And then we get done with a show. I mean he wouldn't really I introduce to him, but he's, you know, work in the room and and doing his thing. And and then at the end of the show we're all in the hall and he comes back with his third outfit, by the way, his pre show outfit that he used to mingle. Then he had his show outfit and then he had after show out and he guys and all of them stell our outfits. I don't know, and he literally grabbed me and kissed me that's like, okay, we must have done well. But but then we were Hurst for, if I remember, like probably three weeks, couple times a week leading up to it, and everything was great and it was like the first sound check he comes on stage and just lays into us all about all these stuff we're playing wrong and and it was my first introduction to like Oh, this is this is going to be a bit of a challenge and like, dude, we've been rehearsing, you've been happy and like in your dad was there. I remember and who man he was. So anyways,...

...he was. He was a bit of a challenge. Was Time to time? Yes, yeah, but it was always a lot of fun. Yeah, I have a you know, I we toured like a Germany and HMM, yeah, we had you know, he pushed the drum off the chair and stuff like that. The story. Yeah, yeah, he would. He would like just called called the eventually we had a temptations act, so we had four other guys right, and he would just call them out on stage just we're just be in the back like Oh, don't yell at me. I always I came to enjoy the temptations thing better because there was someone else to yell at me. So, but anyway, he was a great guy. But then we kind of went on to Richard Street and those so those guys. and Richard Street was not the original member of the temptations but came in like well, Papa was, rolling stone was. He was on that record and one grammy's and stuff. But they originally work together. Right, yeah, they like I might one to other and funny story. I asked, Richard, do you have a Christmas album? And and even though that temptations Chris must album that's so famous. That's right, Y men on that right, right. Yeah, he got mad and got my up, me because I had no idea. But he was much more easygoing, you know, still very that whole temptations thing is very strict, very precise. That was kind with they're all known. For Him. It was the truth, you know. It was like almost like being in the military, but Richard was a little more laid back. Oh yeah, and yeah, it's you know, he would tell stories and funny stories. Yeah, you remind me Red Fox. It's like being around staverds on the really, really funny I have to confess something. I love books, but I don't love reading and it's been something that I've wrestled with since I was a kid. You know, I can read. I have read books, but they're very time consuming and I've spent most of my time trying to build a music career it which takes a lot of time. But one thing I definitely do a lot of is drive in La traffic on my way to a Gig, and there's a solution that combines those two situations and that's called audiblecom Ottawa has thousands of audiobook titles and you can listen offline, anywhere, anytime. The APP is free and can be installed on all smartphones and tablets and they have just a ton of music related titles, like you need to know about the music business by Donald has pass man, how music works by David Byrne, or music production secrets by Calvin Carter. And you can get a free thirty day trial right now if you visit audible trialcom dive Bar rock star. That's audible trialcom dive bar rock star. I'd like to take a second to thank you for listening to the dive Bar Rockstar podcast. As a new podcast, getting the word out as a vital part of what it takes to keep the show on the road, or off the road, as the current case. Maybe if you would like to support the podcast, all you gotta do is subscribe wherever you listen and if you have an extra minute or two, please leave a review. You can also share and follow the podcast on your social media APPS. Okay, enough begging. I hope you're having fun and once again, thank you for listening. Eventually, you also worked with Tina Marie and Rick James, but from working with Ali Woodson, I got Tina Murres Gig because somebody saw me. It's was all word of mouth. You know, it's amazing how one job let another job right then Tina Murree's job, let to like Gonad this night and write later. Are you know? It's people. I saw me with Tina and then talk about me. Yeah, and how was I working with Tina? Um, you know, I it was fine. You you know, they were very like all the musicians play by ear. So when I got the show recording there were so many hits, accidents and riffs and of course there's no sheet music to it. Everyone just memorize everything, and so I think they were not expecting me to nail everything at the first rehearsal. But of course I'm like, I wrote every little things out and I made my own book with alternate songs, with the live arrangement. I showed up and I played every single thing and they were like okay,...

