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The Dive Bar Rock Star Podcast
The Dive Bar Rock Star Podcast

Episode 5 · 1 year ago

Lucas Grabeel- Hey, Kid! You Should Be In The Pictures! (High School Musical, Switched At Birth, Pinky Malinky)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Actor/singer/songwriter/musician, Lucas Grabeel, talks about his musical journey to stardom. From his early days in local musical theater to writing music for tv and film. He reminisces about making the High School Musical movies as well as the tour and how that changed his life. Lucas opens up about some of the hard lessons he’s learned in both his acting life and his musical life. He also tells the story of being “discovered” in Los Angeles.

Follow Lucas at:

https://www.instagram.com/MrGrabeel/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcTGXtWtJj5UOxDFSAKFZtw

Social Distance

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ksVjwOP1-Q

All The Things

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uoNAVRheXsw

Beautiful Day

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nG1yMDpBGVg

Do you love audio books? You can get a free thirty day trial membership to audiblecom by visiting audible trialcom, dive Bar Rock Star. They have thousands of audiobook titles, as well as podcast guided wellness programs, theatrical performances, a list comedy and exclusive audible originals you won't find anywhere else. Get your free trial membership at Audible Trialcom, dive Bar Rock Star. Welcome to the dive, Bar Rockstar podcast, a show exploring the lives of professional musicians of all types, touring musicians, recording artist, songwriters, engineer's bar bands, wedding bands and anyone making their living in the music industry. Whether you've dreamed of being a professional or you already are one, this is the podcast for you. I'm your host, Eric Baines, and I hope that you not only find some entertainment here, but also some helpful tips, trade secrets and ideas that will help you achieve your dreams. So one of the toughest parts about moving to the big city to follow your dreams is that you most of the time have to leave your family behind, unless you're really lucky, and being away from family can be tough, but I think we music provides you a space to meet people and it rings people together naturally, so you end up getting used to making family and I guess today is part of my family by marriage. Now he's my brother in law and he's a musician, he's a songwriting partner, he's a singer. He's also an actor. He's been in movies such as Disney's Halloween town high, returned to Halloweentown high school musical one, two and three. Also milk was Shawn Penn College Road trip, the adventures of food boy, little women, Alice upside down. He's been on TV. He was in a show called switched at birth. He's been on Smallville, Veronica, Mars, Boston, legal CSI, crime scene investigation. He's done tons of voice over acting. He's been on many episodes of family guy. He's a star of Pinky Malinkey on Netflix, the Cleveland show, robot chicken, sheriff Callie's wild west. But he's also a musician. He's got an EP called Sunshine which we did in two thousand and eleven. He's had songs and many films and TV. He's Sung in Arenas and stadiums all over the country and other parts of the world, not to mention the soundtracks from three high school musical movies, that two of which were the best selling records of that year. I'd also like to note that this was recorded on June fourth, two thousand and twenty, and some of the things that we talked about already feel a little dated, even though it was less than two months ago. But things are moving fast in the world today. But keep that in mind as you listen to my conversation with Lucas Graybeal Star. Thanks for coming. Hey, my pleasure. Really appreciate it. And be freend like lockdown and, you know, the protest. I didn't think we were going to be able to do it, I know. Thankfully, this like twice. Thankfully, everyone has, you know, gotten the great message to like, you know, stayed civil. I guess with the Protestants things so the the curfews been lifted, which is yeah, was our first night with no curfew. But I would say the one thing that the one, the best thing probably that's come out of all of this is social distance, which is a great number that you wrote and performed well. Thank you, I did. Those are really nice. Transitionally, I'm getting there I'm getting good at that now. That's cool. Well, I've when you just said social distance, I thought, Oh, well, I mean no, yeah, we are six feet apart, right, all that. But Oh, you mean the song, right, this song social distance, like we wouldn't have that, you know, in the world without all of this exactly. So, yeah, no, it's silver lighting. It was it. You know, it was one of those things that, as a lot of ideas come to you at random times, and I have all I have ideas that I think are funny all the time and I'll sometimes make a note in my phone, but so much of the time, you know, you take the one day test, you look back at it, at it again and you're either like what the hell was I thinking, or Oh, this is not funny at all, and it kind of stuck with me for a couple of days and I thought, well, I mean, surely this social distance, seeing, you know, all of us staying at home, is only going to last like a week, maybe two. That's what we thought, I know, and here we are like two and a half months into it now. It's insane. So yeah, then it was like all right, let's let's just take it the next step further and then the next step further,...

...and you created a kickass track. And think so that was you know, Oh, I should actually this is real, this is what I should actually do. This right. And then, yeah, once the mix was done and everything, it was like, oh, this needs a video now. So, yeah, you know that. But before you got to the video, though, you kind of this is kind of your maybe not your first production, but like I made the track, I made the music, but then I sent to you and you did all the rest. And how is that? That was I asked me, because I know it's awful. Very little that I hate more than recording and editing my own vocals. It's just the worst. I yeah, I hate everything, and I don't keep anything either. So I just I'll sing it, I'll sing a take and if I don't like one part of it, I just delete it, like right, and I'll just go and go and go, and then I'm like, Oh, I've been recording for four hours and I have one one track. Yeah, yeah, I know, I know, I do a lot of it myself and and but it's a great learning experience. Oh yeah, I was kind of happy when you're just taking it on and going for it, because what else you going to do on lockdown? Exactly exactly. And and you know everyone else is, it seems like everyone else is learning a new language or doing some extremely productive thing. So, you know, I'm right. Most days I feel pretty useless during this whole thing, but that was actually like, Oh, I have a purpose today, I can wake up and write, you know, make even if it's silly. Hopefully, I mean that was the whole point. It make a silly video that's relatable to what the situation is, what we're all feeling right and hopefully, you know, people dig it. Of course, the second you release something like that, it's like, oh, are people going to hate it? Like what's you know, social media is just terrible about that. Like yeah, you just never know, right know, it's like's going to be a divide? Is this the first of the last thing I'll ever do kind of like a podcast? But then I get, you know, Kenny, or take it, calling me and he was like hey, so, bet you know, she's a longtime friend. Wow, and I just thought this was amazing and I'd love to share it with her. Is it okay if I send it to her? I was like, well, I mean it's on social media. So I just send it to everybody. Right, right, it's seems but it got a private but maybe. Yes, but I love that old school, old Hollywood kind of thing about it, and I mean Ottoman. I grew up, you know, dancing around and singing bet miller when we were kids cleaning the house. Right. So it was kind of a cool full circle thing. I was like wow, I never thought that Miller would ever hear me seeing, let alone me covering or, you know, doing a parody of one of her songs. All right, I was really great. That's amazing. Social instance, the MED covid nineteen, as I cough. Bro, we're cool inside. I don't go while as you walk in your dog. Yeah, social distance. Don't call the parties, please, but I can. Don't even think of cooking, but fly, not even to see a mom Ra, especially if she's over sixty. Shot Hard, Feutu orse me, wood making tighter, key can't. People are crazy. He's smart and sure, freaking hands miss easy, just watching autumn, of course. Being your sister, my wife. Yes, those of you who don't know, yes, we are officially related. But marriage is a really good right, really good wet marriage to wedding. I guess we're marriage was a good wit marriage. Well, thank you. Yes, you actually married us. I did. That was that was pretty awesome. I married yet. It was an amazing day, that's for sure. Yeah, yeah, I think I'm I'm starting this whole podcast just going down people that were at my wedding. So it's been mentioned the whole time. It was. I mean I've never I don't know of any other wedding with better music. For sure, like all of the all the people were there. Yeah, we had like four bands. It was fun. I mean that's a nice thing about known musicians. And I was like, don't buy me a gift, you know, just please play some music. I'll give you a dinner,...

