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The Dive Bar Rock Star Podcast
The Dive Bar Rock Star Podcast

Episode 24 · 1 year ago

Joe Travers- Happy Franksgiving! (Joe Satriani, Dweezil/Ahmet Zappa, Duran Duran)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Drummer, Joe Travers, reflects on his years as the “Vaultmeister” for the Zappa Family Trust and explains his duties there. He talks about his first gig in Los Angeles with Dweezil and Ahmet Zappa which was attended by Frank Zappa himself. He gives an inside look into his time touring with Duran Duran and how he got the gig. Joe remembers his journey from Berklee College of Music to California where his career took off and talks about the upcoming documentary, “Zappa”.


Zappa Movie Trailer:

https://youtu.be/U4F0rT0F6OQ


Waiting For Monday:

https://open.spotify.com/playlist/37i9dQZF1EF4KeKRXZUK7N?si=YE7AfbXvSr-x7Dbfoc2kVg


www.divebarrockstar.com

If you are a fan of the dive Bar RockStar podcast and would like to help support the show, there's a great waythat you can do that and start a new fashion trend. We have a newmerchandise page on the website, which features t shirts and hoodies that areavailable for sale on Amazon, just click on merchandise, in the top menuand all of the links will be there or go directly to dive or rockstarcommerchandise. Get started early on your Christmas shopping at dive Barrockstarcom. Welcome to the dive Bar Rock Starpodcast, the show exploring the lives of professional musicians of all typestouring, musicians, recording artists, songwriters engineers, bar bands,wedding bands and anyone making their living in the music industry, whetheryou've dreamed of being a professional or you already are one. This is thepodcast for you on your host Eric Banes, and I hope that you not only find someentertainment here, but also some helpful tips, trade secrets and ideasthat will help you achieve your dreams. It's the week of Thanksgiving twothousand and twenty and of course the coronavirus is on attack worse thanit's ever been, and you know I know it's different in different places. Ihappen to live in Los Angeles, which we have the most cases right now, butwe're also the biggest county in all of the US and bigger than a lot of otherparts of the world as well. So it's tricky but- and it's also hard tomake the decision between Seeang family and trying to avoid this disease.That's been confusing at best. You know to figure out, but I hope everybodystays healthy and safe and has an awesome holiday because I do think,there's still quite a bit to be thankful for, and things couldn'talways get worse. So you know it's it's the season of gratitude and that'snever a bad thing, but there's a new documentary coming out and for those ofyou that know me personally, I call myself a documentary junkie because Ijust I love Thim, so I'm excited and the documentary is about Frank Zappacomes out this week, so we are going to call this franksgiving. I stole thatfor my guest, but I think it's awesome. My guest today has been the vaultmister quote, unquote for the Franks, APP o vault for many many years andhe's helped to put together the soundtrack for this movie, which waswritten and directed by Alex Winter, who you may know as bill from the billin Ted Movies. I've only seen the trailer, but itlooks incredible so I'll put a link in the shownots to the trailer and you canfind the movie on demand, and I maybe in the theaters, if there's stilltheaters open in your area. My guess is also an incredible dremmer who hasplayed with so many great people like desel, APA, aet, zeppa, Drandaran, JoSatriani, missing persons, the motels, Steve VI and a band that I played withcalled waiting for Monday. That you've probably heard a lot about on the show,just a name of few and he's a great guy with a great story. So I hope you enjoymy conversation with Joe trowers. Much of your career has revolved aroundobviously the music of Frank Zappa Yeh, and I was wondering like how did youget to that music? When did you first hear that music and what happened toyou that you decided to kind of dedicate your entire life and career?You know in a way to to Frank Zappa and his music. Well, it started when I wasten years old in, like nineteen seventy nine yeah. I was en one thousand ninehundred and seventy nine and my main source of like music exposure around that time was myfamily. So I had A. I had an uncle who was ten years older than me. Who was myfather's brother and he was you know if I was ten, he was twenty and also mymom and dad were you know, listening to music, a lot and stuff, my dad was adrummer and he was playing music. So I was getting exposed to a lot ofdifferent stuff at a very, very early age right and my uncle. Well, basically, it was like this. Iwas hanging out at her friend's friends place and his name was Richi and he hadan older brother and his older brother used to play college radio, and it was like aSaturday afternoon- and I remember we were just hanging out at the House andhe had the college radio going to college radio and Herin Pennsylvaniawas the station that would allow for like album tracks. You know it wasn'tlike the regular pop am stuff that you...

...would normally hear righ and the songcity of tiny lights came on from the album Shakubooti and when it came on, Ijust remember just stopping everything and walkingover to the Stereo and just listening guy going like how what this isinteresting. What the Hell's this you know and the DJ said that was, forexample, with Shity the tiny light, so fom Shuti from the new album shake oubody. You know- and I was like, for example, I never I'd never heard ofthem. You know so. I went back to my uncle who, like I told you, was themain source of my. You know musical exposure at that time and I said WHO'sfor Exappe. You know I never I heard the son was pretty cool, TWAS, fring,xacpe and and he at first he was like. Oh that's,just a guy who likes the ell at his audience, which is Hilarious, but Gary Gary endedup getting that record shake your booty and when I heard that I mean I don't know if you're familiarwith that record. But you know when you're ten years old and you hear songslike Bobby Brown and broken heartsof for Assholes, and you know Mama andstuff, like that, the humor and the words and stuff would just like it wasa fog, mind, blower and me being a drummer at such an early age. I kneweven though it was like way above my head. You know I knew that the musicwas special. I just I just knew it at that young age right. So my curiosityjust went crazy and, as I got older, I just really wanted to just learn more aboutabout him and just about his music and the more that I kept getting therecords and and stuff the more that I just kept falling in love with it. Likethe world of frank, was just like such a. It was like a world that was justsucking me in and and one of the things too, that was challenging at that point.This would have been like the earlys, like her n thousand nine hundred andeight ndre and eighty two around there and stuff, and most of his records wereout of print. You couldn't get them, they were rare. You know, especiallythe sity stuff. You know there was no way you coal get that Shit, so the onlyway that you could get it is, if you like, ran across a sealed cofpy thathad been sitting in a record store forever or you got them used right. Soso it was a challenge for me to collectthe records because t that made it even more mysdifying for me, like I wantthis stuff, so bad and I can't get it right, an wat the Internet, so so that made it even more like youknow, like a thing where I just wanted to just start getting into it. So Iliterally fell fell in love and I mean simultaneously, I was distcovering somuch other music too right, but Franch Ist kept on being that guy. That keptjust grabbing grabbing my attention, and I I just kind of I just kind offell into it. Man, you know I just I just kept falling in love witheverything that I heard and then, when there's a when you look at the Cataloguand you're like Holy Shit. At that time it was like there's like fifty records.yeahcearly you'R, like you're, like Holy Shit, there's fifty records. Icould check out of this Guy Lat's, like that's like a life time of listening yeah. I can't even imagine you knowthis the time that it would take to make one song on one of those recordsand then you've got fifty. I think it's fifty six records altogether well now we're at a hundred and twentyor something like that. It's unbelievable the amount of releasesthat we have, but when he, by the time that he had passed, he was in the s hehad like sixty two or something like that: someon o. You know something likethat and I mean yeah. He had an unbelievable work. Ethic D and You knowmusic was his wife, and so it doesn't surprise me that he was releasing likethree records. You know a year. Sometimes you know because his outfutwas the same wow, that's incredible. He started playing with Z. First! Isthat right? Yes, I got. I got the gate with Amett and Dwezl Zamtas bad aboutsix months after I moved to Los Angeles in Mi in one thousand nine hundred andninety three, you know went to Berkeley, colls musicand I totally just immersed myself in differentstyles and just wanted to be a better player and it really kind of just prepare myself for the you went to Berkeley to right. I didyeah yeah yeah. We might have overlept my a semester. I was there like Nineyne ninety three yeah, so I mean that that time inBoston was really good. For me, there was a lot of benefits. It was superbeneficial for me at that time to interact with the musicians and learndifferent styles of music and and and I had set the goal like I'm going tograduate like most people were just...