...all right, well, I guess we don't need to rehearse tomorrow. So, but Tina just I was amazed of her energy on stage and just just her songwriting. And Yeah, yeah, and songs produced well, the parts, because I had to learn the parts on the record and right, I enjoyed playing them. It's cool. Yeah, yeah, and eventually got chat on that. Yeah, so, you know, we get off the plane from the tour, we go to baggage claim, there's the guy waiting for me and Tenna's okay, that's Oh, yeah, yeah, he's, you know, my think at that time. He my fiancee. And okay, what does he do? Play drums. You know, that's where how it started, right, and then I think that the they didn't have a drummer. The drummer got sick or something. I couldn't rehearse. Chat filled in or something and that was that was it. Yeah, she fell in love. So, yeah, and he eventually became musical director and stuff he did. And then Rick James came in to play. You know he yes, for the last he played on his last few tours. Yep, the reunion tour. Those amazing. Yeah, amazing to just rick showing me all the parts. I mean he remember the parts. He would show me on the keyboard. This is the string line I played. So I would like at that time, did I have iphone? I'm I would like probably either. Like I'm writing out real time as he's playing the part, because I don't remember videotaping him and Voice Memoy, you know, doubt it. Yeah, no, wow. So then he was funny. He was fun and he taught me a lot. So, but he never called me by the right name. He fine, one day was you go and Kumi go and it's okay. Did he come Um ready to work. I mean he's kind of legendary for being yeah, he knew his own stuff. Of course, you know he's own stuff. So thing is, you know, because we had to bring the key down. Oh right, because he's higher register was even though it's hard. You know. So, but sometimes when you change the key on the song, it just doos the brightness of it. Yeah, for sure. The Color Hm, you know, but yeah, we made it work. Yeah, I hate to be dark, but so all these pass passed away and all these people are gone now. You know, it's so sad, sad, so crazy, you know, to me, like they they went too young. Yeah, yeah, yeah, Antinuari, that was a shocker. She was my age, like fifty four, fifty five one. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I was in Russia when Richard died and I was out there for like five weeks and, you know, could make a funeral, but that one, that one hit me pretty hard. I still miss playing with him. Temptations Book. Anyways, it's so much fun and we did a lot of gigs with him and we recorded and then at some point he couldn't afford to take a band all the time and we recorded the tracks that he used, you know, live and right. We're pretty invested in that GIG. Yeah, we bar good times. And you also played with Shaka Khan in that time as well. Chucko got first GIG with Chaco is two thousand and one. Oh Wow. And I had to go in with no rehearsal. I mean just that they sent me the live recording. HMM, so I just had to go in be ready to play. Yeah, that was ner working and it's still happens. I was with her Saturday, this past Saturday, with Chaka oh wow. Yeah, she's doing a live streaming special concert that's coming up in a couple weeks. So we were hers whole week, Wow, and she showed up only on the last day because we were we recorded our rehearsal, you know, recording just the band every day. As we progressed got better, we tighten up things so she would get the recording. So she's like, okay, I know what they're doing. She showed up for a couple hours at the very end and she just sunk down all the seventh song, you like so Ungo, and she laughed. But still, when I'm with her in that rehearsal room, I'm like, am I with Chaka Khan? Like is that really like? I don't know, like what she makes me feel like. So...

...just excited and like this must be a dream kind of feeling. Yeah, that's cool. So she easy to work with this. Yeah, down to Earth and you know that's great. thicky about the parts and stuff. Is She know? She she really let the musical director, who is Melvin Lee Davis. She lets him handle it, which means Melvin says what, I only hire people who knows what they're doing. And he said, I trust you to create parts. If there is no parts in the original recording, you just create your own thing. So that's what I did on these songs, like three or four of them. It would her old songs where there's only guitar, drums and Bass on the truck. Right. So I created I add like or get, you know whatever song. I think that this can add more. So right then Mel Mel said great, so there was no like. He didn't say like don't do this or don't do that, and Chaka not saying she's like sound great, wow, that's great. That's interesting you bring that up, because that's one of the things that I love the most about working with you and Chad and kind of everybody in that circle. Is that. And in you just explained to like we all sort of we do our homework right. We show up prepared, you know, and and that's surprisingly not everybody in town does that on the level that I think we do it. You know what I mean? Like yeah, I'm I want to show up to the rehearsal ready to go for a show. Right, I mean right, and it was so nice to meet you guys with all that same philosophy, because what you can accomplish is so great when you have everybody on the same page. All right, everyone showing up and like you chart everything out, you know, and it's a really where do you think that came from for you? Um, well, really that's already was there, even when I was a little girl, like I would show up to my piano lesson or something, I would be prepared, you know. So that's just the mindset that I had. Well, I guess very Japanese, maybe Asian, I'm not yeah, and maybe music school in general. Yeah, studied musician, because it's definitely something I had to kind of pick up. You know, along the way. Somebody was like, well, it was Nelson Ranjel. I used to play Sax Player, Nelson Ranjel, right, one time we backed up chuck lobe. Right, yeah, remember that? You over here? Yeah, yeah, like maybe two years ago now, and I just remember Nelson talking about like we're going to go in and we're going to nail this thing, you know, and like do your homework and and I was never like not prepared. But there's a difference between, yeah, I kind of listen to the tunes, I pretty much know what it is, and and being ready to do a show right, you know what I mean. So I don't know, I think I've that would dea didn't come as natural to me, but now I couldn't. If I'm on my way the GIG and I don't know a song, I don't care what the GIG is, I'm freaking out, you know, like right, yeah, but then, like Allie Woodson, Foo would throw a new song, yeah, like maybe forty five minutes before the show time, and I still remember like I had to chat out a song and then go find the copy machine, you know, and then okay, this is this is the drum groove, this is a basic groove. Let's do it. You know, man, you got well, the my very last Gig with Ali was at Stevie's, which is no longer. There's a club and Proceda and we were all playing and there was a lot of things about that gay that was just tough, you know what I mean, and it was really fun, like like you guys made it in. The music itself made it so worth it, but there was a lot to deal with, you know, I think at that that night, I they had charged my my wife at the time, Twenty Five Bucks, the twenty five cover to get in to see us. So I was already like, Dude, I'm not doing this anymore, you know. And but he called some song that I'd never heard, some older you know, and I'm a white guy, for people that don't know me, I didn't grow up in this you know, like you didn't. So he called something old from the s and and Daryl knew it. So Darrel starts playing the bassline and I start okay, and I'm just watching Daryl and we're going and scroovings funky. It's great, and Ali comes back, takes my bass off of me right starts playing the bass and goes up to the front with it and I was just standleft, standing there, you know, looking like an idiot, and I was just like man, and I just remember when he came back and he put it back, he kind...

