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The Dive Bar Rock Star Podcast
The Dive Bar Rock Star Podcast

Episode 4 · 1 year ago

Jennifer Jo Oberle- Trust Yourself (Vertical Horizon, Peter Asher, Five For Fighting)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Bass player/Singer/Orchestrator/Arranger/Songwriter Jennifer Jo Oberle talks about the many hats she wears in her career. She talks about her first show with the band “Vertical Horizon”. She discusses her experience in the house salsa band on the Mexican TV show, “Noches Con Platanito”. Jen reflects on her experiences as a side musician versus being in a band. She also talks about her songwriting process and her current original projects.

jenniferoberle.com

Records and Tapes Band

https://www.facebook.com/RecordsAndTapes

Noches Con Platanito

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XNKkbSfP1Xg&t=378s

Hard To Believe

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ly-eZC1YeXo

daysbetweenstations.com

The temple studio is available for allof your reporting mixing and mastering these, whether it's onlocation or viaInternet file, exchange located in the San Fernando Valley. The temple hasforty physical inputs for live ensembl tracking in a production team with overthirty years of experience to book time, Call Two one: Three, eight four zeroone: seven, seven zero or email pchadt at metcomwelcome to the Dibar rock star,podcast, show exploring the lives of professional musicians of all types,toring musicians, recording artists, songriders engineers, barbands weddingbands and anyone making e living e music in the stre. But he's dreamed ofbeing a professional or you already are one. This is the frodcast for you onyou, Ose Haircan, and I hope that you Nott only find some entertainment here,but also some helpful tips, trade secrets and ideas that will help youachieve your Jou. Thanks for listening to the PODCAST, Umreally excited about the guests. Today she is a base player, a incrediblesinger: Songwriter and orches traders slash ranger Um, an a musical director,so she wears many hats as many titles, as many of us do and where, becauseit's kind of what's required to make a living a lot of times in this crazymusic business. That obviously right now is significantly slowed. Um but we'rewe're getting through it she's.Also a fellow Berkeley alum. Although she graduated something I failed to doand and H. She's played with some of my favorite bands like fie for fightingand vertical horizon, and air supply and she's also played with Reeda WilsonDenny Lane Peter Asher, Terry Slvester, Chucknegron, Julianhuff and manymore.You can check it out on her website. She was also in the band calledLoschikas that was a houseband for a Mexican T. v show called nochess comPlatonito, which you have to check it out on you tube it's it's kind ofindescribable. It's basically a talk show hosted by a guy I in a wig and aclown face. So it's it's! It's unbelievable. I would highly suggestchecking that out on youtube and right now she's working on a record withbilly Shirwood from the band. Yes, so please enjoy my conversation withJennifer Joe Oberley. Let's, let's start with the the BillySherwood album. How did that all happen? And how did you guys meet? Oh this ishilarious, Um, well, Sean witesman H, who works forArteria invitamd to see yes at the Ford amphithatre a couple of years back andUm after the show we ended up. You know, meeting everyone in the band and I metBilli that night and yeah we KINDAF, we kindo hit it off and also he found outabout my Um, my tribute to Kape Bush yeah. So that was like the the mainconnection that was happening, and you know he heard my voice and he said well,you know listen. I have this project and I need a singerfor that I need aSingapore and Um Yeah. Then, like a couple of weeks later, I did one trackand the other guy that's in the band sepond from days between stations. He he liked the track. So I ended upbeing the lead singer for this project and it was so strange, but it was Asso.It was really cool because you know Billi writes a lot for Yus as well andhe has he has a long history with yes, Yei back from the eighties, you knowand and you ow he was Chris's pick to no h to o carry on the Leon. Theexactly exactly so you know, billie is a super talented guy and Um yeah. Hewrote a lot on the project and you know the vocals I had to sing were very muchlike you K, w John Anderston Ederson very very straight. You know hardly anyinflections and yeah. It was just a really really awesome experience. There was alot of you know harmonies a lot of layers. A lot of you know, offtimestuff, that you would hear and Wana Erd. So yeah, it's like it's. It's kind of my intro to Prague,...