...like: I'm just going to go and check itout, and then they just failed. Most guitar players went there just becauseSteve I went there. You know what I mean right, but I set the goal like I was like I'mgoing to graduate like I'm going to do this program and I'm going to get itdone and then I'm going to go out to La and just you know, and then justwhatever happens happens well. The timing was pretty amazing because bythe time I got there they were looking for a drummer. So Iyou know I just because I had met Mike Anili in Boston. While I was going toBerkeley, we had kept in touch the entire time that I was getting ready tomake that transition, and so when I moved to La Kanili, told Duisel, he waslike hey yo. Remember that Drummer Joe Travers a I told you now or whateverand he said yeah and he said well, he lives out here now. You know and hesaid well, Dude haven't Hame'n come down in audition, so it just happened.You know it just came together like that and- and I got the GIG that WS inone thousand nine hundred and ninety three and I have at look back. You knowwow in six months: that's pretty good, it's not bad. I was like so hungryThatt I would have dog was going for it like. I was trying so hard to get myname around and Yoa just play. You know how it is. You know you, and this is-and this is back when there's like again- no youtube, no Internet, no wayto have that kind of social networking. So I was the guy who was like re walking around town with a freggingpress kit with the head shot and VHS tape was my playing and a little bio,and all this shit like I was going for like I super I was so super ready andsuper into it and but yeah it's just you know, and it's funny too, becauseif you would have said like what's your ultimate gay like what is the gag, thatyou would just love to do Taf, the first thing that I would have wanted todo is to play with Wisalanava and that's exactly what happened. It's socrazy, so crazy to think about it. Now you know this all these years later,you know Yeah Wow VHS, that's pretty advanced like because everybody at thattime. You know they were like a Asett, a CD or a Cascente or something- and Iwas like fuck that I'm going to go visual like I want people to stay yeah. I had a CD, but I had like. I hadlike a thirteen minute compilation of like, like Danny Serphan call Iad worked withhim, so he called my answering machine and left a little thing on my mas e. SoI had him all spliced in with people I had worked for and then like segmentsof songs had recorded, you know, and it was all narrated by a friend of MI, soI try to go a little bit more intense to, but still just a CD. I I yeah, Ithink you Danny Saraphied man, I fuckit. I love that Guy Yeah. I love hisdrumming and that's like one of the very first guys that I'e, never that Iever like heard as a super. I mean one thousand nine hundred and seventy. Iwas two years old and my mom was playing those Chicago records. Sheloved him yeah. I was just like that was just like background music. For me,you know, and so and I've had a couple instances ofmeeting him and talking to him and he was always super cool. You know yeahhe's a great guy, but I've known him for over twenty years now and we'vejust worked on and off together and every time I'm with him I'm just like.I can't even believe that you know my name. You know what I mean. It's likeone of those, I'm sure you have the same experiences, but I'm a big FA. BigFan, the of the Dandy teraphyme Yeah Yeah Great Dude, really fun to playwith speaking of fun. To play with I mean so Dwesalandamitt I'v been. I waswatching a bunch of interviews with them today and they just seem like thecraziest dudes. That must have been just a totally nutty GIG. You know thething about those two together at that time was like the both of them together,equaled frank in a way because Asel was coming from the music side of thingswhere, like you know, just like really devoted to playing the guitar and andthe music side, not that Om, it wasn't, but but amits sense of humor and hisunpredictability and his just the sheer balls of you know just saying Ti. Hewould say at any time and stuff that dynamic mixed in with with dwezzlereally kind of again made Ma di. It was like wow, there's, frank right there.You know what I mean like those you separate them and and it's like toingredients, and then you put them together and it kind of equals. Youknow it kind of equals. What you would expect. You know right right and it wasreally fun during that time to be in that fan, because you know when theywere getting along of course, but but it was so fun because because it was just like ratifyingevery day, like I'm going to be sitting there rehearsing all this music and-and you know I canet Lese- in the band and at first it was Scott Tunos on baseand then later on and ended up being Brin Beller on base nae and- and I wasyou know great friends with all these guys, so the so the commodery was there-we were rehearsing every day the band was fucking, insanely tight, I mean sotight, so good. You know at that time and- and I just felt like- Oh my God-There's nothing that we can't do like.

We are like I'm ready to conquer theworld. With this thing, O noit was really fun. It was really fun.Unfortunately, it didn't last, you know they broke up in ninety six. You knowthat's kind of when I haw it dissolved, but but during those betwe N, ninetythree and ninety six thet was really there Wa. That ban was really special.There was something going on there. You know the timing of it was interestingtoo, because if you think about the music that was happening Erik atthat time, like you know, it was like we're coming out of thehair metal days right, we're coming out of extreme and that kind of stuff. Youknow new know and- and things like that, but you know Nirvana and Pearl Jam andtemple an the dog and all that stuff is coming around. And so it's liketransition point, and so the thing about dislananbis band is that because it wasso potent musically thatw, we kept our heads above water right instead ofgetting drowned out by the the the you know. The the SICASDINASI nails wassuper happening at that point, and I mean you know there was just like therewas a lot of room for a good good, good, good, playing rock and roll band stillright, even though it was getting simpler and Grungier and more rockingand stuff, but the but the whole hair thing was just like. We were kind oflike on the cus of the out of that right, ind, the end of the it wasinteresting, but you know it was. It was fun Whel, it lasted for sure yeah,because one of the interviews I saw was on MTV. I mean deesel still was sort ofconnected with the MTV thing, because I remember watching him on MTV growing upa lot because he was kind of a host. Really, you know like a holdway. Idon't know if he was an official VJ, but he was he like had a show orwhatever you know so it was. He was, like almost of I think, he's prettymuch an official VJ. He was on there a lot yeah and yeah. I mean that was agood time for his career because he had his sola records that were doing prettygood. You know he had a couple of them and he was on MTV like a lot getting alot of itxposure moon was around at that time with him. So you know it waskind of like the both of them right. Frank was alive and his career wastriving and NTV was was just super happening like MTV was it you know YeahOl Yeah? That was a good time for them for the Zappis Yeah. I still had musicon MTV yeah. Some people might not realize that theM actually stands for music right now. It's now it stands for monotonous, so was was frank still alive. When youwere working with them, did you get a chance to meet him, and- and I did Idid get a chance to meet him. It was very limited time, timing, wise becauseI joined in March, one thousand nine hundred and ninety three and he passedaway in December. So I didn't get. I didn't get that many opportunities, buthe did see me playing with the band and he was he was like super thumbs up,which you know made my heart. Just you know. So I was just like. Oh my God, myhero, you know and and and I did actually get a chance to sitwith them a couple times and and listen to a little bit of music, listen to himwork, and he totally knew that. I was a freak for him without me even having tosay anything like hi could just read my energy. You know like he just knew youknow. So it was pretty amazing and it's it's sad that timing wise, I just I just didn't getthe chance to have more of those opportunities. You know, but that'skind of just the way that it worked out yeah. Well, it's amazing with he guythat prolific to think about. Had He lived longer like how Longmuriel you know he was fiftytwo years old. You know like Whel e was really young and I'm fifty two rightnow right I mean, could you imagine what he would be able to do with thetechnology? The way that it is now with you know the protools and just the waythat everything is. I mean it was a pint. He was a prioneer for foreverything, digital yea, the earliest digital audio work stations in thesingle of Ber and all that stuff- and I mean yeah- I mean it's crazy to thinkabout what he could have accomplished had he had all that stuff on his side,yeah, it's almost like he knew in a way. Maybe that's why I was so prolific. Youknow, I don't know, he's gonna Hurry to get all that stuff out. You know yeahyeah crazy, but it is fun to. I was just you know going through some of therecords on spotify, because most of that stuff is up there and really funto just hear the technology in what's there and how you know he used it alland it's just each reco gets crazier and crazier. You know technology wise.It's I mean Ait's, unbelievable. No! Nobody needs my opinion on that Yoo Chimin, but it was man. It's it'spretty amazing O I haven't,...