...of smiled a little like like he knew that. I think. I don't think I was playing it wrong, which is the way I took it, but after he kind of smiled and I was like, I think he just wanted to show off that he could play the bass, right, you know what I mean, and so I sort of like okay, you know, and it it just didn't I don't know that I necessarily quit the GIG after that, but it just worked out that I wasn't available, you know what I mean. You know, it wasn't like this big dramatic thing, but at the time I was just like, oh no, you didn't. You know, like that's just the kind of stuff he would do. But that there was a he called some song on stage like and we just vamped right into it and luckily darrel knew it and I was like okay, but anyways, yeah, so, no matter how so it's. Your point is, no matter how prepared you are sometimes, but like stuff like that, I think like I've been trained. I can known the song in two minutes if I have to write. There were case I was audition pianist for this theater. Okay, so people show up. I had to play for like forty people in one day. I could they show up, show up, show they all bring the sheet music. Right, it's for musical theater thing. But this one guy, he said I couldn't find a shit music to the song that I want to sing. So I said, okay, can I hear it? So I wrote down the whole verse, Chorus, Pre Chorus change and then learn the groove in maybe like two three minutes and then okay, we could do it. And everyone looked at me. I Oh, you know, but these things it's just like I'm yeah, I can just handle yeah, situation. Yeah, because you're Badass. Okay, you said it. You also played with pink like really early on. Think, yes, career, when she her first album, the baby face production. Yes, we did a TV show in Florida and all girl band. Oh, yes, did you have the audition for that or how did that know? Basse player who put the band together knew me and she wanted me to do it. So, Yep, that was that was fun. That was fun. Cat dyson play guitar. Yeah, I forgot. The drummer was from Philly, so it was. She wasn't from La. But Gail Johnson played keep. Yeah, robbing round to read the Bass player who got me the Gig, got at you, who I'm forever grateful. Right, not just got me the GIG, but she and through Dus to meet the chats. Yes, yeah, she's great. Yeah, did it feel like she was pink was going to be one of the biggest stars of her generation. At the time that you were playing with her, I was very impressed with her ability to sing. Yeah, and the soulfulness. I mean not just be able to belt high note, but her phrasing is a soulfulness. And but I was astonished to see her going becoming rock seeing I just like going different direction, because I thought she was going to just stick to the R andb. More RB. Right. Thank yeah, soul if you have baby face producing your stuff, that's right. Yeah, but I mean the rest of his history. She obviously did pretty well with the with the rock thing so well, and she's an interesting even today, like an interesting combination of that rock and RB. I don't think she ever really fully left the RB. She just sort of introduced the rock to it, into it. I see, you can look at it that way. You've also play, you mentioned gladys night, or Reada Franklin, and you've had this career that's you've played with all these amazing women and even had an all girl band for a while on Gaza. HMM, and it's just seems like you've always been really support of women. Has it been hard as a woman. HMM, in the in the Van Ride, you know, oh my gosh, is what guys want to talk about. I've I just put the ear plugs. I don't want to dissent. But Anyway, that's not joke. That's that's the truth. But but um, as a woman, I had the hard time. Is Sometimes when I'm a music or director and then the male musicians don't want to take my, you know, lead. They just don't want to listen or can't give me what they really need from them. So not all of...