...you know. So, you know, it worked out pretty good. Yeah, a good time, that's for sure. I think everybody did. Yeah, and you've also just released a cool cover of when the party's over. Oh, yeah, it was that fun to make. No, it's another thing. That's like here I am by myself making yeah, I mean that's the other crazy thing about this quarantine. It's like not having that collaboration is really difficult, especially like I know a lot of people love doing creative things on their own, and I do a lot of times, but when it comes to music, and especially, I mean this is so funny because I've been doing I've been playing instruments and singing since I was a kid, and I still, you know, you put a microphone in front of me or a camera on me and I get so nervous still and I just like freeze up and again I do take after take after take, and if it's not perfect, then you know, I might not. Well, that's sucked. How's the worst thing ever? Yeah, and yeah, fighting, fighting your inner demons. And and then, you know, at the time my buddy was staying with me, and so that added a whole other layer because he's in the other room editing a TV show, working from home, and here I have singing, you know, loudly throughout the house, which dark and vulnerable. and Oh yeah, totally just there's nothing better that that feeling of being really vulnerable, just waiting for the door to open or like what, you know, for someone to come in and just ruin the entire moment. Yeah, we had a we had a thing before when he was still working. Every time he came home, I was always playing the piano and it was like, Oh, well, the only time that I sit down and play the piano, know, is when you walk in the door. It's like, you know, some weird let the singer's right, if you ever need him to come home, then that's what you do, right, right. Yeah, well, I thought it was awesome. Thank you. And you plan to do more of that stuff? Yeah, I've been. You know. Well, I was planning on doing a lot more of that stuff. You know, social media. This week it's just a it's it's it's different. Yeah, and then and it should be different. Right. But if if the last few months, if two thousand and twenty as of yet, has taught us anything, it's that we don't know what the Hell is going to happen tomorrow. Because right, I mean it seems like unbelievable. Literally, aliens could could come down and and take over tomorrow and we'd all be like, okay, cool. I mean, I was betting on zombies, but you know, sure, yeah, makes sense. I know. Yeah. So that's another reason I kind of wanted to postpone to is this isn't feel like we should be talking about music right the second. You know, I need to be a couple days and let everything relax a little bit, even just think your brain in it. You know. Yeah, it's really I do find it hard to be creative when you know there's so much going on and you want you want to be informed and educated and a part of it and and and as helpful as you can be right at you know, I can't begin to understand. Yeah, people go through right. Yeah, so it's it's it's a tough situation. But yeah, I do have a I had a lot of songs that I've been working on and hopefully there will be a right time and space for some nice music and levity and and and that kind of thing, because that's really why I am even on social media. I kind of hate it, but I'm an entertainer and that's what I love to do. I love interacting with people and fans and all that stuff. have been so lucky to be in so many really cool projects that, you know, I have a platform and so, yeah, when I when I can entertain people, you know, I'd love to do it. So if I'm quarantined, then making videos in my house is all I can do. Yeah, yeah, well, you made some videos that went on prime time not too long ago. Oh, right, which is look at you in your transitions. Yeah, it just well, it's interesting because I also did a thing with a friend of mine, Rudy, who's on another podcast, another episode of this. We did a facebook live performance and it's just so awkward as a musician because I'm used to having an audience. Yeah, and so it just makes the whole something to get used to. Yeah, and it might sort of end up being the future in a weird way, because all these I feel like it's it becomes a look now that people...

...are still going to want to use even after they don't have to. You know what I mean? Sure, so I wonder if this is going to be a part of your your in my life, you know, for the future. But then I started thinking about you and how like you've been on you you've done a lot of film and TV work where there's no audience, so maybe not as weird for you. Yeah, I mean, and you know the countless times I've auditioned home right tape and stuff. It's you know, I used to have a room in the house that was just dedicated to that right and so, yeah, I mean, but that just brings up only memories of anxiety, terror because I hate doing that too. So, you know, I yeah, I think you're right, though. I think they're and I've had many moments while thinking and brainstorming and learning these songs and thinking of different things to do in the future. Yeah, how much of this is going to be part of my regular career? You know, and I mean that's really the only way that you can get stuff out right now. So, yeah, I think we ought to get just just get used to it, because we have more control over right ourselves, you know, our situation by, you know, doing these live things. But yeah, and well, I mean like now that you have this space, this is this is incredible. You know, you write. You. Yeah, I'm we're now in my what used to be my garage, which is now a recording studio of sorts, a beautiful, important studio. And Yeah, it's been really cool. And and yeah, we did our live facebook thing from here too, and it's a cool it's a multi use space. Obviously podcast. I've done already a ton of music in here. Yeah, and now live stuff. So that's great. Yeah, it's awesome. So let's talk about songwriting, because me and you have written I don't even know how many songs six bunch. Well, then there was that one. Oh yeah, well, we kind of six point two, right. Yeah, yeah, now use use the song, the term song, loosely. Now. We've written a ton of songs. Most of our most recent thing was for a movie that you did called little women. MM. And not the most recent little women, though. No, not, not the Timothy Shallowmet I. I've said the One guy's name in the movie. Wow, I played the same role that Tim Timothy Shallomet played. So, as you know, all actors, everything's about me. So exactly, you know. Well, I'm glad I don't have to, you know, dance around that. No, I start in this amazing film called Little Women, and we you wrote most of the song, but we wrote Song for the credits. Yeah, produced it, but you brought it in as the verses were pretty much done and I think me and you just worked on the choruses. But yeah, and they're based on the script, essentially, like the dialog from the movie, from the book. Yeah. So was that, as a songwriter, like easier for you to do, or was it more constraining? You know, I I found it easier. I love writing when there's a project of like a goal to go for I like I write a lot of stuff that's just, you know, feelings and Oh, this is something that's important to me and I need to express it and blah, blah, blah. But yeah, having that kind of goal or like what's the word? Purpose? Purpose, kind of yeah, yeah, to be like okay, this, this is a song, it needs to be about this. And and I think music and movies just go so hand in hand, right, and I love songs that invoke visuals and and you know, spark the imagination and all that stuff. So when you already have the movie, I mean I start, I wrote it in a couple of nights while we were actually on set. That's just you know, I watched a scene and someone said something and I was like, Oh, that's a song lyric, and then I was like Oh, yeah, that's yeah, we can do that, we can make a song, and then I ran up by the director and the producers and they they were like, oh, this is great. And I even remember, like I was like reading some lyrics on our last night of filming, because I had finished the verses that time, and everyone was like, you know, we were crying because the well, I wasn't crying, of a man yeah, here we go again, the women, the little ones, right, the yeah, the little chicks. So they were all balling their eyes. APP No, but it was. It was. It was cool to to essentially, especially because the lyrics are so important, to have the...