I feel like. Maybe you can speak to it.I don't know Eyou're either as ZAP a person or you're. Not It's a particularthing. That's like you know. I think most fans come to itin the way you did where they hear that, and it's just like. Oh this is this. IsMe it's almost a culture. You know, and it's interesting that there's it e.There doesn't seem to be that many casual for enxample fans. You knowright, it's like they're, just like when they get it they're like Holy Shit.They like so they're so consumed by it. They so they're like lifers. They justgo in you know and then then then there and then orthey're, just like this. This is just way to you know: jus Humor belong inmusic. That's the eternal question. You know it's like this. Is this to goofyfor me, or this is too musically over my head, like where's, the bait youknow or whatever, like yeah, you really have to be. You really have to admirethe influences and the ingredients that make up his music in order to reallyget it. You know, like you, you know he was like classically oriented with DuWamp, an RNB and with with humor. You Know Spike Jonesand- and you know, since e, her thrown in on the side and you swirl all thattogether and it's like you know, you have to really kind of like be able torespect that stuff in order to kind of get it. If you can't, then that's okay,you know it's us not for you right, but I think it's also music. That's meantto be listened to, like you, don't throw it on, while you're bowing thelawn. What I mean are like I'm, going to do some yoga and it's not backgroundmusic. It's it's is Aman. It demands your attention, yeah, exactly yeah andthere's just man and you blink your eyes and blink your ears and you missso much. You know so much goes by so fast in a lot of those songs. It's it'spretty amazing. I was watching a lot of ZAPPA play Zappa N and you were part ofthe original lineup of that right. And yes, yes, man, it's unbelievablebecause it's it's been called like a tribute band. I've seen it, but it'sit's really not because it involves a lot of people that played with in thebeginning anyway. People that play like Terry Bozio was on it right, yea ye byand Napoleon Murphy Brock and Rey White Yeah Yeah, and then you know eventually,Esel just wanted to. You know: try to establish that unit as its own thing,without having to rely on having those guys. That was one of the things I knowthat he wanted to do and that original band you know was l really pretty special. You know. So we were, there was a lot of talentthere and there was in the beginning. There was a lot of good spirits to you know like we wereall kind of just like a team, and we wanted to do the music justice and, and we you know, I think we reallydefinitely accomplished that it wasn't easy, but but it was, it was cool. Ilasted pretty long there I stopped with them in twenty twelve or thirteen. I can't remembersomething like that. The Internet says two thousand and thirteen. Yet thankyou. Thank you. M Nemor is crazy. You know, what's crazy. Is that at thattime, when I left Zampa play Zapa, I had been playing with Resol for twentyyears. Wow, that's great ing, that's incredible! A long time just like whatwas your process, I mean obviously you're a huge fancy. You've heard thesesongs a million times but to watch everybody play this music for two hours,completely memorized no one's reading charts like what's the process of evinglearning an eigt mint I mean most of these songs are like eight minutes longon the records. Then you go live and you're doing solosm and it's a lot ofstuff to retain. You have to be that kind of musician where you've got theears to memorize things, that's the first thing and then the second thingis you just have to have the budget right, because if you have enough timeto sitthere and rehearse these people right and if they can retain this stuff,then that's what it's about it's about, having musicians that can retain it andthen having the budget to get them up and running for D and for for asignificant amount of rehearsal scence so that you can go out there and have aconfident sounding group to play the stuff. The way that it's ment to beplayed, because that was Franks Ting is like accuracy. You know that was like abig deal for him. He didn't really like a lot of mistakes. You know you reallywanted to hear the stuff played right, and so you can't like, but that wasactually Eric- that's one of the frustrations that he had with workingwith orchestras, because in the world of orchestras your O, youreally don't get a lot of reversal time right, so you know. So it's just partof this. The way that that culture works. You know you get like two twothree days, maybe Max, and then they just then you're playing with they Lifill your point, wher you're playing it. You know what I mean right: that musicis pretty demanding and frank, was pretty pretty much a stickler forwanting to hear certain things a certain way, and so you really need tobe able to like have a unit that that...

...is willing to spend the time. Love themusic enough to spend the time to make it right, and that was a lot offrustration for him- is that the orchestras didn't give a fuck. Theywere just like. This is a gig there's, this crazy music. You know: We've gottwo days to get it up and runng we're going to do the best wee can and if itdoesn't work out, they could gi. Like careless, you know Av yeah, that wasthat was tough for him, so yeah. That was like. We really wantedto just like. Do it right, you know at that time, and so did you start withthe charts like his charts? Or did you just learn it off the records or it wasboth. It was both and we also we had some advantages because we were able togo to the ashfol stems of some of the original who yeh. So we could hear isolatedparts and you know like I would have. I would have sit down meetings with likeshila and Jamie and Aaron, and I would play them like here's, the flute part.Here's the guitar, the Rism Guitar Part, you know, and they would like pick outthe notes and they write like a little cheat sheep down and then they wouldimplement that you know and stuff into into the rehearsal for the next coupledays, and we also did we actually. You know I would dip into some of theoldparts to and we would try and get some of Franks original parts that ouldthat would be written. Not Everything was written out, but if it was writtenout, you know, Gail was kind enough to let us kind of sit through the archidesand find some of that stuff. So that was super beneficial, obviously, and itkind of helped separate us from everybody else, because we had that major advantage of the stems and theparts Righ Yeh and so how much rehearsal time didit take. I believe there was months yeah yeah inthe beginning, there was months and then the unit stayed together for awhile and throughout time, no like as the years progressed and stuff, wedidn't need as much because you know we had put the time into learnmassive vocabularies worth atunents, but Jose would always like pile on thetunes you know like he was famous for like okay, here's, twenty five songsthat I want to do and we would just be like ohthe ha. You know, Jen Ri for OAo learn twenty five sons and everybody wove go ne go home, you know sheddingall this stuff and then, when the time came, we got to maybe like eleven ofthem. You know it was like so prustrate like don't pil it on man.You know like it's the worst yeah Er wors. I mean O we're all getting paideverything, but still it's like. I felt bad for everybody like going home andshedding twenty five kind of hard kind of hard songs. You know little bit. Oh my gosh yeah that trives me TNAT'sjust in general, when people bog you down so then you can't learn. You can'tspend the time on the songs that you really want to, because there's so manysongs and then, when you get to the rehersal and you're, only doing a few,it's like I could have really killed these few songs. If Yeah peabsolutely,absolutely there's no doubt about it. You know it's like yeah, it's kind oflike you know a good organizational skillslike let's just focus on these and Mak Ra est as we can be. You know yeah so when you're playing this stuff, likenormally for me, anyways, like I'm kind of just focused in on the drums,because I'm a Bass Player, I'm listening to the kick drum in the highhat and I'm just trying to lock. This music is not really like that likebecause it's sometimes it's really fucky and really groevy other times,there's lines that you're doubling with the guitar player or or just thekeyboard player so like. What's in your monitor, like what are you focused on?Do you have a general thing or you just constantly? You know? Okay, now I goeto that. Now I got to listen to this, like the soundcheck must be a nightmare.Well, you know once we went in years, we were all in eos and stuff, and so itwas like kind of like a monitor nightmare. I M Monio man nightmare, butat one point, Dwezel went with this system where everybody had their ownmixer right, so we were kind of like al coming up filing up our own things. Youknow and plus, in the beginning of the in the beginning, touris we wereplaying with video, so we were actually playing with frank which, as cool so wehad like. Like my mixer, I had a mixure. I was the one that had a mixer, my own,isolated mixure before anybody else in the band, because I was the one drivingeverybody with the click track to the video guy. So I had like a stereo mixof the band the live band fed to me from the Monitor engineer, and then Ihad one track of click and then one track of the of Frank's, vocal andguitar from the video. So I have like basically one two three like four fourtracks, that I was kind of like mixing in real time as I was playing,...