...them, just right some cases. Yeah, right. And do you prefer working for a female artist versus a male artist? Or's there's Oh no, no, it doesn't matter, doesn't it doesn't matter. You've been in this business a while, you know, and back before me too, and you know and it's a it's an interesting and even just putting on this podcast, like just you know, there's more and more women now in music, but it's still mostly dudes. You know, I mean right, and it's you. Do you think it's getting better? I mean, like I said, it's I had situation where I had to room with a guy. Wow, was forced into it and that's not cool. And he was cold at three am. She woke me up because he was cold. But Anyway, yes, I have a deal with stuff like that and but yeah, I kept my integrity and just kind of a stage strong through it and I think we could do it. Yeah, you also work for another pretty strong woman and like well, actually, when we talked first about there was a band called clockwork, Friends of ours, Gary Patrick, Kim Wimmer, Jean Siegel, Chad was in it, Jimmy Keakan and you played sometimes. And yes, and we had this great Gig in Vegas. At least I thought it was great. I don't think you liked Vegas so much. Well, Um, I did enjoy the GIG very much, though. Yeah, yeah, it's good to lazy. Looks Good. Yeah, great voices, a great harmony. Everyone could sing. They're great solo singers, you know. Yeah, yeah, it was really cool, but the one day was harmony. It sounded like a record. Yeah, yeah, yeah, I really enjoy that GIG. But but the event, eventually they were like you got to move to Vegas because they were putting us up, you know, at the worry, never rage, you know, every we probably three weeks out of the month if we wanted to. I mean I would say about Chad. It's about you. It's about but eventually we're like, we're not putting up anymore, you got to move to Vegas if you want to keep the GIG. And Me and Chad at that point where like no, I'm not ready to move to Vegas, not knowing what the heck was going to happen, right, and then along comes billy miles and saves the day, right, you know, for me anyway. Yes, I was like, I don't know what's gonna Happen, but I'm just gonna go back to La and we're going to figure it out, you know. And then that became the next year was mostly playing with her and couples. I was playing Keke go at the time. It's right, but, but, and that's so how did that? How did you meet Billy Sho she was a what would you call it? It was basically RMB, but it's kind of had this trip hop thing to get it. Yeah, very pretty cool record. Yeah, and she had a really billy holiday sort of voice, very unique voice. Unique voice. How do you love it or you don't? You know, pross be kind of yeah. So how did you meet her? You know, I know I met her through a friend of mine, but then, not now, if I think about it, I just can't remember. But I had already known her for a why at that point. So, yeah, she was realty young when I met her. God, in her maybe very early S or maybe teen. Yeah, and you're the musical director on that, and that was amazing. They trust it me on. Oh, yeah, Nike Weil, Nike what I'm sure, and I'm well, NI quote, a new Andre and Keith got you the billys producers, and I think that's where got youall. Niche else, another singer that we I played some a lot of gigs with. I don't know about a lot, but she wouldn't play all that often. But right, another guy. We all she used to do some gigs. But yeah, she's from Colorado as well. Yeah, from a rival High School of mine. Oh, I don't know if I want to talk to about that's interesting because it that's also the only Gig that I've ever had the honor of being fired from. Yes, I fire them, I mean I find you, not just you but my husband and my brother in law. Yeah, we're fired for about an hour and a half and I think, well, I got a nice phone call from the manager. Yeah, you just you complained too much, you know. Well, I just remember is getting this huge fight in the van over like we didn't really finish the sound check and they were always about just open the doors...

...on time and I was like, you know, you can push the doors a little bit if you have to, and that's kind of all it started, and it just turned into this huge I think it was like towards the end of a long run of grumpy people. Yeah, yeah, right, at that point, maybe we had been touring for a couple weeks or I'm not sure. I don't remember exactly. Yeah. Well, let's talk about your records, because I listened to love pushing today as a I had to listen to it twice, even I haven't heard it for so many years, and we played some of those records, and I mean some of those songs we've played like, Oh man, just brought back so many memories. Oh yes, such a great record. Where did you record that? My friend, actually billy's producer at that time, jeeve. He's name is Jeeve, he's a guitar player, but producing, and I turned to remember Jeeves last name, but he's still producing and doing well. That's how I also like worked on Cubas with Jeeve and he was just his genius, you know. So he great, great that mixing. But on Dominos, this is the first song on the record. He was as as we were listening to the song, he would do like like he's like doing with his voice. Someone like fields interesting. So that's what we call the vocal facts. And he's on the record. Ha Ha. Yeah, yeah, just great ideas. And and he produced, produced it. No, I actually got all the songs recorded elsewhere and then brought him the truck, got you and then he just kind of he recorded me at his studio, though. Guy. Yeah, it's down, like it's falling down, like don't mean so. And did you write all the lyrics? Billy Miles? Oh, yeah, four songs I think she wrote. Yeah, she helped me so much. Yeah, yeah, the lyrics. There's a couple of tunes are just really clever. MMM good. So do you still like Tequila? I still like to Quilla, I mean not to drink, but I like the song. Yeah, yeah, that's every that's a super class but I did drink tequila in it's a twin. I was in Philippines with Pyn and I got drunk. Everything turned orange. So that's where the song came from. God, you yeah, that's funny. HMM. And here were some of your influences. Then it's a very jazzy it's kind of smooth jazz, but it's, Oh yeah, I listened to of course, chat there and Basha. Oh Yeah, I listened. I'm being all the jazz records I listened to to, but also I need to Baker, you know. HMM, some R and B but I knew I couldn't be her, so I had to find the right range for the song, for the my voice. And MMM, yeah, yeah, because you sing the whole record except for one is that right? One Song that was just scauting right. But then the one song was in Japanese. Yeah, which people love. That song's super cool. Just, yeah, I had I didn't imagine, but I like it. I can imagine. Now I see you in well, your most recent record. It's called my path. Yes, seventeen years later. What why, I asked myself. It took me that long to find actually who I am? I guess I don't know. It's I've written many songs in between. Nothing got nothing got released. Right, yes, yeah, I remember playing on a couple. Yeah, that's interesting. Well, I mean sometimes that's just...