...kind of blessing of everyone involved to be like, yeah, this is really, you know, encapsulating what what the movie was to us and what it is and the story and all that stuff. So that was really cool. And then, yeah, we we, we did it again. We banged out of awesome track and yeah, it's fun. I remember a lot of that stuff is just percussion that we're making up as we go. We're like stomped on the floor for the kick drum and yeah, and just beating on general, just stuff in the room. Yeah, it happened. That was really fun. I was cool. Yeah, and adding the Little Creeks and Oh, yeah, that was I was like stephing on your floorboards. Yeah, we're recording the floor creaks. Yeah, school, which went well with the movie because it's like a more of a modern cake. Yeah, I mean, check out little women, because it's a great story. Obviously they've got they've retold it so many times and and this is this one so is different because it's it's modern day and kind of, you know, moves the story into something that I think is a little bit more digestible and and it's cute. We made it for practically nothing and it looks beautiful, so it's cute. It's a cute film. Yeah, I liked it. That was good. Whispers is two secrets to stay within the head, Stop Your Feet, you kiss the book and Solidarity Clip Plan the castles in the attic before Golden Rings. Pay The words in her song. All the things drink, the painful rain, the trips on the memory drop, another stock bound with self for every screen foonds list so the mosses here dreams. She's always here, reminding you do all the things, all the things in your heart, and you also do another scene. Where are you saying? Another song that we wrote called Beautiful Day. Oh yeah, so you worked out, you know, you put two in there. Well before when I when my friend McClean Nelson told me about the script and them making the movie, I was like Hey, you know, you know who should be Marnie? Is Leah Thompson, and he was like, oh, that's a great idea, and I was like yeah, I have her phone number because she played my mom on television for seven years. And so after we worked out that, I kind of became a little producer on the movies. I think I was a CO producer, which anything besides just executive producer or producer is absolutely meaningless. But you know, being on set I got to like help out and and you know, it's nice when it's like Oh, hey, you guys need some music. Well, I just happened to have this guitar and this song that I wrote. That's what do you think about that? And they're like yeah, great. So yeah, it was awesome. Yeah, and it's interesting because if you watch the movie, it's an acoustic version of it, but it's really like an Edm track on the if you write, it's like a dance tune. Totally the real the the original product production of it. So yeah, you can check that out on youtube too. It's a pretty cool thing. It was actually a charity thing that we did for a little girls cancer and you know, so when you watch the video, that's going to be the start of it. You do have the right video. Yeah, definitely. It's a little girl who introduces stuff and and you made a video and made a song and it was kind of it was a cool thing. It was a cool thing. You know, I got to meet her over video chat beforehand and talk to her get to know her a little bit, and then, you know, I wrote the song and produced it and and then I actually went to see her in Chicago and and we've filmed a bunch of stuff. But after we've got done filming, I was like now this actually needs to be bigger and Mike, have more people involved. So I just had all these people sending these videos, from fans to fellow actors and other people, to family and friends, just to say what what made a beautiful day to them. And then, yeah, I thought it was a cool yeah, it's really cool, and try I got everyone thing and need it's beautiful day. Yeah, we also got a song and another show...

...that you were on that was kind of awesome. Brother, it was great, called switched to birth. Yeah, which was an interesting experience, and I kind of wanted to talk about the this in terms of like getting your your music on TV, because we sort of gotten too a little situation with the music supervisor and it was a weird thing because the riders were actually asking you, Hey, do you write songs, but the music supervisor was being sort of cut out of the loop and that didn't make her too happy about it, and not at all. And I remember literally like getting a phone called don't write any more songs. Yeah, yeah, but it was a real lesson for me as well, just as in like the chain of command and how to navigate something like that. I didn't have much communication with anybody could, but you were on the front lines of it. You know, totally. It was. It was a big lesson in humility for sure. You know I mean I you know, it's no secret I'm not a huge part of the show, especially not in the beginning. I was basically just the brother, and so I would work a couple of days a week or whatever and come in and say my one line and be done for the day, which was a cool, cool gig. But you know, at the same time I'm always wanted to do more and so when, yeah, the opportunity came up. I mean originally my character was some drug dealing, gambling addict, like Punk, and after we shot the pilot and the producers got to know me a little better, they're like, oh, yeah, you do music, you're a singer and would you? Would you be okay if toby had his own band and if you as a musician? I was like yeah, yeah, so, yeah, and then I'll, like you said, all the writers got super excited and they're pumping me up and saying yeah, like you, you know, this is great, and I'm like okay, cool. So we wrote a bunch of tracks. Yeah, and good songs that will never be heard. Yeah, anybody. Maybe we should put those out right. Yeah, and yeah. And so when when they basically said no, what do you think you're doing, you little actor boy? You're supposed to memorize your lines and stand on your mark and say those and be quiet all the other times. And Yeah, it was kind of a you know, I knew it wasn't personal, but it's hard not to take those things personal personally, especially when you work so hard creatively coming up with things that are I mean, we wrote songs that were specifically written for that band to sound like a high school group of kids, you know, performing a writing. And no offense to any of the other writers who wrote songs for the the show before and after. We had some good songs, but nothing was as tailored to the story into the character as what we did. I mean right, it's literally coming from me, which you know I had a pretty close relationship to the character. But you know, that's that's the lesson. You you can't take yourself too seriously and you can't always rely on, you know, what one person says, because you know, it's a whole team, there's a there's a hundreds of people. And Yeah, I mean we didn't even I didn't even know the music supervisor before that happened. And sadly, you know, we kind of got off on the wrong foot because of that thing and I think she probably thought that I was trying to, you know, come in and take over something. And so subsequently, all of the other records for the future records, recordings were not bad, but you know, it could have been a lot more comfortable, right, right, because they because then they went to outside riders, but you still had to sing it. Yeah, so now you have to be in the room with with folks. And the big thing, once think, comfortable. Yeah, you and I wanted to write songs and then still own the rights to them, and I think this is the big thing. And and you know Disney and Disney, Aka the ruler of the world right, you know, doesn't do things like that. They're like we want to own everything that goes on our shows and movies and and I mean that's not always the case, but you know, for for the level of TV show that switched at birth was at that time. It was like no, we're going to pay a guy a producer AC session fee essentially to write a song that he is never going to touch her own or have anything else, right from every work for high right, yeah, which, you know, that's a lot of people make their living. So it's not something that way. So that's not like a bad thing. But you know, coming from the artist, it was like I can write a song that's like really from the character, right.