...wow, that's very cool. I saw yesactually in Wocester, but when I was at Berkeley like nineteen ninety one hewasn't on it was the tour where they had every like. All the original guyslike to Trevor Raben, andnow and Yeah Anderson, Wafrm Bruford, and how andAlan White Yep yeah. Is it the Union tour? Yes, exactly? Yes, yeah. I sawthat in wicster mass the saw that in the medowlends in New Jersey, oh coolas a girl, poter, oh weand, now to be I mean that's such a great story rightthere. Anyway, you went to a concert and you got a GIG. You know with thethat's, that's pretty cool, that's like a dream, come true kind of thing yeahand it was really surreal. It was extremely surrial and- and we called itthe settlements, because we were all going through our divorces, anhilarious yeah and I just wanted to say too. You know it was my inshro toperforming in a Prague situation like you. I did a lot of the rush tributesthat you would see in. You know the jams, but but you know this is kind oflegit. You know you know it was super exciting you W my voicesounds very different than what I would normally do on other kinds of gigs, soyeah really Um. It was a special experience greatr. Where did you record, I recorded in Billy Studio, yeah Umhere NOA yeah here in l, a Ye cool, so you you just, did you playany base on it or just singing? I just sang I just sang, but you know theintention is for me to you, know, perform you know, playing and singingyou know D, which will be nt it'll, be Ba, very yeah. You D think that's kindof freeing, sometimes O be able to put the base down and just sing Oh definitel, especially when I wasdoing the Cape Bush tribute. You know it's, it's a very demanding position tobe a led singer, especially when youre singing cate stuff- and you know I'vedone a lot of other tributes at. I sing a lot of no B, no doubt stuff and yea.When I'm working with that band, I have someone else play base. While I singyou know it's great to do it all, but what I find is that just because you could doesn'tnecessarily mean you should definitely yeah and it's much more. Imake for me as a sing baselay. As well as like it's much more enjoyable to doone or the other, sometimes it depends on the style of music for sure, butlike cause in a way it's like the base is pulling you one way with your brainis to be very with the groove and on beat, and then your voice wants to kindof go other places, and it's a very it's a very M. I don't know what youuldcall that, but it takes your brain and twists it up a lot. You know, andsometimes I could be fun, and sometimes I us like. Oh, I could be such a bettersinger if I wasn't playing and I could be such a better player. If I wasn'tsinging you know, yeah, it definitely requires a lot of focus. I know that myapproach to playing base, too, is all about listening. So if I hear something,that's somewhat distracthing or something that I mean to you knownavigate as a baseplayer, it's going to take away from my vocal right right,exactly you know, yea and, and unfortunately, in La there are so manyI mean I am grateful to have so many different projects, and so many youknow hats to wear, but because of that you know the chances of me doing thesame Gig. You know a couple of times a wee riht, it's unlikely you know so so I end up working with a lot ofdifferent people. You know it's always a random kind of situation, so I'mgetting used to these new players, I'm freeling they play. I feel how theirtheir time is, and you know it's there's a lot of you know balancingthat needs to happen when I'm singing and playing you know right I' sure so who who are some of your favoritebasis like coming up, oh coming up whenever from when you started playingbase and paying attention to it, because you know I mean Bas is one ofthose things that kind of gets lost until you start to play it and you'relike oh now, you can hear it in all the records and like now you're focusing onit like who, who did you hear first and like really enjoy they're playing? OhWow? Well, you know. When I first started playing, I was I was dating aBlues Guitar Player, so I was all about you know: Edgar and Johnny Winter, Oh,very cool, yeah and I'm trying to remember the one of Johnny's bands were th e rhythmsection for double trouble. I think that the base player was Tommy. Shannonright was that his name. Yes, I think that's right Ye NNUP and corrected ifhis wrong, okay, thatwould be great and t en m Y. I was a huge Edgar winter fan,Um...