...what it takes, right. Yeah, and this record you don't sing anything. You maybe sing some backups. I Sung backups. Yeah, and I just got I thought I could hear you back there. Yeah. Well, after love potion I had the very kind of discouraging, you know, comments from people my accent. I will never make it in America with my accent. And I can you know, I can hear it, you know, when I hear myself singing. Although some people like my voice, the way that I approach things, and those songs are really nicely written for my voice. But the songs on my past the new album really are not written for my voice. They were written more specifically to so for, I guess, black voice. Some songs are targeted more simpler. Maybe I don't want to distinguish by color, right, but like if you compare you know, Tasha cobs and and then will songs united, I mean it's clearly it's a different tone and approaching their music that I wanted both world in my album. So I would pick a singer who could sing that particular style that I had. Right. Well, sounds great when you picked all good singers. That's a good thing, yes, and how I'm going to take you to write all that stuff. And so first time I wrote from that CD was called forgiveness song and I was studying this book called the past two wealth and it's not really just money, but the wealth to be wealthy with health, to like, you know, it's like to be wealthy. It's not just being rich, right. So then in the back of the book there was a forgiveness prayer that if there is someone in present or a past that I need to forgive now, I do so. And so the prayer was in the buck of the page and I was supposed to say that prayer every night at that time. This was part of the workshop, right. So I'm like, okay, I wouldn't be good about this. So then I was saying it, saying it night after night, and then one day, like if there's some like, the melody came. I'm like, Oh, what if this was a song? Then it's easier to just say it, you know, right, don't just you know. So Anyway, Um, I wrote that song first and May mccatty, who wrote that book, came to my church to to do a workshop and I presented the song. She's just boring with tears because she had no idea I was going to present that song with her prayer, the same words. I took her words and then made it into song. So after that that book inspired me so much that I wanted to write more positive music. So that's how my path started, from forgiving a song and then it took about the year. Wow, yeah, that's great. Yeah, so it's a truly inspired record. Yes, and I thunk than me mccuttie every day, because if we wasn't for her book, with without that prayer, that, then there's no my path. So and it's it's a contemporary, jazzy Christian record. Right. It's definitely a church record, which is different from your other records to yes, so, as Christianity always been a part of your your life is long ground. I just got baptized. That was February of two thousand and eighteen. Oh, got you. Yeah, right, it. But this was spiritual baptism. So where I got baptized there's no water. I don't Dunk my body in the water. Right, this is more spiritual baptism. So where the ceremony, everyone in the church made a big circle and I was in the middle of the circle, which I still don't forget, like that moment, of how I felt. So I wrote a song which is gonna be on my path two album nice, called new beginning, and it's never too late to begin again. That's what the song is about, because I felt like I begun that day now in the kind of a new way, and it's not like it's more universe, higher being that you know. HMM, I'm talking about right.