Right. Yeah, then, you know, all the songs were fine, but we did get one song on and we did get one on. Yeah, that led to an EP. Yes, we you know, we sunshine coordinated. Yeah, the sunshine EP that we coordinated to kind of come out when the show, when that show aired, and and that, I don't know, I had a good time making all of that. So that was so much fun. Certainly wasn't a waste. And and you know, you're write songs and who knows if if something's going to come up and in a year from now and everything started going again and they might need one of those songs and we'll have it. You know, she's act. I'm not. I don't think it's a regret, but it was definitely a lesson in like, okay, find out the music supervisor first, first, yeah, and put it in her ears or her ear. And I remember because we wrote, we wrote some songs during one of our hiatus has and so I showed up basically like coming back to school from summer, with my CD's right, I was like handing out to the writers stuff. Maybe like you guys, I was really busy during my break, a bunch of songs for the band that should be on the TV show. Yeah, yeah, I've is done. They're like, Oh, yeah, this is I mean it was funny because the first responses I got from the writers, who knew nothing about how the inner workings of the company are, you know, concerned, we're like, Oh my God, these songs are great and it's awesome. Oh, I can't wait. And then, yeah, the producers like yeah, so, no, no, and you can stop now, like we don't want anyone's right. Are Songs. Yeah, it was. That was amazing. But you know, like I said, we got one on it was great. Totally. Is a great song. She shy. She likes so funny space. It's perfect on her face. Yes, she's my girl. Sometimes the darkness fills my skies. How she try so like no matter how black can be, she never stops. Now, stop shutting down up. So when did your start writing songs? A Lot, like a lot of kids, started probably ten different garage bands when I was a kid. All, you know, basically a lot of all the same people just switching instruments or band titles or whatever. My first, well, one of my first bands, I think I was twelve. Yeah, I think was like eleven or twelve, and it was like some friends from church and a couple of the guys in the band were home schooled, or one of them was homes I don't I can't remember. Anyway, their moms came over to hear US rehearse to make sure that we weren't we were not playing any secular music. We have we had to be a Christian band and of course we were not playing any Christ we learned one Christian Song so that we could play it when the moms came to pick him up. We're rocking out on this in my gosh, that's awesome. Of course we were playing like, you know, blink one hundred and eighty two and and God, I can't remember other bands that we played, but yeah, like punk and and really bad s rock. But yeah, so, I there was one guy who is named Kyle, he he he, and I wrote our first song together. I think I was yeah, I think I was like twelve or thirteen. It was called Nintendo, because that's that's what you know. They always say right, what you know right, and that's what you know. That's what I know so well. I've played that song many times now. Yeah, it's so it's still holds up as well. It's a crowd favorite people. Now it's like a retro thing. Yeah, yeah, it's nostalgia, right. That's awesome. But yeah, you know, it's funny. I've poured my heart out and spent years writing, attempting it, writing eloquent lyrics and and the...

...most requested songs. When about Nintendo preteen, that's awesome. Well, they say talked about Mozart and that sense to he were most of the stuff and was younger. Like six years old he started writing whatever. So it's like you just relate to it differently because it's simple. It's complicated, but in a simple childlike way. You know what I mean? Yeah, totally don't know. I'm just saying that when I listen and Nintendo, it reminds me of modes art. I don't know, I should do a string arrangement of it. Yeah, time very perfect. And you grew up in Springfield Missouri. HMM. Well, with my wife, I grew up with your wife. Yeah, we actually grew up in the Booney's, which I had to tell some British friends the other day what that was, because I just said it off the cuffs, like I grew up out in the BOONEY's, and they're like yeah, I'd I went with that means and in the British Oh yeah, lar. I stopped myself really quickly because I'm like, I don't know what that could mean. We're probably going to be bad right. I was like, it just means that you don't have any neighbors and you live on a really long dirt road, that that just kind of goes on and on until it ends at your house. Well, so, yeah, we lived outside of a town of two five hundred people. It's a super, super small which was great in a lot of ways. Freedom to run around, right, you know, sprain my sister with the hose in summer. You know, I guess you can do that anywhere. You know, I do it all the time. But yeah, no, it was great, but I always wanted, like, I remember vividly being outside in this like picturesque, you know, beautiful ozark's backwoods, you know, kind of scenery setting, and all I wanted to do was be able to walk to a seven eleven and get a slurpy and play stickball with some New York kids from the s right. Yeah, I had a really weird view of what living in the city. That's funny. Yeah, I was kind of the same way, like I think you're born a certain way. I don't know, maybe there's probably a spectrum, but I grew up in the BURBS, like a suburban as it gets, but always wanted to be in the city, always. And I grew up in Colorado. I was near mountains and boss of building it is. Don't care. Don't to this day, don't really care. Yeah, I'm much more happier in La you know, concrete jungle in New York, Boston, you know, to College Boston. Awesome city. Yeah, and I man, when I first got their houses. This is this is what I always dreamed of and I never got tired of it. Oh, you know, and here I am, been La for twenty years and still loving it. Yeah, no, I do too. I remember first time, I was sixteen, when I went to New York for the first time and the cab went straight from of course we stayed in in Time Square, because that's yeah, that's what you do when you're in from Missouri. Yeah, actually, I kind of do it anymore anyways, because because it's just near everything. Like it. Yea, I know it is. It's the cheapest hotels, you know, and like you're right next to Broadway and you know, and all the shows and I don't know. Usually if I'm going there as a tourist, that I'm I'm just going there as a tourist right now. If I'm working, then we'll stay wherever I right right now. But I so remember that moment of like stepping out of the cab and just like seeing, taking it all in and feeling that energy, in the terrible smell and and I was just like man, this is the best thing ever. Yeah, I'M gonna be here someday. Yeah, so, did you originally think about going to New York or with always la or I really thought? I always thought I was going to to move to New York. I was going to work at Chevies as a waiter and, you know, you found out you could do that here. You're like, Oh, and I can have like an apartment that's the size of two closets instead of one. Exactly. No, but yeah, I thought it was going to be a really long, hard battle to get my way on Broadway, but it was. It was nothing was going to stop me kind of thing. And then, yeah, you're before I graduated high school, I visited La and Whoo, I was like wow, this place is really cool and it's so much better weather. And you know, on top of that, I who was ordering a smoothie and a guy came up to me and basically, you know, did the Cinderella Discovery Story and was like Hey, kid, you gotta look you should be in the pitches, and I was like Whoa, that's why I'm here. And Yeah, he was my manager for ten years, which just that's crazy in in saying it's all that's hit in...