...but here's the thing during therehearsal term. I was super involved in like like to like tomake sure that everybody was playing the right shit. You know so we weredisecting everything during rehearsals, but that band was so good and soconsistent that once they got the stuff up and running, I did't really have tolike monitor that shit anymore. Like I felt like I didn't have to constantlyalmost everybody you know e once they got it up and running. Theywere there, you know, and then, by the time my first shows came, it was likewell, we did that we did the work and now it's up to you at that point, rightSoug. I didn't have to have all those instruments just blaring away. I justhad to have a really kind of you know wanted to. I wanted to fill my drumsand I wanted to just kind of get an overall, but I didn't have to haveeverything like super screaming loud and you know, and all that stuff likeat that by that time I was just kind of coasting once we get to the shows. It'sjust like just give me a good decent mix. You know av a little ambience inthere and and I'll just play the tids. You know wow well, yeah, it's another.It's amazing thing that we have youtube now to, because you know I've spentlike the last two days, just watching you play with all these different. Youknow, setups and and there's so much on there with the Zapp at plays thatbutit's really really cool yeah. That original that F, the DVD that we did.We did a DVD F from the first tour, which was shot in Portland and Seattle,and and I'm so happy that that that exists. You know some a lot of thatstuff is on newtube. Obviously the really well shot stuff and I'm gladthat that was documented, because there was so much work that went into thatoriginal tour. You know with Terry and Stevevi and all that, and so I'm soglad- and you know we want to grammy for one song which is Awhich Iswhich iscrazy. I would have never expected that at all. In fact, I didn't think thatthat was going to happen at all I didn't go. You know I was completely working at this at thehouse. The night of the grammas happened and they all went. You knoweverybody went. The entire band went except me, I didn't go and and when Iwent at the time you know working at the House that Tha House was located inLolcana right, which is now lady Gogo's house, O ow Yeah Yeah. I did hear thatactually yea, yes, so I would work up there and it was like. I didn't getreally get that good at salers cell phone response. You know up there owhen it was like seven thirty, eight o'clock or something like that. I wascalling in a night. I was getting ready, ie Druk, driving down the hill from LolCanyon. All of a sudden, you know, when is son, is my cell phone got with cellphone respons? It's just completely blew up like ading thing Ditin I waslike Ohwa Shit, my phones going crazy and then I thought, Oh, my God, we musthave won you knowonly Shit. We won he aboa, that's so cool yeah! That's agreat story! WOUL! You say you were working out thehouse, so you you are in you're th. The Vault Mister Yeah, explain to me exactly what that is, soI'm in charge of basically digitizing and documentingthe contents of the vault accumulating data and helping toproduce future projects for the trust and I've been doing it now, for youknow a long long time, Sin Ne Thousnd, nine hundred and ninety five is when Iwas one touand, nine hundred nd. Ninety five is when I started doing it andthen probably around ninety six. Ninety seven is when I started gettinginvolved in like helping out with material for releases, and then Istarted working side by side with Gail and we were kind of like a jointprofection team and we were doing releases through mail order and thenyou know you know back and forth with different record companies, and theneverything came together in two thousand and twelve, which was prettyamazing. Universal became the main record company that all the FranksCatalogu is being distributed through and an we've had a really wonderfulrelationship with them ever since, and so the entire catalog, the entirehundred and twenty some records can all be found through universal. On spotifyon your favorite streaming. It's wonderful because the longest time fansthe fans kmil that the history of the catalog is. It was kind of like dividedamongst different companies from a long time and the the cataloge was kind oflike spread. It spread out and Ome someof that was out of Prand someon. Itwas in Frand, it was kind of a mismash of contracts throughout all the yearsand by the time two thousand and twelve came everything kind of got put in one bigbasket, and we finally made it all like available through one thing and it wasa dream come true: We got to remaster the lot of the Catalogu and make itsound, amazing and kind of like you know, start from scratch and representit to the people, and it was just for me. It was dream from true. It was sowonderful to be able to have that opportunity and make that Catalogushine. And now here we are like you know, almost ten years later and it'sthriving you know withjot, so many so...

...many releasesself so but the Valt, mystarming, you know you have to like you- have to know how to handle tape. Youhave to know the different kinds of tape. You have to not ruin it becausethere's a lot of tapes that just won't play. You know a lot of these formatsjust haven't lasted over time, duing to the elements. So you really have toknow how to handle. You have to know how to run the machines, and you know,do transfers and run a data base and back everything up multiple times makesure you don't lose all your work and also you have to migrate files to themodern stuff to you know, like you know, like things that were on da Eighty,eight mat, Adat and all that stuff. If you were in that world, you have to beable to transfer that Shit and get that into way. You know waiht files and harddrives and things that are from the now right. It's so with Frank. He was doing you know: Anon tape, film, video tape,like one inchin tolinch, quid video tape, and then he was doing a lot of floppy diskstuff, and you know in the early days of digital, all floppies, which ishilarious and so yeah. It's my job to make sure thatthat stuff lives on for the ages and then Mol, and while I'm doing that ArKhiving away I'm. You know now joint joint producer with Amit Zapa,who is in Amaan Devar in charge of the Zepatrus currently, and so we as a teamwork with Pris, as presenting these latest releases, the things that havebeen coming out now, ecause gale has passed, you know, and so she's not here,and so so that's wher wee had these days andit's been going great wow and how did that come about? Did you apply in La Weekly? No, so we a beon thedrummer right for omen and desal. I was at the house a lot just kind ofrecording there and just you know, being at the House and Fram afterfranket passed, there was a crew of people that he left behind. You knowtechnician an engineer secretary, a bunch of a bunch of people, and so obviously that was you know aroundthem and one day I just kind of couldn't help it any longer. I was likeplease take me down on the vault I woul. I just would love to see the bault. Imean anybody, that's a super fan, that's like you know going to thefreaking candy store. You know exactly so so theybought. They brought me downthere and I was like just kind of like looking around with my eyes wide openand my jaw hitting the floor. Going Holy Shit. Look at all of this stuffand, like I just I was like I was like. Oh my God, you know what this is, andyou know what this is like. Just reading the sides of the spines of thetape boxes. I was like. Oh my God. Oh I got, and so they went back and told Gil.They said, Hey desls drummer knows a lot about what's in the Valt, and soshe goes great he's the Waltmeister ahaaaand. The next thing I knewliterally the next thing I knew I was you know I had a keen to the ball and Iwas standing in the vault by myself. With a pan of paper and a pen, I had nocomputer skills, what'Soever Wel, very minible, very vinable experience withtape very minimal, and it was on the job, training man I went for it. Youknow I had. I had the luxury of knowing a lot of the history of music right, soI instantly started like you know: learning how to run a database learninghow to run a computer learning, how to run tate machines learning how to notfuck up tapes. I learned from the best you know I justyeah, so it was. It was quite an unbelievable experience.You know to think back on it now, but yeah. That's how that's how it happened.Wow and you and you say vaults, so- was it stored in the proper way, even likeas it's yeah basement or is like it was a. It was a underground vault that wasbuilt underneath the house and it was cine AF controlled, an concrete, and unfortunately it did have a little bitof leaks here and there. So when it rained it was a total nightmare, but but for the most part, that stuff was was kept under lockand key and a gooddecent climate controlled area. So he knew that he needed to protect all thestuff and he ha kind of set up. Here's what's interesting about that is. Hewas one of the first artists in in music history to obtain the rights toall of his original master tapes, so like in Earl, like probably eighty or eighty one, hewon a lawsuit that cauht all the original tapes from MGM verb in the Sand all the warder brothers tapes and all that stuff. He was able to get allacquire all that stuff and I think boi might have been one of the secondpeople to do that or whatever to do it.

You know an L, they all make deals withRigo Disk and started reissuing all this thing. You know all that stuff onthose early days in in the s but but yeah. So so, like all those master,tapes ended up being in his possession, and so he just started. You know he didn't reallyspend too much time doing a lot of vault work because he was really kindof interested in doing new new music, but he knew that there was a anaudience for those old old recordings, and so he kind of you know devotedsometime, doing volve stuff, some some time to doing interviews, sometimes odoing television sometimes doing screem plays and his own new music. I mean itwas just nonstop non stopped incredible. The work ethic was he, he wasn't adrinker or like. Was He one of those clean and sober dues that just workedall the time? Totally I mean he was. He would have like a Margarita or a littleosome red wine. You know socially or whatever, but no he wasn't interestedin getting fucked up. You know for him, it was about cigarettes and double espressos right, that was food, food and water, doublees, rea, Sevin, sigarettes wow, that's awesome, yeah! So it's it'squite a responsibility that that was bestowed upon you. It really is, and it's funny because, like you know, whenyou're in it you, you know that you've got a job todo and and you're just kind of grinding away and stuff, but when I, when I doreflect when I do look back on the amount of stuff I've been involved withand the opportunities and it's just like S, it's it really is a mindblowerlike it's just yeah were super super super incredible to think about the thegifts you know to be able to have this opportunity to just be involved in such an amazinglegacy. You know yeah, and so you probably digitized that very first songthat you heard as that. Little Kid, that's right! THAT'S PRETTY INSANE!That's that's right! Yeah! When wet, when we remastered the the cataloguefor two thousand and twelve, it was so crazy to just go to the original tapesand retransfer them all. You know one by one, each record ea it was. It wasso great ais, just amazing yeah, you know. What's amazing Eric is, like youknow, frank with such a master, at Rasor, weight, editing, right and andwith protools. You know what it's like to do: Editing in protels. Obviously,no and that's that's like so convenient so the way to go. But you know, cuttingtape was an art right and he was such a master at it and when you put theoriginal masters on some of these records up and you let them Pliyh andyou see the the Tae- the tape edits going by you're, just like Oly Shit,like the amount of the amount of time spent on just sitting there- and youknow because, like literally like bars of music being cut together, it's justit's really insane man, it's unbelievable and he did I he did ithimself, yeah wow. I guess it's sort of the modern day or modern day. Then nowit's now it's even obslete now, but at that point the modern day equivalent ofbetovan sitting at a piano with a with a pencil. You know srring out everylittle detail of the thing yeah with a razor blade and tape and yeah. Well, first, he did that. First,he sat and wrote the little God fhon paper right and then het. It becameyeah yeahhecause. The Razor Blade was an instrument yeah wow, that's crazyand a lot star, a los start nowadays yeah these kids. Today, man, they justhave no clue. AAASO thereare a lot of us out of work right now, waiting toget back to playing, shows and touring, and I know I've had to do whatever. Ican do to take my mind off the situation from time to time and one ofthe ways to pass the time is to catch up on some books. You've missed. But ifyou're like me- and you don't love to read, there's another way you can consume.AUDIBLCOM has thousands of titles to choose from including audiobooks aboutmusic production, songwriting, the music business, music theory,instructional, audiobooks and biographies of your favorite musicalheroes. But besides audio books, you can also listen to podcast, theatricalperformances, alist comedy and exclusive audiooriginals. You won'tfind anywhere else right now. You can get a free, thirty day trial if youvisit, audible, Trialcom, dive bar rock star, that's audible, trialcomdive barrock star, and you can catch up on your audio reading. I'd like to take a second to thank youfor listening to the Diebar, rocks our podcast as a new podcast, getting theword out as a vital part of what it takes to keep the show on the road...