Yes, got you. Yeah, interesting stature. This is. Can you say? We've done a lot of church together as well. Yeah, I drug you into it. Yes and no. I mean I've done them my whole life. Okay, ours, especially if you like R Being Gospel. There's just no better place to do it. That's right. And then a church right now, and it's it's an interesting also, I mean this podcast is kind of about the working musician, and church gigs are another super I don't want to say it's super lucrative. They're not. They don't always pay that well, but it's another way of making money as well as yes, you know. And and it's interesting because I'm not necessarily a Christian, but I do enjoy playing a church GIG. You know, I mean and and you're saying that you're just now sort of coming a Christianity. So being sort of a non Christian and playing those church gigs, you think that's appropriate? Do you think that's I always feel a little weird about it. How about that, knowing that, you know, but they're paying me money and I'm making their church sound great, you know, and I don't know you any thoughts about that. I wouldn't really worry about it. Like how I was. It was just a paid at got first right, and then they actually transformed me, you know, to betterm be I'd say, HMM, so that could top on two. So I would just let the job of con jobs calm and do it well. MMM. And if that's all what it is, then that's God. Won't be mad nice. Yes, yeah, and it's got a good the only drag is that it's early in the morning. For me, that's not that's not a good thing. But it's so much better than playing a nightclub to you know, and sometimes it pays more, right, you know, and we've done some pretty NLA. In La there's like phenomenal musicians, right, really a fun yeah, you know, I've learned so much, especially when I mean situation like faith for Central Bible Church, where I'm the OAS keyboard player and I get to hear all these World Class Gospel players playing, looking at each other, giving hands signal where they are going next, right, and Oh that signal means going there. Okay, like I, you know, I had to come along way to know where they're going and just follow, be able to follow. So that taught that trained me very well. Yeah, as a musician to write. Yeah, because a lot of times in La I think it's mostly charts and stuff, but a lot of times it's not. Not of times people just know those songs. Right, church, right. I know there's a whole other vocabulary right that you have to have. Yeah, see those guys do it. It's and be a part of it. It's so amazing. I remember the first time I played the Black Church and Denver I was I just had this weird moment because anytime I had gone to church as a kid it was be quiet, listen, clap once in a while, sometimes don't clap, you know, and I remembers I'm just standing on stage playing the funkiest groove I'd ever played all right, loud, so loud, you know, and just being like, I'm in church right now. This is you know, it's some of the best music, right man. Well, music is best. Yeah, really. Yeah, so it's cool that you've you found your thing. Yes, I have record. Like I said, it sounds great. Songs are awesome and even the the other ones seventeen years ago with the Nice thing is now there's spotify and everything's out forever. So people should still go and listen to it and get you some spins and you get your your two cents on on your BMI. Yeah, and you know, Love Potion on one I was I don't want to Saut with that bad girl, but you know, I have my you know, I was like thirty three one love Pohan came out. I was, yeah, peek of my womanhood. Okay, I mean, yeah, look at the cover. Okay.

So, anyway, and the my path is more like I'm a mom, I'm a wife, I'm even the know, more established and as an artist to found my purpose. It's just a different maturity and different, I guess, message. So right, very contrasting to me. Yeah, and you had a new single to be becoming, Oh yeah, becoming Oh, that's that's really beautiful. Oh, thank you. Thank you. And Jade Moya, the the featured singer, on becoming I met her through my school. She's my former student, you know. That's why I told Jade. I said I didn't okay, I had the one point where I could have gotten beyonces GIG. Okay, I auditioned, I knew the musical director, but I was pregnant with my second son and ended up didn't want to burn bridges to get to New York to for the call back anyway. So I gave up that opportunity and I have my baby. I gave up more gigs, more to our gigs, because of raising, you know, my son. And I told Jade, I said it was all that all happened because I can meet you. Yeah, that's cool. So jade came to my life and she, or I had was coming that like some like lines, and then she took it in. That's what it became. So wow. Well, it's beautiful. I listened to that one a few times. Yeah, thank you. Trance to a place this part waiting, to the heart of the other thing that you do to make money in this town is you're like the biggest chart writer for everybody right, writing charts. Mixed emotions about that now that they found out they took my extra and I have a cricket to get spine. And lots of that also coming from playing piano and being tense on my shoulder and look neck, being forward, but a lot of that also come from using mouse and being at the computer. Wow, and charge. The job intense. I just want to tell you how intense it is to transcribe music like one bar at the time. Listen, write it down, listen and write it down, listen again, listen again, listen again. If I can't hear it, slow it down, change the OCTO because the base is too low. I can't hear the base, like. Okay, bring it oct up, up, listen again, write it down. So in that process, the brain power that's us in a process is just tremendous power and tiring and you know the so it's a very special scale. And this is what my mom said couple days ago. You just need to charge more for you. I BA BA BA BAB my Mama. She's always getting mad at how I conduct my business. But okay, you can cut this part or no, she won't understand because she's an understand English but so. But that said, people underestimate charge job and they always try to kind of cut corner, likes to pay less than what really it's worth. So I've been really having a hard time like how I can make this part of my business grow. But just to give you the idea of how much...