...the lottery. Yeah, definitely. I mean which kind of led to really hit in the lottery. Like how far from that was high school musical? So three years, so including a year of high school. So yeah, wow, right, night I met him. This was the summer before senior year. I go back home. He's sending me auditions and I'm like, my first audition I taped at the football field because it was like I was playing a football player in some or I was audition named it was. It was not even an audition. He was sending me a tape just to see if I could act or not. Right, but yeah, so I was. He was sending me more and more and I was like, look, I can't be in student council and Choir and band and, you know, theater shows and all this stuff and focus on starting a career in La when I'm twozero miles away. Like let's just chill for a minute. I promise I'll come out and he he was like, Oh yeah, I'm never going to hear from this kid again. And then I graduated high school and I was like Hey, I'm coming August first. He's like, whoa okay, cool. So first week I had Egypt meetings and signed sign one right away. And Yeah, within five months I had done three national commercials and a movie for Disney. Wow, that's fast, super fast. And then about too. Then then the first lull happened, which was all full but such a great learning experience. You know, did the whole like gotten to an accident, had my hood of my car held on by Bungee chords and the light was it was taped on with duct tape because I was really trying to bring them Assouri. Yeah, to last fires as much as possible. Wow. And then, yeah, about two, two and a half years so from when I first moved to La was when I booked high school musical. And Yeah, that's when I was like, okay, blockbuster, I'm not working here anymore, which is probably good because they don't exist anymore. And Yeah, you were going to lose that job anyways. So, man, a month before, a month before I quit, the district manager was like, Lucas, I just I want to talk to you. You're great, you're great employee and I see a future with you in blockbuster. No Way. They tried to promote me so many times and I was like, no, I will not be a manager of any blockbuster. I am having the least amount of responsibility problem. You might have your own store one day. That's looking there. Your life would have been said. He's like, look at me, I'm a district manager. Wow, and hey, nothing against being the district manager of several blockbusters right back then. Right, but we all know what happened. Yeah, but they're all they don't have those jobs either. Right. Yeah, I saw my first manager, the guy who hired me in my first job. Well, no, I actually booked my first commercial before blockbuster got back to me, because I had three rounds of interviews for blockbuster. Just send in a video first. I'm going to give you my profiles and anyway. Yeah, I saw him a couple of years ago working at bed bath and beyond and I was like, Mike, oh my God, it's me Lucas. You airned me, like you know what. I was little kid at blockbuster, and I could see he was like like, I don't know, it's kind of a sad moment. Oh Man, I can imagine, because you know, he was like Hey, well, so everything's going well with you? Then no, I was like hey, there's nothing wrong with working at bed bath and beyond if you enjoy it. I don't. I mean you were you just had different goals. Yeah, so, I don't know, the sites on retail, you had other plans. Yeah, and I never yeah, that's that's that's why I couldn't be anything more than a CSR. Yeah, absolutely. I mean I think it's important to keep your eye on the ball, for sure, totally, when those opportunities, that the easy ones, come up, you know, you got to no one to say no because, especially at that age, it's like you got nothing to lose. This is the time to be forcing yourself, to struggle to make it to where you're going. Totally. And I looked like I was twelve my so I couldn't get a fake ID with all the money in the world. I saw I you know, I was eighteen, I. So, you know, I wasn't in school, so the only friends I had were co workers at blockbuster, right, and my buddy Michael Brown, who moved out with me. But yeah, I mean there's there is nothing else to do but focus on the career, right, and I was like, every day wake up, what can I do today...

...to get myself further? I actually did record my first album during that time with those long, like eight inch long, computer mics, whatever, those Yehesb mics totally and I had to like barely sing sometimes and sing off to the thing. If you just like talk in a normal voice, it would peak, ha ha, no compression. Yet, no compression and and yeah, everything had to be in one take, no adity either. So yeah, Wow, star. I have to confess something. I love books, but I don't love reading, and it's been something that I've wrestled with since I was a kid. You know, I can read. I have read books, but they're very time consuming and I've spent most of my time trying to build a music career it which takes a lot of time. But one thing I definitely do a lot of is drive in La traffic on my way to a Gig, and there's a solution that combines those two situations and that's called Audiblecom Attoo has thousands of audiobook titles and you can listen offline, anywhere, anytime. The APP is free and can be installed on all smartphones and tablets and they have just a ton of music related titles, like all you need to know about the music business. By Donald has pass man, how music works by David Byrne, or music production secrets by Calvin Carter. And you can get a free thirty day trial right now if you visit audible trialcom dive Bar rock star. That's audible trialcom dive bar rock star. I'd like to take a second to thank you for listening to the dive, Bar Rockstar podcast. As a new podcast, getting the word out as a vital part of what it takes to keep the show on the road, or off the road, as the current case may be. If you would like to support the podcast, all you got to do is subscribe wherever you listen and if you have an extra minute or two, please leave a review. You can also share and follow the podcast on your social media APPS. Okay, enough begging. I hope you're having fun and once again, thank you for listening. So then you got the high school musical movies, Hmm, and order the movie. First movie. Really, I'll take it slower, because we met on the next phase, which was the concert tour. Yeah, but when you got that, were you? So here's a situation again where, like, music is coming back and like you didn't just get an acting job. Yeah, you got a triple threat job. You know, was that exciting at the time I decided to get the role? Well, I mean yes and no. I really it was. Like I said, it was after my first kind of lull not working and and really hating working at blockbuster and not having you know something, you know, when you don't have control over your own destiny, it's just it's the worst. But you know, I told some friends and even autumn my sister that I had this call back for this untitled high school musical project and as soon as I just said the title, everyone's like, oh, well, you're totally going to get it. I mean you are Mr Theater Guy. I was like, but I don't may maybe that's not what I want to be. Maybe I WANT TO BE MR serious actor guy, or more maybe funny man, Jim Carrey Guy, you know whatever. But I really thought that I wasn't. I grew up doing so much musical theater I thought, well, that's going to be something that I'll do later on. In New York. You don't come to La right to do musicals right. And but yeah, once we started recording the songs and learning the choreography and doing the the preproduction and rehearsing. It was like wow, this is such a good fit and and I'm so happy to be here. And yeah, it was silly and cheesy and over the top and all that stuff, but for kids. Yeah, and it's defense totally. And you know, the thing is like entertainment comes in all shapes and sizes and right, and movies. You need movies of all different shapes and sizes to because you never know, you we all need to be entertained to different ways different times, right, and that took me a long time to to believe that with high school musical, but at the time it was really just about the experience and the experience was pretty amazing. Yeah, Kenny was can you artake out, can you or take of the direct director was also what, like, done tons of Michael Jackson videos, like the newers Zanna do, as far back as that. Yeah, he did dirty dancing. He was just the choreographer of dirty dancing and second unit director. He directed the parade scene in Ferris Bueler's stay off right and of course hocus pocus...