...and h. You know I I listen to hisrecords, the white trash records. I don't know if you're familiar, I'm notfamiliar but ILIKE aout. Now that you've brought it up, they're so killer,they are so killer, especially the live album, which is called roadwork andit's with Rick, Darringer and Dohnnies Johnni's got a spot in it and they do akillaversion of tobacco, road and yeah, and the baseplayer on that is guy namedRandy johobs and Um yeah, the guys I used to play with in Brooklyn. Theywere all blues, guys Tega, all about like h. They were all into old school,stuff Um and you kN self taught yea. So we wereall about you know jamming, and so so those were the first base players I gotinto, but then you know I I was always a big fan of music. I had a huge recordcollection. You know I. I lived around the corner from Zigzad records, one ofthe popular record stores in Broklyn back in the day and Um Yeah. I had ahuge collection, so I would I would play I would just play to records right.So you know I would play to the motown stuff and then later on, I found out Oit was James Jammerson and then I was huge areath e Franklin Fan. So I wouldl, you know, listen to a lot of Jerry Jamat, Shuck Raney. I think his name isDavid Hood or yeah. I think it's David Hood and Um and then, of course, the police. I wasa huge and IM still a huge thing: Fan Um and rush Yo, no getty Lee. You knowso M. my my favorites are all over the map. Um Uh yeah and I know I'm going to regretnot saying someone like, of course have apartne ride, O Jones. You knowcursquire John Antwistle. You know I was all about all of those flayers Um,especially like players that were in bands like, like you know the sessionguys I didn't know much about until I went to Berkley M. Like FreddyWashington, it was a huge reddy Washington fan market smiller. I Ididn't realize I knew Marcus Miller's work until I got to Berkeley, Um andand also Berkeley. I was in the Tower of power on Sambl, so I was a hugeRocko, Prestia fanand and I think a lot of my technique comes from that becauseyou know I had to shed a lot. You know I had to do a lot of like lefthandmuting and you W. I find myself doing like when I get asked to play morefunky stuff. I do a lot of like you know, Um, you know, muted stuff withmoney left hand, Soum, yes, Arocco, but Um. Also a a big heroon mine. One of my favorite base players stillis timlifay. I don't know yeah yeah and Um. I was I I I'm so grateful to be. Has Friends-and you know we we're good friends and UM and he's continuing to kick ass andtake names and e he's all about reinventing himself and he's Al allabout being his own artist, his own player? You know, I love that. I Love H,fearless musicians. You know that that you know it it's great to be able tomould yourself into another player. You know for a Gig, but there's somethingto be said about having your own voice on your instrument and that's somethinghe definitely has and that's something that most of t those baseplayers have.They have their own voice in their instruments yea from their instrument.It's it's an extension of themselves and Um. You know, that's you that'swhat turns me on you! No with with all those players yen. It's interesting that you likedmore bannd, guys and bands, because I think in a band you have more freedomto have your own voice versus being a sideman where you're sort of emulatinga record that might have been made or or even if you made the record youremyemulating that or 're sorto about the mercy of somebody else's art. You knowwereands, it's like what do you have to say: that's what makes a band aband youknow: Yeah Prety Cool Yeah. Definitely I miss that. I feel like in the futureI'm going to do a lot more original stuff. For that reason, Yo, I think,being you know, being a full time, freelance base player again, you knowI'm playing a whole bunch of different styles with random people. I just neverknow where the next Gig is going to come from as much as as it's a gift andI'm grateful for the experience you know. I I do need to remind myself thatyou know there is a part of me that wanted to have the artistry an myplaying. You know I wanted that experience Um, so you W, I I hope to domore of that in the future. Well, you've been in a couple of my favoritebands. Actually, so I guess we should...