...or off the road as the current case.Maybe if you would like to support the podcast all you got to do subscribewherever you listen, and if you have an extra minute or two nlease leave areview, you can also share and follow the podcast onyour social media, APPs, okay enough begging, I hope you'rehaving fun and once again thank you for listening. So I wanted to kind of get to the t eband that I've I'm very impressed that you played withbecause I'm a huge fan. I only saw them once in the s and you were the Drummer,Oh really and, and that is Drendaran yeah. Howdid that Kay? Come up? Okay, so the first GIG that I ever played withWizalamat with Z, was in mayor June, or something like that F ofon one thousand nine hundred and ninety three at a club in La called club, Lonjere right, I think, hat's on the Internet. Actually, I think I watchthat today. That's right! That's right! There is. There is some stuff on therefrom that's right, that's right, yeah! So that was an epic night for me,because that was like my first professional gig. You know firstfucking outing with the band I'm twenty three years old, I'm fresh in town, I'mjust like I'm ready, you know and in the audience was like celebrity aftercelebrity, it was completely packed Wer Ayenga tit. was there Chris Robinsonfrom the black crose? was there you know a lot of the ZAPA families?Friends were there and frank was there which is pin soinsane and Warren Kukarula? was there and sat with frank and gale at thetable? Rest. You know up there in the balcony and you know frank was like wowthat drummer and Warren s like yeah that drummer. So Warren asked me if I'dbe interested in coming to London and do his solo stuff, because Duran was ina hiatis because they used to wait so long for Sigmon to come up with lyricsfor the new stuff. They would just be in a holding pattern and Waran use toget really frustrated, so he was like I want to play. You know like I want toplay. I want to do my stuff, so so I used to go in one thousand, ninehundred and ninety five in one thousand nine hundred and Nety like that, yeamlike ninety five and ninety six around there I used to go to London and playthese solo gigs with with a trio. It was nick bags. You knowt nick bags, Idon't know and Dick bags prays with stepen Wilson now, but he was inKajagoogo Ohas base. Pa Yeah Cause you so so nick it was me Nick and Warrenand we were doing like you know, trio gigs in London, wow and so so that'skind of how it started and then you know West Way, Miller. Yes, so I neveractually met him, but I saw him Bat Berkeley. I was at Berkeley with himand okay. You know about him right. Yes, absolutely! I told Warren, I said: Well,listen! If you ever decide that you want to do some gigs in the states. Youknow in La or whatever I said: I've got the base player for you, so you don'thave to bring nick over. You know and spend the money. I said I've gotsomeone here, so I introduced thim to wes, so it was West and I and Warrenplaying gates together, okay, doing hit doing his music and then John Taylor,bailed on Drandran in one thousand nine hundred and ny six or ninety, seven,okay, so so west got the call right. So West now is in Deranderan wow, and Iwas like. Oh my God. That's so great! You know I'm so happy for you, men, youknow, and they toured you know, fo ninety seven and maybe a little bit ofninety eight or whatever, and then in ninety nine. They had a kind of a tourscheduled and their drummer got into a schedulingconflict with Jeff Beck because he was playing with back, and so I wake up oneday and there's a message on my machine and it's Warren saying Joe the time hascome man you need, give me a call and then rightafter that was west going Joe Oly Shit. Man You're not going to believe this,but Warran just called me and Yo go, and I was like. Oh my God, it'shappening like I like. I knew it, I knew what was going on. You know rightso the next thing I knew man I you know I had a tiket to go to London and Iwent and I learned all the material and they played and it was totally cool,and so I ended up being. I ended up doingthat: GIG FRM, one thousand nine hundred and ninety nine two thousandand one and in two thousand and one that was when dran decided to do areunion with the original cats right. So waren Westond myself were out of aout of a job at that point, but that...

...was cool. You know it was an amazingamazing experience, two years of two years of that you know yeah, and and sothat's how that's how it came. That's how it came together and were you a fanbefore that? Or is it just just a GIG? You know I wasn't a super fan duringthe S M, but when warenenjoined yeah I started you know, like kind of like I startedlistning a little more because, like you know, come on, let's face it, comeundone and ordinary world and notorious, and you know that kind of stuff thoseare, those are really good, songs, yeah and he he was responsible for he was abig deal. He was a big part of the kind of comeback of Drand Aran. During thattime, like the wedding album, you know I yeah absolutely yeah, so so theirmaterial. Like I really liked the thank you record, which was the cover record.You know I was liking everything that was happening, so I was definitely more interested in that stuff, but ollproblem learning the ety stuff. I mean it was fun, like you know, learninggirls on film and planed earth and yeah all that stuff. It was all Super SuperFun music to play, so it wasn't like it was a Bumm out at all. It was justgreat, you know, yeah, I'm and you know as a fan of Drandaran. It was cool whenthey all reunited and everything, but I always think about waren too, becausehe was such a big part of the band for a long time like heasin hat ban fora adecade over a decade right, yeah, absolutely absolutely and they wrotesome great music together. Yeah Wa Warren is O he's a just a he's, aninsemely, talented person. You know yeah, so there their time they produce somegreat music during his time and where they still, you know, they're legendaryfor parties and women, and was it still crazy by the time you got inthe band,it was still crazy, it was fun yeah I mean it was all it was all you know,respectful and everything you know, but it was, but it was yeah I was it wasinsane. I got to live out my rock and roll fantasies. You know beanding thatBa you know I was Simean. I had hair at that time and I was I was sinner and Iwas in good shape and I was dressing up and glamming it up. You know, because Igrew up. I grew up with Alice Cooper and t rex and sweet and all those Glam.You know I was a Glam rocker at shot. You know that was like and I loveMarilyn Manson and I love nine inch nails and I love stuff like that. Right rock fantasy stuff is, like you know,the Good Shit, that's tha, that's the stuff that I used to really really loveand so wow. You know next thing I know like wow, I can actually get otherpants and I can wear a Turkoi sufficien at o, the top and afeather, Boa and I'll be okay. In this Ba you almost have to to keep the GIG. Itwas so fun like. I remember you know West and I sitting during rehearsalswhen there would be a little bit of ofttime. You know like we play for acouple hours and then we get some food and show out right and when we would bechilling, they'd be doing business in the other room or whatever you knowlike cupphone calls and whatever they be doing an west, and I would be in thein the green room painting our dails EA. It was so great, so yeah I mean I met some really reallygreat people. You know they had a pretty strong fan base and touring touing. During that time I madesome. I made some friends. It was really fun, that's cool yeah and how isNick rodes as a keyboard player, he's good, he's minimalistic, but buteffective and classy. You know and Devonair and- and he was my favorite- he was my favorite.You know yeah, like I like talking with him. We had a lot musically in common,even though I was kind of like a- I don't know, maybe ten years youngerthan him or more probably, but I grew up on a lot of the same stuff that helike the stuff that he was listening to when he was. You know a young teenagerand stuff like if he was sixteen. You know I don't actually really knowexactly how old he is, but I'm gonna assume that like when he was sixteenand listening to boy. I was six or seven listening to boy because of myuncle being ten years older than me and Exposing Med all this great shit, soall the stuff that he was into that turned him into the musician that he is.I was also listening to at an awkwardly young age right so o. So we had that incommon, and I think that that was like it kind of bonded us a little bit itwas. It was cool like you know, he liked a lot of the same shit that I didso it was. It was great that we have that in common now, Simon and I, on theother hand, was Thi ue, that's a Differento, you know, but, but you know in the end, Sion was verycomplimentary about my drumming, which...