...and news. He's or as too big Disney movies in the s. So it's a big deal. Yeah, no, and he just his incredible talent is rallying people and inspiring people and he he had a way to take my cynical ass attitude and just totally whip it around and and feel emotional about singing these, you know, silly songs. Right, right, because they were silly to me, but at first, but once he said this, says this has this is not going to work unless every moment of this movie has heart. And I chees. He's just cheesy. But if you have if you're really trying to connect with people and tell a story that's inspiring and that that is what translates to real and all of that. You know right, not that the acting was that real and awesome by any of us, but that's how y's you know, that gave it its charm. Yeah, and it's sort of that Disney formula to in a way. You know, they just know it's almost they just have a weird sense of Oh, that's just cheesy enough, but not too cheesy right now. I don't know. They know their audience extremely well. I mean it was extremely successful. When I heard one of the executive producers, billboard and WHO's become a good friend of mine, he was telling me years down the line, the story of how it got to Russia, because every you know, it went to a lot of European countries and and South American countries. First, like right off the bat, super easy. You know, any place that loves American movies, whatever is fine, but in Asia and in Russia it just wasn't. They had a lot of resistance because they're like, you have cheerleaders and you're you're singing about things that are so American. Right, our children are not going to have any connection to that whatsoever. Right. And of course, when it became a hit in Russia, I was like, okay, that that says something. That's that's pretty it's pretty crazy. And it ended up being the number one selling album in the world that year. Wow, yeah, that's amazing. And then the next year the number one selling album in the world was high school musical to soundtrack. She's it's incredible. Well, obviously somebody knows something that I don't know. and well, they had so many great people who, I mean, you know, Shit, all the people who are writing songs on that. We Are we're writing for right the you know, the top pop artists at that time. So they got some they got some good people and it led to the concert tour where I was the bass player. That's how we met, MMM, and that was that was amazing to me, like I couldn't believe. You don't know when they're like, Oh, let's it's these Disney kids and they're going to do it. They have a musical movie and they're going to do a concert, and it doesn't. Don't. I didn't know what to expect whatsoever from a maide full made for cable TV movie, musical. All right, it's going to turn into a concert. Yeah, and I was like, but it pays? What? Okay, and you know it's ricky minor is the band leader. The Band is, I know, all guys that I knew, and we're just like these guys are phenomenal players, and that was it was fun too, because we took those songs and just really did it like, you know, it was a live band and you know, tracks and stuff enhanced stuff, but like some of the best players in town playing this stuff. It just brought it to a whole different level. I remember the first just opening the door to the rehearsal space first time and hearing you guys play. I was just like, Oh shit, this, this is this is insane, this is something incredible. And Yeah, yeah, that was like best two months of my life. Yeah, incredible time, incredible experience. Super Low Times for sure. You know, it's weird being thrust into that kind of lifestyle and being on the road and right, going from the bus and yeah, going from Twentyzero people screaming and you can't hear yourself talk to the utter silence of a bunk of a bunk and yeah, welcome to my life. I know that's you were also the MC the whole thing, so that was another thing. I was impressive to me. We did well first tours, forty eight shows, and then we went to South Americans. It's stadiums after that, speaking of being hit, like then we're playing to Eightyzero people in a stadium. Yeah, and not one time down there the power went out, if you remember right, MMM, and we had to like restart the show. Any came on stage might have been I'm feel like it was early on. Oh than that would might have been Argentina or Chile a or something,...

...but I don't remember the exact city. But other than that, the point is flawless tour. Like there was never any problem. Ever, the show went off flawlessly every night. And you know, that's just having I mean Vanessa was eighteen. That's having younger people. I just didn't know. I just feel like it was amazing. It would. Yeah, it blew me away. It was. It was crazy. I definite was seventeen, I think. Yeah, time like we got high school kids. I mean you were older. Yeah, but it was amazing. But still, like none of us had had that any any experience that would be close to that kind of, you know experience. So as an arena tour, that turned into a stadium tour and we had the top cruise from nine inch nails and Jlo and like the band members. You know, it was it was a real deal. Like I had older friends of mine that came out to the show when we were in New York and and I was like, you know, it's for kids, it's like a high school ty and he got done. He's like, that's not a kid show. That's that was just phenomenal concert. Yeah, I mean now it was ninety minutes of just non stop fun and and just yeah, audio visual, the pyrotechnics, the the confetti cannons. Yeah, we had Paul McCartney's led screen right, which at the time was the biggest one in the world. Wow, I didn't even know that. Yeah, yeah, that was amazing, the opening of that. I mean it's it's Nerdy, it's a kid show, yeah, but the opening of that concert I was just like this, with that low rumble and the countdown of the basketball clock and stuff. It was genius. It is really great concert material. And I mean, and Kenny is an amazing choreographer and director of Film and Television, but man, when he's directing a live show like that's when I feel like he's just unstoppable. Like it's incredible what he did with like you said, you know it's like, Oh, this is just it's a kid thing for you know, musical whatever. But no, it was exciting and thrilling and yeah, I, you know, am seeing it was just I think that's one of the most special things about all that I did, with all the high school musical experiences, movies and stuff, was just just being able to I don't know, like what kid hasn't dreamt? Well, maybe a lot, but that was like my first dream was to be a rock star and to be on stage by myself with with a an amazing band behind me, and I just raised my hand with the microphone in my hand. Twentyzero people scream or Eightyzero people scream. I mean this is this is nothing better than right. There's like yeah, Oh man, we do I write home about this, mom's gonna slip me. Yeah, made it. Yeah, and then we went down to the south area. You have to learn two different languages as well, because they mean it's teleprompters, I guess. Yeah. Yeah, there's also like all these things out could have been a disaster with just amazing. Yeah, I remember. The hardest part was each you know, each country has a different, you know, way that they say certain I think so. Sometimes it was Domas Cabalettos, Domas ekb my come a Yettos, but you know, like every every region has a different you know, I think like dialect, and I'm like, but you know, everyone knows that I don't actually speak Spanish and I am American and I'm clearly white, and they're like yeah, but if you do this, you are that's you taking that next step. is going to mean the world to them. Them exactly, and boy were they right. That was incredible. The responses that we had. We had amazing cell sold out shows all across America that were very spirited, but nothing like it was down there. No, incredible. No, and just in general, is audience is down there. I mean they're just they still love life music, you know, and like, you know, stuff like that. We be in a different way that America's sort of over it or I don't even know. Yeah, no, it like the band was easily one of my favorite parts, you know, and it it. I think I'm more of a musician. I'm not a real musician, but I'm more of one than the rest of the cast was, and so having that kind of backing to us gave me so much. I mean I just was so pumped and like just about to explode every every, every show. So that was cool. Yeah, that's made it harder, though, in the bus trying to calm down right. Yeah, especially because I was like, I think I waited a hundred and twenty five for four pounds and I was like going nuts over...