...just talk about it. We can start withfive for fighting yeah, one of my favorite he's not reotrally a band,though really it's it's ondrastic yeah, it's John, but h.How was that experience? Well, that was definitely a pivotal momoment for me, because I I didn't even expect to get thataudition. I got that through a friend of mine,Paul ill he's a baseplayer he he did a lot of work with Linda Perry and awhole bunch of other bands he met. He met me at the Kibbis Room, jam and Um. You know he sat me down and he's likeHey Jim. What do you want to do w t y? What do you want to do? And you know atthat time I was still married, so I said you know I want to see the worldbefore I have my kids and and then he was like. Well, you know you shoulddefinitely do that and then this other guy. On the other side, he was justlike Na. No have your kids Y, it's not worth it iwas like how di, dare you say that toher andlike they had it out. Like you know,one guy was like former, you know executive, and then you know Polish,just like you know letting him have it and then later he he a. He h left a message andhe told me that fibere fightings looking for a baseplayer and we allthink that it has your name written all over itand Um. I got the audition and I I I don't remember a time where Iprepared more for an audition like I transcribe it. The music definitelyspoke to me. You Know Johns music and his voice and and the messages in hismusic definitely Um. You know connected with me and, and and you know,the baselines were just gorgeous so y. When I got that audition it was.It was a huge shift in in my career out here for sure, because I think a lot ofa lot of people were auditioning and UH. You know Um it kind of put my my name in the map.You know out here. No but yeah. He John is amazing. He's just a brilliant man mh. He does a lot for different charities and his family is just so o they're, just so warm and kind and Um. It was a great experience. Travelingwith them and doing all these shows and playing with Randy is, is awesome:Ranoh, yeah, yeah and H, Charlie Maxin and yea stra drummers monster drummers. Youknow it's just a great experience and Uh Yeah Yeah. Well, the other man thatI think I've cold yo before but like vertical horizon is one of my whenthere that first record that everything he was probably one of my top fivepaper records o all the time, and you were in that band for a whileas well. Yes, yes, several years M and I didn't even audition for that thatgig um it was it just kind of Um. I I you know my my x was in that bandand yet I got to know Matt, and I remember one day we were. We werehanging out Um. Where was it norms, music, right, its Tarzit Rie? Ah, and we werejust jamming- and you know Matt and I have a lot of similar. We have similar taste in music like heloves CAPBO. She loves rush. She loves Maden Yoknowso. We were always likekind of back and forth with all these songs that we loved and stuff and Yo Yoknow I I went to a y a we were just like testing out guitars and bases, andI was just kind of jamming with him and then Um a couple of months later. Sothis is a great story, because it it really didn't have much to do with my xit it had something to do with a drummer named Ryan Brown, Oh and yeah,so from Denver. Actually is he from there didn't know that you mean theDwesel Aber? Yes, yea yeah Yeari yeah he's orinally from Denver where I'mfrom. I know that o h he's an amazing germer and a great friend and he's alsoa huge rush fan right, so he went to the rush. Show and Matt was sitting right next to 'em and they juststarted. Talking and Ryan mentioned that I just got the five for fightingGig and then you know D, then shortly afterthat, like you know, Mat's girlfriend is like you got the G. It's amazing, that'samazing, you know, so I I think that's what made him see me as a professionalright instead of the wife Nan, and then...