...end a lot to me and so that you know I came. I came out ofthat whole experience feeling like. I know that I did a really good job andthat they were really happy and that as ultimate at's. Ultimately you know thatmakes me feel good about. I about all of it. A and I got to have a blast hada last attr. You know, and it happened at a time in my life where it was like.It was perfect because I was like thirty one or thirty two years old andI could still play the part of being a rock star. If I wanted to you, know,habesat and but but yet I hadn't had. I had never played to like, like shows to that extent of likescreaming people right. I can remember walking out on stage and the screenswere so loud that, like my fucking ears, would bottom out like it was so loud,it hurt M Oy Shit. This is what t at that's what this sounds like Ra aa aand you probably were not in years. At that point, I wan I Wasi Oh gotyou yeahyeah, but I would have them. Oh, you have to be yeah, yeah e tracks andstuff ig t every song on that gag, except for maybe one or two was wher,the click right so and that was cool. It was cool with me. I didn't mind ityeah right. Well, that's kind of why I asked about Nickros because back in theday I remember Roger with the big headphunes you know, so they were oneof the first bands that are are using a click all the time and because nickrosactually had a computer like a like a you know, crt monitor on the stage youknow early on and I'm always wondering like how much is he playing and howmuch is it? You know, and it's I'm sure it's all his craft work. You know well that's afunny phrase but yeah Yuter Music, but anyway o you know how much is heplaying and how much is the computer playing, and so obviously there wouldhave to be inears or some kind of headphones. It was happen. Halfhonestly like there was a lot of tracks. Thit was a lot of background vocals anda lot of keyboard parts and pads, but but he was also you know, playing livewith it. Yeahi remember he had this really cool thing that he would put its hand infront of, and it would o you know. Yes, I de that yeah. So he was doing thatkind of Shit and just like looking amazing, you know like and taking hisfinger and going poop and then you know a sound would happen and he'd still belooking amazing and he'd never finger up to his ear, he's listning attentlyand it w there's the next sound. You know perfect Ih, yeah, yeah, so cool, and soyou know I don't know great bandto. Just I literally love how the parts allentertwined and like no matter whether he's playing it or not like even ifit's a simple part, it's like they all work, it's well produced stuff. Youknow they really are a interesting band in the in the way that their parts allwork. You know, but well as a base player, I mean you have to admire thoselines and those Areleedsi about it. I think he's most the most underratedbase player in rock history. Honestly, like really try to play that stuff.It's one thing to listen to thit and if you think it's cheesy pop music, thefine. You can think that it'll come across like that, but try to play Rio,Yeah Wase. You know that baseline is no joke. It is happen. You know, Yeah S,yeah, yeah, absolutely, but west nailed it. The night that I saw youhe was areally great base player, and you know you know him from Berkeley right yeah.We met it, Berkeley in one thousand, nine hundred andninety and I played with them and I was like holy.Should I started introducing him to everybody. You know like this. Kid Isfucking amazing. He had like a yellow factor base ever those yeah Y Hav, yellow one of those I think orblack one. I can't remember Andand- and you know I mean like you know: all youhad to do is listen to him and you knew that he was talented. You know yeah soand I moved out to Los Angeles n one housand, nine hundred and ninety twoand it wasn't very long that he followed yeah so yeah, I'm pretty sure.I'm pretty sure I came out first, but yeah he didn't have to worry. Allpeople had to do was listen to him play and he would get gids. You know he wasjust so good. It's so so sad that he had that he left us at such an earlyage yeah. It was a real superloss of of talent and a super super sweet guy,yeah I' misswest yeah. I met so nats a way of cancerright yeah. It was like phiroid stuff, yeah, yeah yeah. I saw him play bunchof time bease. I was actually there Berkely, but I one time I specificallyremember I was s the first time I saw you play actually because it was BrianBellers, another base player F on Birtday, his senior recital yeah.Remember, toting out you whoad come back, you had graduated but came backto play that and as in the room and the...

...and he and West did a base. Duet duringthat, you know is really really cool. He did. They did a a better mouse trapby John John Panetuchi. That was one of Yeah Yeah Yea Yeah Yeah Great Great Times Yeah. I remembercodt Brian had miles you know on his honis airline account. They flew me back and it was so was sonice to come back and play that show and be around everybody again. You knowyeah yeah, yeah Berkeley, it's cool. Did you have a good time there I lovedBerkeley, I loved it. You know I had. I had an amazing time there I was. Iwas super super busy, though, like I had a gay, I was working at towerrecords the entire minth entire time that I was there. I had a job, so I wasworking antire records and I had a girlfriend and I was going to school,so it was just like non spap. It was really I mean being that young. You canhave you can have that kind of Lifestilan because T it. It wasliterally every day like non nonstop, but it was fun. He's mentioned itbefore, but it was a great time to be a Berkeley. I think you know Berkeley wasnow it's massive. It's this big huge they've taken over all of Backbay, andit's really expensive. I mean it was really expensive, then, but kind of notlike it is now- and I don't know, Boston was a cool place and I reallyhad a good time. Wasn't there as long as you, but I had a really great timethere to Realy et's talk about that for a second okay. Okay, so so, yes, Bostonis an amazing town. I Love Boston. I enjoyed my time there so much, but Idid when I was on tour with. Was He Ezampe, Pluzambera, Jo Satrionni? Ican't remember which one it was, but I went back to the to that area back bay.You know that that street Masshav and Newbury and that just that whole areathere right rn. I went I went back there one afternoon just to like havelunch and to walk around and see. T was going on around there because I hadn'tbeen there in so long and it was Super Sad. It was super disappointing andbecause I mean when I was there, it was like musician heaven yeah had like three different music stores. You hadlike Daddy's junking, music and Jacks drumshop and Mandy's Mannis, Ou, rightand all this stuff, and then you had record chops. You had luni tunes, whichwas a cool record shop, and then you had tower records on the corner there,which was huge, and then you had niberi comics down the street. So you havelike three cool record shops to go to yeah h. There was, like you know, like col places, to eat, topizza shops and like whatever means, yes, yeah and and so like there was likethere was like so much to do. If you were a musician like there was so muchenergy there, and all of that is gone like all of that is gone. You know,Jacks trumshop is gone. Man He's Dr. you know. All the music stores are gonetower. Records is gone, yeah, newbrade comics is still there. looning tunes, Idon't think, is there most of the restaurants are now likechain like of like there's a McDonald's and there'sstill, I think, the pizza shop, but everything else got bought out by theschool and it's like you know how many places do you need in order to buybooks right or sweatshirts that say Berkeley on and it's like. It's like.Oh my God, and you know, New York City has turned that way to, like, Iremember going to New York City in the S, and there was great great places togo check out if you're a musician just like there were tons of places to play.If you're a musician, you know cool classic bars. But then, like you know,if you went down to stm St Mark's place, there was like trash and Bogville andall these great cool stores for clothes and and record shops, and all thatstuff and now at video stores and media and all that Shit and now all thatShit's gone and everything you know all the venues are bought up. You know,like all the classic venues are gone. All all the record spors are gone.Everything's got it's like how how many starbucks do we need? You know it'slike yeah yeah, true. Well, I wonder how much this covid thing isgoing to change everything and this massive break right now of us, likeeverything being put on hold everybody, taking a step back from this crazy,materialistic sort of life that we've we've grown accustomed to and now you're having to deal with somepretty heavy stuff with this virus and everything I don't know, I wonder ifthat's Goinna shake some soul back into some people.I don't Know Oi hope that you know the people are realizing how much they missmusic live music. You know and like going out and seeing bands play andconcerts and all that stuff, like you know, out of our culture and I'm hopingthat people aren't be like hey we've been without it. This long, we don'tfucking need that Shit. It's like come on. You Know Yeah Yeah. Well, I thinkit's going to be just the opposite. I...