...this nutritionist and like so I wouldn't like I'd barely have a beer or whatever. It is really, oh, it's like too many calories. WHOA really? Yeah, I was drinking my ass I mean they were definitely man buzz, most nuts man. It was just off the chain every night. Well, you know, Corbin was on my bassins. You know, his mom was there for the first few dates and then it since it was a new bus, it had that chemical smell and she was like literally having every time she got on the bus she had this like massive migraine. So she had to go home and his dad, David, came and did the rest of the tour. So it was cool, but still it's like, you know, yeah, you know what, I forgot about that. Actually, the tour manager sat the band down while we were rehearsing over it, Sony, the final dressers and the things, like okay, here's the deal. It's a it's a no alcohol tour because we got kids on this thing. You guys are gonna be able to drink, but I see one person given any alcohol to these kids or whatever. You know, it's like it'll be over, you know. So we're like okay, because we're all kind of wondering because we're but when a fight adults like we're in our minute to the late s in like yeah, I'm gonna go out for two months on a bus and I have a drink? I don't think so. So, but I do remember that. I mean we all ended up drinking together, especially South America and stuff. But yeah, well, in the tour, the the security guards were on our bus as well. The girls were like, you know that they had to have extra room for their bags. So right, we got and and not I'm not that I'm complaining, but having the security guards, it was like, oh well, there's room on the guy's bus, right, we'll just toss them in there. Yeah, but it actually turned out to be really fun. And Yeah, we did. We did throw back a couple of beers occasionally. Not Corbin, not night, not what not before he turned twenty one. Right, exactly, because you shouldn't do that. No, yeah, I used to call it Disney after dark. Yeah, one of our security guards speaking, which would always open the beer bottle with his teeth and I was like that's the most baddest thing I've ever seen, and he was like six hundred eight. Yeah, just I don't know, I know what Larry? No, Oh, yes, yeah, yeah, Oh, man, love Larry, big huge. Yeah, he was awesome, dude, great and we got to meet maco, Michael Jackson on that tour as well. With my God, my mind, what crazy experience that was. Yeah, said Kenny's good friend, and I remember we've Been Vegas. It's like it was a second last show because we did Vegas in the mode, the stable center, and that was the end of that first tour. Crazy and we and I also remember, and I might be wrong, but I did do a lot of drinking, so maybe I'm wrong, but it was only show that started late. Yeah, so we was because we were on Tom Every and it was an hour and a half show and it was done. There was so much kind of cooler than other tours were. You like it gigels forever and you never know, but I just remember it being like the president was coming and we're holding the show and then secret surface guys come in and then Michael Jackson is three kids, you know, and we had all kind of sequestered into a dressing room to I mean we didn't get to like hang out much because right we were holding the show. Literally, yeah, it's like great to meet you, but then I just remember watching him because he sat right behind the sound booth and they kind of cordon it off with black curtains and stuff, and I'm just the whole show. I'm just like, that's Michael Jackson watching me play. Oh yeah, supposedly, according to Kenny, inspired him to do this. Is it right now? That was crazy. I don't know what what was more nerve racking? Performing for the King of Pop while wearing sequenced Fedora's and and, you know, outfits obviously inspired by him, right, what he had done in the past? Were performing in front of Eightyzero people in Brazil. Both both were just like this will never happen again. Moments, right. And Yeah, you know, you just have to take all of those mental pictures as much as you can and try to try to cherish those those times, because, yeah, that that's what was so crazy. Highs and lows, because it's like, Oh my God, I can't believe this is real life. Oh, five seconds from now this is not going to be real life anymore. I mean, we're not going to continue to be rock stars for the rest of our lives, right, all right. So, yeah, I'm just staying. It was definitely a crazy, crazy experience. Yeah, and the FANDOM was insane and just out of control, which kind of brings me to just to get off the top of music, I just want to tell the story to the world because it's one of my favorite stories because we hung out a lot. You know, you know, but I at least six and at least six and a half time. We wrote a song every time. But one of my favorite stories is walking through Vegas and me and You and autumn and your mom, I believe, and you and switched...

...it. Birth had just come out and it was a it's a show about deaf people essentially, and kind of showed deaf people in a new way in the whole show is based around it. And Yeah, you were signing and stuff. But we ran into this couple and they were both deaf and they recognized you. And I had been around you a lot with high school music. Sure, musical fans coming up and recognizing you. Totally different situation. These people were just blown away. It was just like thank you, thank you, thank you, and like just the the way that they expressed was wait, was so different and and it was a really moving thing to me. And you signed to him a little bit and stuff. But did that feel like a shift, you know, in the rest of the way that you interacted with the people, you know, with your fans, or was that just sort of a moment in time, or did you did you feel like you were doing an important show at that point? You know, autumns brought it up a couple of times that there's just something. It's not every project that I do, but so many of the things that I've been lucky enough to be a part of have some sort of special thing to them. And Yeah, you know, it always starts off the same way. I get this job. Oh It's my first TV role. Lots, that'd be cool. Maybe it'll maybe, you know, doing the it wasn't my first pilot. First pilot I did was a David Kelly pilot. Everyone was like get your get your check books ready, because you know your lives about to change. You're on a day David Kelly show. It did get picked up. So it's like, Oh, and so, you know, this show came along. I thought, well, they might get picked up. Who knows? And it did. Oh, maybe a little go a season, maybe too, who knows. You know, five, five seasons later, seven years later, we're, you know, still going. So it yeah, it having experiences like that are really great markers and reminders of of you know, it's just a different perception each time. That I get further away from high school musical, I think about those fan experiences and and in a different way than obviously when it's happening and you you know, it's a lot to kind of take in all at once. And same went for switched to birth. At first it was like well, of you know, it's definitely a mixture with the high school musical and the switch to birth, you know, fans and stuff, but meeting someone who was deaf and that I could actually communicate with right for the first time in it and that that was the special thing. It's like. Without doing that project, obviously those people it may have recognized me from high school musical, but they probably wouldn't have stopped me because they're like, oh, well, he's he's hearing and you know right, so right, we'll just we'll just skip over that. But since they had seen me sign on television and since it was an important show to them because we were, you know, shedding light on the deaf community, which no TV show really. I mean TV shows have done that, but we were the first television series, of believe, to have series regulars, multiple series regulars. That death right. And so yeah, to have that kind of interaction and that's what, you know, makes it so important when you meet those people who you know. We were talking about live performances as opposed to filming things earlier. It's like you have to start. I live for those moments because that's that live interaction that I have with people in and I battle so much of my career. I have battled so much of my career with validity of what I do because someone so much of the time, you know, you just kind of feel like you're a puppet or or just, you know, a silly guy dancing and it's like, I'm not a doctor, I'm not, you know, building homes for the homeless, I'm not. You know, I feel kind of right frivolous sometimes. But meeting someone like that and actually getting to communicate with them in a way that would have never happened if it weren't for that TV shows really cool special. That's cool. Yeah, I totally. I think that's goes hand in hand with any sort of art. It's like, specially in these times when shit gets real and the real world, you start to feel pretty insignificant, you know, definitely, and yeah, I struggle with the same thing, you know. But yeah, especially locked in in in your house. It's like, yeah, I don't know, I don't think I want to go to that dark actually understood. Well, Hey, there's I mean, we were doing so good, I know, but hey, we're both dark people. Yeah,...