...you know he. He ended up asking me todo a Gig in Denver Colorado and gave me like. Oh God, I think it was liketwenty songs or something an yeah, and it was you know. Luckily I knew all the songs in my head.You know and thet was the cramming was just a lot of fun. You know, and- and Ihad you know, there was no audition- there was no rehearsal. You know we'dgo to sound check and thenit's all these TEC issues like we can't even getsound on stage. You know we're using in years. You know how it is within your there's, always these problems and thenUm and I remember I had like a little Chee Sheet. You know on the side whereI was like. Okay, you know just in case you know. I need something and I leftit in in the Um, in the trailer and- and you know Istarted panicking on once I got Y. Actually, the first song I played withMatt was on the Gig like not at the the soundcheck. It was right when we started to play wow, and it was amazing becauseyou know at that point I I don't know if you've ever had a situation likethat, but yeah it it's like you're. Definitely in the hot seat. You knowyou have to deliver, there's a lot of o. You don't want to fuck it up. You knowyou don't want to screw up, and you know you want to make a goodimpression and yo o there. I am just kind of panicking that I don't havethis chee cheat and then it just kind of occurred to me. Well, you know you're already you're already on stageyou might as well just have fun with it and don't stress and- and I did- and itwas just it was awesome. It was just such a joyous show and Um Mat is anincredible guy, another great guy and Um y. no, I got to traveled to toGuantonmo Bay with him and wow the troops and Asyeah y. We did a symphonyshow in Waiki key yeah, a lot of really great experienceswith that too he's still a dear friend and yeah. That's that's! I havenightmares like that on on the reg, even during this, even during this Coit,when I'm not eve working, I've been having these stress treams like I getto the stage, and I forgot to learn all the songs you know o like could be anykind of Gig but whato you kno. I think we both had that situation with airsuppli didn'Wa Right, Yeah Yeah, when I, when I got you know, got called Stuffor them, 'cause that was kind of a weird situation actually B'cause. I wasstoming for Derek and then the dight gay came up that I a also I had to sortof jump off and you got the call to sup for me something for Terik but Um. So I'm sure the pressure wasworse on you 'cause. I had a lot more time to learn the SOCC o you did yeah'cause. I mean I probably knew for a good six weeks before the GIG and I Ifeel like you got the call like a week and a half or something I d n't, Idon't know th whos ituation. It was awful. I felt really bad about it, butUm yeah it was. It was the week of I think or like a week ago, a wee crier,yeah and actually vertical was the same way. It was Oh, it was a weak prior andthat's just how it happens. You know a lot of times you gotta do what you'gotta do yeah for sure, but there's Reson time that I just I just subbedwith airsupply again in January, and I had like the charts on my EEPAD, but Ihad once again like memorized everything and I was just Gon Na- notuse them and go out, and you know challenge myself and impress myself,and I had him in my suitcase, but I was like for the sound check we just playedand we did a couple of sins and it was all good and then Aaron mclan, theMusicl diector. He Goes, oh you're not going to use any charts, and I was like I just panicked. All of a sudden like Iknow I know all this material. You know I' once again spent like two weeks,just learning it and memorizing it, but just the idea that was like it justthat challenge in my head, like you know, at I'm, going to get my chartsanyways just in case like you totally syked me out, but andthat's a weird, it's it's a hard show. It's not. They don't play their musiclike the records. You know there there's a lot of stuff to know in that.AIRSUPPLAE show there's some details in those arrangements for sure, and thenthey have. Oh, they have us going out in the front of the stage too exactly it's our moment right Ye coreography,exactly yeah. We go to stage right and then center stage and yeah. Here I oi'mglad I learned this one like dragging my charts behind me. It'snot...