...charge job I've done so many for some specialist, most jug artists. So when my husband went to Texas to play a GIG, there were musicians from Texas that were hired just for you know, Keyboard Player, Guitar Player, and then the artist only took my husband to play drums. Right. So they're in a van going to GIG and they're like, oh, yeah, this this guy in no Rico's he does really good charts. You know, we like his charts, and then my husband's like, no, Rico, that's my wife. So like stuff like that happens. Yeah, so I have built a reputation of like good, no recals, charts, no train wreck. Right, yeah, right, absolutely. So, yeah, maybe I should just teach how to write charge the people, because it's time, you know, to do a zoom class so that everyone can pay little bit money, like ten fifteen dollars for like an hour zoom class. Yeah, well, I wish you would, because it's definitely something that drives me nuts, you know, like dust. Your charts awesome. I think we come from the same ideas of what I mean. To me, it's like writing a chart should be easy as possible to communicate the music right, and like there's a simple things you can do to make a chart easier to read. I you know, I'm not can't think of any off the top of my head, but well, just some like, you know, don't put a repeat that goes back three pages, you know, right, you know, showy with ipot. Yeah, exactly. But so I just think that there's a lot of people that get into chart writing in there they want to be seen as smart about it, versus keep it simple, right, keep it is. It should only be as hard to read as it has to be, right, you know what I mean? Yeah, don't make it harder, you know. So I've always enjoyed your charts, sank, so I think the world would be given a great service if you would teach them out of right. Sure, okay, so one one, a tip. So if you want to ever use DS, HMM, I try not to, but only I only use ds if ds is going back to the same page, like top over that same page. M Then I use it because just right, eliminate more paper. Right, but then again, who use paper now? So, yeah, and as your style changed since now there's no bad. Yes, I really like try to be IPAD friendly, charmed, which I have to think about. First ending a coming and first then in going to the second page. Then you got to go back for going back to the page before. No, right, I can't do that. Yeah, then don't use first ending. Just write it out. Keep going. Right. So repeats anymore? Right, you're or I don't do it. Like repeat three times? No, sometimes, if it people forget to count. Yeah, so, sometimes I repeat twelve times. And what? You gotta BE KIDDING? No, right, this is lazy chart writing, right, which is another thing that drives me out to like, don't put you if you are using a first and second ending, make sure that when you repeat it's the same thing. Right, you know. Or if it's different, if there's a stop on the first bar, maybe that's not such a big deal. You can write it second time. But I don't have to read words. Yes, just cut and paste just right, rite the second verses kind and paste. Yeah, it's mostly laziness that makes a bad chart. Would write, and I understand some people want to try to make it fit into pages. Yes, for sure, and I always try to do but then two pages that with a train wreck, or four pages and not train right, smooth exactly, rehearsal time cutting half. You know what I mean. So that's you and you kind of said it earlier, but when you start to you get a new Gig, the first thing you do is you just chart it out if they don't already have charts. Like if somebody says, here's my CD were you know we're doing a show in two weeks. Yes, I charted out, but start defends. Okay, if I'm charting off for everyone in the band and if it's a pay situation, then I write down the base part. I'd write down or if I'm a musical director, then I'd write down other people as part in that in my chart. But if it's just for me, then it would be just a chart for me that my part is written. Yeah, yeah, so it's simpler and yeah, right, but you would you ever just memorize a show? Not before I going in, but by doing it, I just know it...

...after a while. But but it was generally he would chart it out first, then memory. Yes, got you. Yeah, yeah, it's helpful, especially if you have a sub then yeah, right. So, yeah, for someone who didn't really dream of coming here and doing all this, I think your life and career has been astonishing. Like, did you ever think that this was how everything was going to turn out? HMM, no, and I still feel like, though, I'm not there yet in the many ways. But I haven't played stevie wonder yet and Michael Jackson, which were never better to play for. But yeah, I feel like I need to climb up more, you know. But then I need to be smart too. I want to be able to share what I have learned. So I have to find a way to like, you know, doing the zoom class for charting. You know, I have to be clever about coming up. It's different output to share my knowledge. Yeah, younger people. Yeah, yeah, it's literally why I wanted to do a podcast, because I'm too lazy to write a book. Nah, what this can become a book and exactly now you documenting. So yeah, lastly, I just wanna say that magic, that happens when you find the people that when you play together and sometimes you want something, but you don't need to say anything and then it's there. It could be the same simple symbol. Ohhit, yeah, but I don't have to ask, you know, like and then when I hear that, I'm like, Whoa, how did you know? You didn't. That happens a lot with, you know, my husband, Chad, and do you. You know, like the fields and the riffs and when you dynamically go down like you just we don't need to really say or ask. You know, I suggest these young people like to find like so mate, but thing the music. Yeah, bands, situation like that, and to make music with it's yeah, that's so interesting as it it's what I call chat all the time. He's like my drum and bass soul mate, you know. But you're on that list, like the four of us, I feel like, and we haven't played in so long, you know. I hope that the four of us, including Darrell, you know, but we sit there. I would a week. So, I mean it comes to our house and maybe great to get a gem together and record it and put it out on this podcast. You know. Oh, yes, I'd really love to do. Okay, you know. So maybe I'll call it darryl see if he can come do the next week's show and then we've all been on the show, you've all told your story, and then we'll get together at your place and celebrate the Temple Studio Complex and you know, now use it. It did video. Yeah, that'd be amazing. Yeah. So, well, I really appreciate you coming on. Okay, awesome, and it's always good to see you because we don't get to see each other, not very much. It is not as much as we want. So do you think that you'll be like when you say you have more stuff to do with that? Would you be into going back on the road and and doing the like? If stevie wonder did call and he's like, I got a year tour now they hi. Your son is kind of getting older. Is that something you would ever want to do again, or only because he's certain he's going into the tender age? Yeah, right now he needs me to make a mad nice snack I've been making. Yesterday I'm made too big on sandwiches at you definite thirty PM and I'm like, who's going to make this? Sun It is when I go there go. He's thirty. I can make a sandwich. That's what chats it. Well, it sounds like the cricket got in on the action again. He's a nice cricket, but he's kind of a ham, so I apologize about that. I love the story about her coming into Teina, maries rehearsal with everything charted out, and you can probably check out the live show on Youtube. It was really intense. I actually audition for that GIG and had to learn a bunch of tunes and she said very nice things about my bass playing, for sure, but I didn't get the GIG. But at any rate it was just another story about how doing your homework and going the extra mile really can pay off. You know, she did that Gig for quite a long time. She also...