...we have dark moments, and that I think everybody has dark moments. That's that's just like. Well, it's the creative people and US also sort of IT forces us to explore or to I don't know, we pay attention to darkness differently than, I think people that aren't creative or don't make art or don't you know that it's sort of what we use to to make what we make. Right, you have to have a relationship with it which keeps you close to it exactly when the world is handing you extra doses of it. It's hard to know when to put it away exactly now, unless you're associate that right. And Yeah, then you don't have to be an artist. You can just live in that dark place. Yeah, well, I don't even think you know that it's a dark right. Yeah, I don't even think you think that it's dark. Yeah, just like there is no emotion to anything totally, you know. But well, that was a great thing to end on right. I know we're getting towards the end. How do I pull this out of this? You're really trying my skills. Well, the other thing that I thought just to go back to high school musical and I didn't want to talk this much about it, but I'll tell you, the time flies so fast you when you get into this. But the other thing that you had brought up to is, like when we did that tour, we were, you know, fifteen to twenty thousand kids a night their first concert. Yeah, you know. So now a whole generation of people saw us as their first concert. You know. So that's that's pretty important too. Is Forgot about that. Yeah, that was really cool, meeting kids at the meat and greed or out by the bus after the show's and yeah, hearing them being like that was my first concert ever and it was so cool and I can't believe by meeting you right now. Yeah, that was really special. As long as the parents kept their mouth shut, it was great. Yeah, yeah, I heard some definitely the worst. Yeah, and then they when they feel justified because it's their kids, they were the fan. They probably would have been better behaved, but they're doing it for their kid. Well, just watching people just just have the worst behavior as an example for their kid. But they're doing it for their kid. They want, can we just get one autograph? It's for my kid, you know. We're like uh, yeah, yeah, it's a trip. And then you look at the kid and and they're mortified and like exactly, no, mom please get me away from here right I don't I'm so embarrassed and I even if I get that autograph, I'm going to hate you forever. Now. There is one great story that I've told a few times that I remember. One of the we ended the show with. We're all in this together. The Confetti cannons go and then we do one more chorus and everyone's singing and, you know, dancing together and looking out in the crowd, there was a guy with his daughter on his shoulders and she's just singing along, having the greatest time ever and tears are streaming down from his face. Yeah, and it was like that was definitely one of those special moments of like Oh man, that's really cool that he's having that. You just got a like a little window into their life and it was like, oh, that's cool that they're having that moment that they're going to have forever. Yeah, and you know, yeah, and that's important. Father Daughter moments are cute. Yeah, in a way it's more important because it's for kids. Yeah, you know, it's not just punk rock for a bunch of rebels or like, you know, there's which, you know, you could argue any of it's important, but you can also argue it argue that none of it is. You know, yeah, definitely, of course, all I wanted when, you know, when we were doing it was God off, if it's only I was singing songs that I had written about, you know, the darkest moments of my life, and who were singing along to those lyrics right then it would have been amazing, you know, bro Yeah, that was incredible. Yeah, and I had the other the same. I've told story buch too, but like standing on the stage and running eighty Thousan people thinking, well, I'm not playing here with Madonna or Elton John, but this is it, this is what they do, this is the life that they lead, this is I've made it, you know, like this is certain level. You know, like it was, it was special in its own way and like the you're totally right and looking back now, it's like, well, that was pretty cool. Yeah, it was. I will always look back on that fondly. I mean, you know, even the tough times, in the dark moments, taught me so much about myself and you know, definitely it's one of the things that made the cast and I so close and right, even if we bickered or whatever we were, we are a family. We always will be, and you know, to go through an experience like that that's just so crazy. Yeah, with a group of people that I would never pick out on the street and say, yeah, the six of us should be friends right. Yeah,...

...it was like, Oh wow, yeah, this is this is something that we will always share. Yeah, Oh man, I talked about it a lot because I was kick Thematsui for twelve years and we used to go to eastern Eastern Europe on man cornions, Siberia, literally into Siberia, riding on buses with barely any heat and like. But you get back and you look at your bandmates and it's like coming back from war. Yeah, you know, it's not. I didn't didn't lose a limb or see anybody die, but it's, you know, it's a bonding experience that you can't get anywhere else. And, like I said, I don't you know. So you know, I was a musical director, so I got to choose a little bit of who was going to be on those tours. But you don't know. You know it's your job. You're going to go out with these people and whether you like them or not doesn't really matter. You're going to have to get through this and you know, and you end up being so bonded. Yeah, it's interesting the adventure. Yeah, it's crazier. Well, this has been an absolutely fabulous talk. Man. Thanks. There was so much more on my list, but you know it, we're gonna try tell it again much. Would you live up the street? You come over and yeah, I will do it an episode two, but I didn't feel like this was an interview at all. I feel like this is what I mean. We were doing this last week. Just we get into a room sometimes and talking to microphones at each other. So the beauty of owning the gear. Yeah, no, I love it. I thank you so much for having me. This is great. Star. Well, I hope you enjoyed that. I really had a good time talking to Lucas Gray Bill. What a cool guy he is, and I really liked his blockbuster story, talking about how, you know, he was offered this management position, you know, many times and a future a blockbuster, but he kept his eye on the ball and he kept and he said no to those things that we're going to distract him, and he in a way that easy money. He was already and he could have done that. And to look into the eyes of Los Angeles and try to have an acting career, it's it could be pretty daunting and when someone hands you and an offer sometimes it's tempting to take. But he wouldn't be where he is today, obviously, if he had taken that offer. So it's a good thing to keep in mind if you're going to attempt a career in music, especially in Los Angeles, you got to keep your eye on the ball. And he also mentioned that he's not a real musician, and I think what he means by that is like, this isn't his total living and he hasn't studied music. But let me set your mind at ease. He's very talented and he's he plays guitar and keyboards and and a bit of drums and he sings and write songs and he's a super talented musician because he's not a professional and I respect that that he sort of that he doesn't call himself a musician all the time because, you know, he's seen guys that really are great players as well and if spent their whole life studying music and he and he has some respect for that as well. So I thought that was pretty cool of him, but I also thought that it's worth mentioning in case you're like no, Lucas, you are a real musician, and I think it's about definition. He definitely plays music, he plays it at a at a fairly high level, and he also respects the fact that other people dedicate their lives to being the best musicians that they possibly can. So the videos that I mentioned that he did for prime time was for the Disney sing along that aired on April sixteen on ABC, where they had a high school musical reunion, as most of you know, because I'm sure you all tuned In't watch that, the little women movie that he was in. It came out in two thousand and eight teen and it was directed by Claire Neederprum, so check that out and switched at birth. The show that he was on is not going any longer. It kind of sounds like it was by that interview, but it last aired on January thirty one, two thousand and seventeen. And lastly, the high school musical soundtrack was the best selling TV soundtrack of two thousand and six and the high school musical to soundtrack was the best selling album of two thousand and seven, and this is all according to Wikipedia, so you can take that with a grain assalt. Well, I hope you guys had a good time. Wow, you've made it to the end. I'm hoping it's because you completely enjoyed yourself and are now filled with knowledge and inspiration to move forward with your dreams. If that is the case, and you would like to stay informed of new episodes, live events in general news, please go to dive Bar Rock starcom and sign up for the mailing list. If you have any questions, comments, corrections or complaints about anything you here on the show, please email me at fan mail at dive Bar Rockstarcom and you may even end up on the show. We at the dive Bar Rockstar podcast with all of our hearts. Thank you for listening and remember, it's all about dreams.

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