Glan yeah t was a fun gig though yeah.I love that Gig, it's a lot of fun. Oh you know I wast going to mention toothat Sean Hurley was the original vertical horizons, baseplayer right,Andother, Berkeley, Guy Yeah, and he just last. I heard he was playing withJohn Marroryes. Yes, he is what's really funny. Is that Um? I ended up ona GIG with Sean. What liquid Mac one of the symphony shows the fleawin Mat one.He Played Bass Ogreat as Im Andyeah, I got Tho Sang Sing, all the stevie stuff,oh punny yeah. I was going to bring that up earlier, actually 'cause. Asfar as US hanging out and talking, it's like we're base players to there'snever two base players on a GIG like baseballers. Don't we don't hang thatmuch because we're never on the GIG together, you know whehere you go thatsometimes it happens. Yeah and actually there's been a couple of other times.That's happened too, where Yo W. I do a lot of lead. Singing N, like some MDwork, Ruyeah, it's it's always great to base players are my favorite musicians.I mean they're just so fun and they just got the best personalities, and Idon't know I I think we're lucky to be baseplayers. I think so. Like I said Iwas bitter about it earlier and now I I'm coming around to it again. Ithink I and another Gig that we did that. Ionly did it once, but I think you've done it a bunch of the Peter Asher Umsh extravaganza. I don't even know what to call it. It's like a it's. It wasthe coolest craziest show I'd ever seen, but it was another situation. Just likeyou described vertical rise and wer. I met him about three songs into the show.Righlike we start playing, he comes on. Does thogh and there's a multimediathing where the video is playing and he came over to me an s like hey man,how's it going I'm Peter likehows, I gon Americ and then the show ended. Heleft the stage and I never even never even got to talk to him or anythingreally so but um. But it's kind of amazing. Like he's, I I think of Hem as like the forestgump of rock and roll. He was just everywhere in Thi, like the history ofof Pop music in a weird way, and he nead talks about it for three hours andthat's a show. You know and hen. We you play a couple of songs in there he'squite the Renaissance Man of Rock, and I had a similar experience where Imet him on stage at the cunting room when hedid his show, and it was the same thing and- and I don't know about you, but Iwas mesmerized by all of the images and the videos you know just hearing. You Know PaulMcCartney saying world without love which Jus himn his acoustic and theNapkin with his writing on it. It was just there were so many surreal momentsabout his show that I was. I was kind of panicking because I wanted to stayfocused on my next q right. I was like turning around like wow. This is cool.I don't know this. I didn't know that W ch part of so many people's careersand Um and what's amazing, is that every show he adds something different,there's always something new. You know. Even you know now he's like in hisupper seventies and he's got this. You know serious sexam show radio show for about the Beatles ohes you and it' ady. Just he just published a book, theBeatles, a s zed- and you know he just he just received Um. He was a he's, a commander of theBritish H, O whatever bre yeah, pretish yeah he's just everywhere, and you knowHe. He started with Peter and Gordon in in the early sixties, and an his actwas one of the first to play. The Sullivan show wow incredible and thenhe went to to be the CEO of Abel records, discover James Taylor and andbecome you know, Linda rodstadz manager, producer and skyrocket, her career, andhe did that with so many other artists, and it's just really surreal. You know I look at him as a guy. That justproves that you can constantly reinvent yourself in this business. You know youdon't always have to just play one instrument, you don't always have to bean artist. You could go on the other side, you could produce, you couldmanage Um and you could be a publisher, you, youcould publish a book and you could have a podcast. You know right, it's it's!It's such a...