...has a situation that that I kind of have in common. When I go into into some gigs as well, or she's, people see her as the sweet innocent Japanese girl and then she starts playing and just blows their minds, you know, because she's really good. And you know, sometimes I come across the same way. I'm a white guy from the suburbs and no one expects me to start playing RMB and doing it right, you know what I mean. But I feel like it's been a really for one, it's fun to see people's faces change when you start to play and to kind of prove them wrong, but it's also cool because it leaves an impression. So I think it's in the long run it's helped because, oh, that's the that's the white guy that that plays really funky, or that's the the Japanese girl who can play anything and sings like a bird. So if you're out there, don't feel insecure about yourself, you know what I mean, and because ultimately it'll it'll make you memorable. I mentioned Darryl Crooks and his his mantra of I don't want all the chicken, I just want chicken all the time, and I think there was a really good lesson to learn when I got here, because it's, you know, it's sometimes it's better to be shooting for that steady income and just to keep life going and keeping out a comfortable thing and and let the money come if it's going to come, because if you're just shooting for the milliondollar GIG and you're turning down everything else, it may never happen or it may take ten years before that happens and and you can. There's definitely a level of just steady income that that you can achieve pretty you know, pretty quickly when you come to a town the size of all day. The other thing that was really cool about the four of us at the time is I thought of us as like an Alliance on survivor, on the show survivor, where we always had each other's backs and if I need a drummer, I would call chat if I need to keep her player, I call Nerikof Neur Eco. Had A GIG and they needed a base players, you call me and and Daryl in the mix, and it really helped us all stay afloat and and we could also offer ourselves as a rhythm section, where as a band two different artists and whoever kind of got the gig would be the MD of the situation. And so when you're going into a new town and you you're you're trying to network and stuff, I mean that is something to kind of keep in mind, is can you align yourself with some other players and put together a situation where everyone's looking for work and everyone's trying to keep everybody working and of course, over time we all kind of got bigger gigs or whatever, and a darrel was always playing big gigs, but we were we were all. You know. Eventually life and work separated us, but it really helped us get our careers going and and it lasted for for quite a long time. The school that near Eko teaches out is AMEDA Amda college of the Performing Arts in Los Angeles. And Ali Woodson was with the temptations from eighty four tod and eighty six and then eighty eight to ninety six, and that Gig kick my butt a little bit because of the singing and playing, because it was me and Neuriko and Art Samora covering all the temptation stuff. I was like, yeah, I'm a singing bass player. Oh yeah, here's the temptations. Cover all those singing parts and play all those bass lines. So it was quite a good experience and good for my playing. and Richard Street was with the tempts from one thousand nine hundred and seventy one to d ninety three and he was also a member of the distance, which was a group that Otis Williams was in before the temptations were a thing, and he sang lead on. Papa was a rolling stone and masterpiece, and a few others and that one Richard, a bunch of grammys. Well, I really hope that you enjoyed the conversation today. Star. Wow, you've made it to the end. I'm hoping it's because you completely enjoyed yourself and are now filled with knowledge and inspiration to move forward with your dreams. If that is the case, and you would like to stay informed of new episodes, live events in general news, please go to dive Bar Rock starcom and sign up for the mailing list. If you have any questions, comments, corrections or complaints about anything you here on the show, please email me at fan mail at dive Bar Rockstarcom and you may even end up on the show. We at the dive Bar Rockstar podcast with all of our hearts. Thank you for listening and remember, it's all about dreams.

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