...think people are just champing at thebit to get back into it. You know what I mean like every time we even open upa little bit. It's like people fluv to the clubs. You know people are justanxious to get out, and these these driving theater shows that have beenhappening there. Selling out and people are, are really missing it and you knowwe're guys who tour still and I've been for the last three years, touringhardcore like a hundred and tity five shows a year, and that's so great that Youyeah andthere's o know plenty of people doing it and people are still selling outshows you know what I mean it's like. It's might not be as big as it used tobe, but people there is still fandom out there somewhere. You know yeah andnow that they can't do it they're going to be. You know it's going to be offthe chain whence this thing opens up again. I think I hope I do to I do toofor sure yeah yeah, so crazy. Well, well, anyways back to you. How do we get back, my God? Well, I wanted to also kind ofconnect like Warren, Cukarilo, missing persons, Yeph Tapa, it's allsort of Zapra related. STILL THAT'S RIGHT! It's ten erended and Zapacontinuehim. It's so true! Yeah Frank is, like you know, there's a thread inOen so much that leads back to him. You know and how much he touched so muchand so yeah that you can't Cape at it's. So true, all these Greaty, all thosegreat musicians that came through his band that went on to have their owncareers. You know, and, and so the tree has so many branches and when you lookat it, when you look at how many you know, wonderful, wonderful things thatis spawned through the three decades of frank being around it's, it's superimpressive and you know another thing, that's really amazing is how wellrespected and revered Franik is, and you know another thing too. I will saythat about Drandram yeah, I remember Eric when I was on the road with thoseguys and we would be playing like you know, like some shows, with other bandson it. Like I remember we were doing some festivals or something and Hen. Wewould be doing some special engagement and there would be some bands of thenow that would be on the on the build with us like Worg, emember them and all that stuff.Like there'd, be all these bands that were like you know than aen. You know othe now and they would be on the bill with us and then, like I remember justlike they all just wanted to come and say hello and meet them and pay theirrespects and just be like you guys were like so you know, and I used to justsit in the back and you know, have a glass of mine and just watch all thatkind of stuff and they were- and you know, Simon, a and nick were alwaysvery, very sweet to those people. You know all the Dans all the differentbands that wanted to come and meet them, and I just remember being like yeah.You know these guys are like you know: they're well respected, they're, well,revered, like you knowthe, you know it's true and I'm Surei'm sure it'sstill to Thi Dat yeah. Well, I think that the war in years helped to justsolidify that because they kept going, they weren't. Just this passing thingthanks to him coming in and them having hit songs. You know- and it's just thiswhole, like you said this whole other part of their Catalogu. That makes thema much rounder package. You know what I meanand Iot, seeing the show and being so relieved that they did everything thatyou guys did everything to it was like there was girls on film and Rio, andyou know new moon on Monday and like well all those records that youmentioned before, but it was all in there and you and you really hear apretty amazing book. You know what I mean. It's a pretty incrediblecatalogue. Yeah, you know definitely yeah. That was quite an experienced man.I was so again that's like one of those things where I look back and I just amso grateful and blessed that I have that opportunity to do that. You know to be a part of anorganization that was successful, yeah successful and I look kind of like alegendary band. You know, yeah absolutely was really. It was real cool.I did a a short tour with ABC from the Yeahmartin FRY and IGRONA thing. Just abig s get a show, so there was in fact the g, the ging, the one of the lastGames we placed was in Vegas at the the Manala Bay, Oh yeah, and at the youknow the stage out in the out in the out in the swinming pool stuff anyway,and it was a there was probably twenty ats on the show it started at like twoin the afternoon, and we went on at ten. You know what I mean yeah across thestreet. An in the big concert stage was Deranderan: Oh just Deranderen, youknow what I mean so that I think, is what that's when you can really tellcere here's a bunch of other ats bands,...

...all fitting on the same bill.Derandaren is selling out tenzand seads. You know by themselves, because they'rethey've just reached that kind of status. You know totally on he rememberthe album M: how to be a millionaire by ABC Yeah Yeah. We played that songactually love that I love that Ryah. Oh Man, Dude. That was probably that wasthat tour was three weeks longbecause you know is Martin Fri and his guitar player. Matt backer came fromEngland and then Matt, Rodie and guy from tonic Pete Moloney on drums really reallygreat, but they HAV did. They have a fax player at that time. Well, actually was it was it gym? Ah e Yeah Ji Miller came and yeah e wasamazing. Is it was anyways? It was dream Gig for me and like if all thegigs, that I've done. You know that three weeks of time and we were wearingsuits and it was just like te nern shoot that poison arow I mean we just did all the songs you know andbecause we were the sort of the headliner most of the time. So becauseMartin had like five hits, you know with you know when smoky sings and the lookaBlo eokell yeah, so we actually did a little set and then sometimes we woulddo like an hour seit at certain venues you know, but when it was the big longshow, everyone would come out and play their one hit. You know, and sometimesit was to attract or whatever. Then we get to them to us, and it was like youknow: W We'd have five or six songs on a long show and it' so anyways it was just. It wassuch a blast. I'm such an as pop nerd, Yo, kN, so Nowo, and then my wife sawme play with them and she's like. Oh, I understand you so much better now, just watching me up there, I'm like now,I'm in my element put me and put me in a suit. You know playing this musicunbelievable. It is so it fun. There was a time there in the late s andearly tands, where I started playing like a lot with aty's bands like itjust kind of happened like I was in, I did a gay with Berlin just one and then I did the motel. OhMan, that's Righta. I saw that on your resume somewhere that cool I likeMartha, Shewas Great. Then, of course, you know I killed in for Terry on themissing persons thing, so that was kind of Hilarious Ois, like all of a sudden,like all these ates things were like popping up all these eigties werea lotof aties work back man, I'm happy about it. It's like I'drather go. Do that. You know there's just a different feeling when you're,even if you're playing like a modern, the bige, if you were on Lady Gaga, forinstance, right now or whoever the biggest riata or whatever it wouldn'tfeel the same as playing that music that you grow up with. You know what Imean yeah, it's a different thing: it's a little more fun in a way. Yeah it'got that whole NASTALGA thing, and it was part of you. You know, so it's likemore fun to play that music, because it's like you just love it, and this islike why I play music. You know what I mean yes and if you're you know luckyenough to be able to play music like that for a living. Then it's like atthat point. It's like no even work. It's just like, Oh my God, you're justkind of fun, and that's that's a great that's a great time right. There yeahthat's what it's like for me to play: Franks music, because I just love themusic so much it's just like it's not even work. It's like I just I'm, I'mliterally playing stuff that I love. So you know it's great to tell you thetruth, like I was saying to I've. I've never been a Zappa fan so for the lasttwo days of because I want to be prepared. I tend to do my research onthese things. You know so few days, I've just been watching and learningand reading and and there's so many things like I'v started. Reading aboutyou know Warren and then reading about TerryBosio, who I knew a lot about, because ye can't go to Berkeley without knowingabout Terry Bosio. You know just ta education about Zappa and justbeing reminded and then learning a lot more is, is so cool and and it's Idon't know, it's just really cool that your dream artist you've been able tobe so involved with like Congratulatonak advantage. I know it'slike it's like fate, almostit's, just kind of just like sitting there. Youknow. I really truly believe that, like if you're, if you know, if you're, notan asshole and if you really do have h the talent or the goods to set your setof goal and try to achieve back a little right, I think that anything'spossible. You know, I really do. I think that you know you can really. You can reallyaccomplish some things. If you, if you just you know, are together and andpeople people's going to call, you know people are going to call you back ifthey, if they like you and if they and if they also like they, don't what youhave to offer. Musically too, you know it's just like it can just happen. Youknow yeah. I was just really fortunate and Lucky and grateful and Blesse andall that stuff and I'm just so glad...

...that I've been able to keep keep a keep making a living, yeah yeah. So that's a steady gig that it'slike a yeah, it's a balleried position or something yeah, yeah, really greatyeah Ek. Well, there's a lot to be done. You know, there's a lot to be done,we're working on so much! You know that the for, like the last five years,there's been a documentary ind, the works on Frankapple and it's finallycoming out itwill be available on November onThanksgiving as we're saying, franksgiving Nice, but it's yeah it'sfinally going to be available to stream, but it has been playing at some various.You know you had mentioned some of the dried en theaters and don and as therehas been some festivals, that has happened over the past couple monthsthat it that has been playing at, but it's sad because obviously with covidand everything like it didn't get the true chance to do. The theater runswhich is sucks but but finally it I it is coming out. So you know we'reexcited about that, and then we had a soundtrack that we put together thatwe've been working on, and so it's been it's been a lot of work, but it'sfinally actually going to be happening. So that's exciting that if you get achance you should check the movie out. It's really well done it's it's just alittle over two hours. You know you could do seven hours on the guy and itwouldn't be enough, but yeah, but it's, but it's a nice. It's a nice chunk of of well done documentary. So if you geta chance, you know U, Oh no, I'm I'm a documentary junkie, so I will will bewatched by me. Col excelent, especially now that I've been primed by all thisresearch yeah. No, I think you'll love it. Let me know if you get a chance tosee it, you know just Fucki Dro me a text and be like dude. I T I saw it.You know whatever yeah absolutely so so. Give me one good like diva SimonThe bond story. Ayou brought it up that he wasn't so good to. I God. Oh, my God,I remember I remember like after gages and stuff like if we had any like backstage parties or, like youknow, like I remember just having such a great time at the House of Blues andChicago, because there was the big room connected to you know to the to thevenue which was part of the building, a part of the Houseo Blues. So theeverybinow all the backstage peoples- and you know, people from the audiencethat were lucky enough to get in there. And then everybody was back there andI'd be like you know. I connect with a girl and I'd be talking to her andstuff and like I'd literally Ben, just like in the middle of saying hello, youknow, or you know whatever, and you know I like y know were eite. I werebright in front of each other and SILENC would come and walk right infront of me and go heano. I'm Simon- and I just remember, like looking likethis past this shoulder looking at her, going to believe that Shit like illk- Oh my God, yeah the OK, Bocker fol Aoon Wow ookay. So it's like that yeah I mea come on Dude Youre Simin, the Bongof good! You can go, have anything yeah o! I you mind if I just have like.Maybe one wow, oh man. Well, this has been awesome.Talking to you, man, Oh de, that I remember, I met you. The first time Iactually played with you were playing out the brass elephant: Yeah God yeah with Botty Williams, andotherfellows passed away, but I've told the story on a differentepisode actually, but I remember the first time I play with you: U The wholefirst set Wewere, it's the first set, not many people in the club, and youknow you're playing everything, just pretty much pocket stuff and a decentvolume, and I was like that's cool but like where's, this Jew traver that I'veheard so much about you know I hen like the last song. I don't evenremember what it was, but you just opened up and like just you know, blew some chops and I waslike Oh vhariis like Oh, it's like that, like this suit is Badass and you're.Just absolutely amazing. Drummer and Bols had a great time playing with. Youare Youd to well, I guess were no one's playing anywhere, but you're stilldoing the patches gig. If the club Er openip at the time that everything kindof grinded to a halt, I was, I was doing Tuesday nights at thewhiskit Gogo with the ultimate jam night from the House dormer for thatright, and then I was the first call for the pum shows on Fridays andSaturdays with Eric Dover and Jim Wheeler and Cocoa Powel and timesWalter Email, depending on schedules right who I'm interviewing on Thursdayhe'll be on notthat next week. I love...