Y. It's really amazing. To have thistime where we could really sit and figure out what our next move is goingto be n lot of people are, are scrambling. Now people don't know what,when their next GIG is going to be, and you know it's a you see someone like Peter, he figuredout a way. You know he's got he's got his show. You have this podcast. Youknow lot of people are doing creative things now. It's yeah really and Iwouldn't really have the time or the the energy of the opportunity to dothis without this big pause. So so you grew up in Brooklyn that tat right, MHMSheep said Ban how D T? How do you think that influenced your yourmusicality growing up in like the center of the universe? You Know NewYork City is such a cool. That's where all the cool stuff comes from yeah.Well, Brooklyn, where I grew up. It was a little bit further away fromManhattan, Youn New York City, and they call it Um and I was a self taught baseplayer. I I ended up. You know like like theysay you know: Teacha teach someone to to play a se, an you play a see and thenext week teach someone a G. Then, all of a sudden you have a Gig, you knowIlie of that Um and h yeah. I just ended up, you know just using my ears and and things just started picking up. Youknow it was just like one of these things that it was like. Oh Cool II'lldo this, it was a lot of fun and- and it just t it just there- was thisinstant magnetism between me an and the base like I, I layed a lot of otherinstruments prior to that, but Um something about the base. Just you knowI was just like this gravitational pole. You know wow, very cool, yeah and sureenough. I was you o what what you used to be a hobby became. You know myprofession so wow, so you never sort of had this epiphany of I'm going to be aprofessional musician. It just sort of I it actually did happen. When I I wasburning the candle at both ends. I had a day job. I was working in the cityand M. I was up for a promotion and you know I I was definitely qualified. Youknow I that way, and because I was always working at night, I was kind ofover you know. Compensating I was, was you know, working even harder, just toprove that I can do it all. You know trying to be the superwoman and Y. Theytold me that in order to get this promotion I would have to quit music.You know Quito, you know because it would be more demanding and I lied, andI said you know I would do it for this job and and sure enough. You know they.They gave it to someone else, and I was like okay. Well, that's my cue. I notappear and then sure enough Um. You know it was Independence Day weekend. Iremember because I was like I'm free a'm free at last. You know and and sureenough that was kind of. Like my calling like all of a sudden, I waslike okay, I'm I'm applying for Berkley, I'M gonna. You know cash in my four oone K, I'm gonna, you know make this happen and uh yeah itshat whole yeah. Iwas pretty crazy. I Sene those big decisions are made for you in a way youknowwellyeah in. In that circumstance it definitely worked in my favor forsure, and you were always playing music where wou wer a musical kid. And yes, yes, my my mom H Tashe. She just has thisnatural ability and my grandfather he died before I was around, but he hadhis own orchestra and there was always instruments in the house. So you know I.I would end up just picking up different instruments and figuring itout and Um. I I went from violind to piano to drumsand clarinet and base count and came around a littlelater. That's cool yeah yeah. I kindof findthat like most base players, it wasn't necessarily the first choice like a lotof times, you're just like well, there's. No one else: US WHO's going toplay the base o. You gotta, do it or you know like, but it sounds like it.KINDOF started like that, but then you took a liking to it. Well, yeah! I I always love Grove. Youknow I osome of my first gigs I was a drummer.I was a drummer in like a Glam punk hand and uh, and it was a lot of fun, but it was alot of lugging. You know like a lot of e to to carry, and you know I'd get allsweaty at the end of the night and it was like h. You know something they're pritting and h yeah,I think Um...

God. I think it was Um. I was dating some guy and he was a bassplayer and he you know, I picked up the base and I was just like I just figuredit out. It was just one of those things that was just so intuitive riing outright, that's interesting, yeah! Well, knowledge of the drums is pretty vitalfor a base player. So it's I'm kindof the same way I started on drums andwent, went to base Um and I think that's helped me as a baseplayerimmensely 'cause. Obviously, that's our job is just to be with the drums. Youknow sure yeah, I always say I'm just afrustrated drummer, I'm kind of a reluctant baseplayer really 'cause, I'm.I call it my day job really, but I always wanted to be t the guy with theguitar the front of the bands singing. You know not t like the DU in the backjust laying down the low notes, but but you're also a singer to yes. Yes,exactly so, and I worked it out eventually B ut, but I don't know there was somethingmore rock and rolld about playing guitar njust too much work for me. But what's really funny is that y aduring this quarantine? That's what I've been doing. I've been playing moreguitar than anything else O I have the time righ yeah, that's cool, yeah andalso you know we have to figure out a way to to perform, and I'm not one ofthose people that that just feel s comfortable. Like Oh look at me playinga group like look at me playing this. You Know Im right. You know, especiallysince I I've done a lot of cover gigs. You know so. Um I've been using thisopportunity to kind of brush up on my keyboard skills and my guitar skills,and I did a couple of quarantine shows, and you know it's humbling, it's humbly. We try todo it all Y. No, you see a lot of our our friends ar ar you knowthey'ethey're taking some chances. You know and it's working, it's working,yeah yeah, it's pretty cool. I was just like screwling through face Bot beforewe started and it's Friday night, and so many people do their shows onfrinday night. So now it's like instead of bar hopping you're, just facebookcopying from from one performance to the next know it's kind of cool. I meanI don't if, if that's something positive that can come out of all ofthis, then that's great yeah for sure, and you know it's it's a way tocontinue connecting with people and again it's it's a way to to starttapping into other skills that w you might not have had the time to. Youknow work on in past. You know right like being a podcast host yeah. This is Wesee, we'll see. I don't know, I'm agood editor. How about that? How good? And then you mentioned you went toBerkeley like like as like. I did O yeah h. When did you go? I was therelike ninety one to ninety three awesome and did you like it there I loved it Umand it w. It was also another humbling experience. I I went a little laterbecause you know I told you I had a day job prior to it and Um and I went and- and I made sure I I took some lessons before I went. I met with this Guy Patrick fier Um inin New York, like in the upper west side, and I I took, I think, like threeor four lessons with him an yea just to get. You know an idea of what to expecttand Um, I went n and it was so much fun. It was so much work so humblingand it was just a really beautiful experience being just totally immersedin in music and all styles and just learning a whole bunch of differentskills. Again you know, site reading and all that and Um. You know Latin andUm what else and you know walking base lines you don t likeunderstanding jazz in a deeper winday. You Yeah Yeah, it's a great greatschool in Boston's such a great town too. That's of good music there, whoare your teachers M, ow man. It's been so long now Danny he played in the Clipso BandCLIPO Hurricane. He was my favorite guy, the dig DianyMorris Y, ah Anmi, yes, Danny Mo yeah EXAC, exactly yeah. He was great too.The first day I walked in. He pulled out a book of of a bunch of JamesJameson transcribed. You know baselines and I was like okay. This is GOINGTAwork. This is going to be great. This is exactly what I want to be learning.You know what I mean Ye H. I lover that book, Yeah Yeah so great before the hadte older dude, I'm not going to remember H, but he wasmore of a classical upbright guy. James...