Walter, such a sweetheart in andanother talented cat now nother, another amazing musician, and so that was like the two, the twosteadies and and then you know we had a tour. TheZAPBIBAND was supposed to be opening up for King Crimson in the summertime andthat completely got postponed and we still don't know whether or not or whenthat's going to be rescheduled. You know right. Hopefully it will be, butyou know you just just don't have any idea so yeah we're in a holling patternbut yeah. It was weird because I was so used to like you know, grinding away onthe day job and then at night you know going and higging and and stuff likethat and then now it's like all O ud. All of a sudden. I've got all thisextra time like I don't have any extra money, but I'mgot all this secor time. I know it's crazy. I mean first atfirst I was really loving it because, like I said I was touring really hardcore. So at first for the first, even two months I was like. Oh, this breakis awesome, but man like maybe six weeks ago, I just did a wall of like Igot at I gotta get out and I got ta play I. This is the longest in thirtyyears that I've gone without playing a GIG. It's really crazy. I hope that youknow things will will obviously change and I meany it might not be changingany time soon, but I do hope that when it does change that Iu al like we said,people will still be able to appreciate what you know. We have to offer as livemusicians and the industry will kind of come back around and and people want. ITor again and you know, and just and just do music yeah yeah well, I hope we get to do some musicwhen it all starts up again and yeah I was Goingno say I was really happythat I had the chance to record that record, W th with what is it waitingfor Monday yeah waiting for my name yeah. I felt so good man, man and then that Gi get the whiskey andand yeah yeah. That was really fun yeah. I forgot about that too. We do allkinds of stuff. Together we OI just hoally. That band is really strong. Imean between you and August yeah and an Brady. I mean it'sjust like Holy Shit. Man, you guys are just like O, come on yeah. No atgreatAnn Walter Al Right, yes, yeah yeah, it's pretty insane, it's cool! Well,hopefully, they'll be they'll, be gigs to be had eventually and we'll get allagain. You know yeah. Well, good luck with all the podcast stuff and I'm gladyou're. You know you're game proactive and came in busy and interacting withyour fellow musicians, and you know the keep keeping things happening. You know just likegenerating awareness, hit's, great yeah and Sho case in people that a reallyrespect- and you know it's good to- like you say- just keep in touch and beable to talk to people, because it's so isolating you know being out out herein pandemic land. Yes, but I appreciate you wanting to have me on well thanks,so much for doing a man, it was great talking to you. Thank you flood to the clubs, not flub to theclubs. I don't know, I don't know what I was talking about man. I hope you got a lot out of that.That was so fun I loved it. He was talking about demotapes because it's asubject I kind of forget about because now everything's online and it's a kind of a different world, butI'll try to put my first lost Angeles demotape on Youtube. So you can hear itjust in case anyone's interested. I haven't heard it in years, so I'm notsure if it will even hold up, but y'all listeners can be the judge of Tha. Andlet me know it was always a interesting conversation to have amongst musiciansabout like what form of Demo they used to use, because some people wouldinsist that you need one and like a cassette or a CD, and others wouldinsist that you don't and you just sit in a and have a business card. You knowand there's always a danger of over promoting yourself for sure, but it'salso always good to have something just in case to put in somebody's hand likesomething that you can just take with you, because you get in your car andyou throw it there and then maybe even week later youyore like what is this.Who is this? And you come back to it obviously noweverything's on the web, so it's good to have a business card with contactinfo and links to you know website or youtube or whatever you use sound cloud.I've also done postcard size stuff, which you know, sticks out a little bitmore and depends on the event that you'r you're going to like. If you goto NAM, that's people have bags there anyways, so something a little biggeris kind of acceptable and you don't always have to hand them out either,but you should always have them so just incause you need to so you know youdon't want to Overdo it, but it's always good to have in case someoneasks, and video right now, obviously is...

...super vital. So Joe was way ahead, thegame and that that's pretty cool the last few gigs I've gotten they'veasked to send links to video as well as audio. So obviously it's you got tohave something and if you have any ininnovative ideas on the subject orsomething that you do different, you know feel free to reach out and let meknow- and maybe we can have this discussion on the show again. One otherthing I'll say about it too, is that it's really grueling and not fun. Forme anyway, it s like it is the most awful part about getting gigs and stuffis the schmoozing and the meeting people, and I like I like meetingpeople, but it's I don't like forcing myself on to people and Handing Hem,Ademo and saying this is who I am and please give me a Gig it it's it'sexcruciating, but one of the things that when I first got out here that Iwould just force myself to do is to just show up, because you know aroundeight o'clock and I'm starting to think. Okay, these are the clubs. I need tohit ind the peel and I'd be tired and I just wouldn't want to go, but I wouldjust you know it just go. Even if you don't shake anybody's hand, just sit atthe bar because you never know whatwill happen and and at least you're going toget a good performance. So anyways, that's my advice that, because I knowit's grueling and it's awful and I hated it and now I know what it's likefrom the other side. When people come up to me and hand me Demos- and youknow- that's not super fun either, but at the same time I understand- and youknow be nice- is you know, meeting Nice people is always great and as a baseplayer, I'm meeting bases players. I need subs, you know so it's it'sgrueling and awful and it is for everybody, but it'll usually pay off.According to the Internet, Frank Zappa made sixty two albums before he diedand the Zappa family trust has released. Fifty five sencees death thanks largelyto Joe Travers, Danny Sarapin, is the original Drumar for Chicago desels.APPA was an MTV VJ for twelve weeks before getting fired for saying some.Not So nice things about MTV on the Howard, tern show razor blade. Editingis how editing was done before computers involves the actual cuttingand taping back together of real toreal tape. It's incredibly tedious and, likeJoe said, there's an art to it. Cutting together things in time is challengingand there's like no undue button. So it takes a massive amount of skilland experience to Eit with the precision that it would take to getFrank Zappas, music right. I can't even imagine stans for those of you thatdon't know are submixes of a larger mix that, when played together an equalvolume will exactly recreate the full mix you might get all the guitars on hestem or background vocals or strings et ce Nick rodes is fifty eight years oldand Frank Zappis. Wife's name is gale and he has four kids, Duezel Amett MoonUnit and diva, and maybe that will take care of some of the names that wetalked about on this episode that you may or may not know, but I hope you hada good time. Wow you've made it to the end, I'mhoping it's because you completely enjoyed yourself and are now filledwith knowledge and inspiration to move forward with your dreams. If that isthe case, and you would like to stay informed of new episodes, live eventsand General News, please go to dive Bar rockstarcom and sign up for themalinist. I you have any questions, comments, corrections or complaintsabout anything you hear on the show. Please email me at fan mail at dive BarRockstarcom, and you may even end up on the show we at the Divebar Rock Starpodcast with all of our hearts. Thank you for listening and remember. It'sall about dreams.

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