REPUCI is ohrkuci yeah eah yeah yeah.He was my first teacher and it was a little more serious and I don't know I didn't feel like. I wasgetting as much out of that as as learning appliable stuff like JamesJamerson, you know we, you were a student right. Did you take lessons Um,I mean those were my lesson: seecers yeah, but prior to that, like did youoe base before you went to Berkeley not really like. I I I played base inin Jazzband at my high school, and I was always the guy that no one elsewould do it, so I always ended up playing base like like. I was kindotalking about so Um. I didn't really enjoy practicing, so I learned to read'cause then I could just show up and play you know, because I wantd I wasplaying keyboards where I was playing guitar or whatwhatever else. I wantedto do Um. So by the time I got going to Berkeley, it was like well, the one tha.The instrument I can read the best on is the base. So if I'm going to have asgood a shot as I can, I I might as well stick to that. You know so it wasn'teven until probably two years after Berkeley, I finally committed to beingokay, I'm a base player, I'm just going to start calling myself that I'm go,buy a good base. You know, but I sort of I don't know, backed into itreluctantly. I guess Oh well Yeah Fo. For me, I I just lovethe connectivity of it Um y at first, I didn't want to be in the spotlight. Ikindo liked being in the back hidden with the drummer and just kind offeeling, the time and and h connecting with the other people on stage Um. You know I I've always been a bit M ofa nervous communicator like I've. Just always been a little bit self conscious,so Itas kind of my way of communicating Um being on stage an and connectingmusically with these people, yeah and and the base definitely has like a jobto do. I think that's what makes it a little less fun it's something I enjoynow I meandoing it it vor thirty years now, so you know what a you youdefinitely connected the things and enjoy the job of the base. But when Iwas a kid and I had so much, I thought I had I wanted to say having to do you know what I mean likethe base has a job. I have to play the downbeat. I have to play the baseline,whereas a GCITAR player thinking, I'm Goingto do this on this court now orI'm gonna. You know what I mean: There's more creative spaces in theband. So for me I was just like. Ah I have to do this. You know what I meannow. I appreciate it. Yeah there's, definitely a nurturing quality in beinga baseplayer that you don't tend to have as like a a guitar soloist. You know, I think youknow, maybe maybe a rhythm guitar player would have a little bit more ofa nurturing quality but yeah it's a whole personality thing mm yeah. Ithink so you got to be a leader of sorts and hold it down. You hold it down whyeveryone else gets to play. You know, I don't know I sound bitter about it. I have a happylife. IREAL, no you're, awesome e I'd like to take a second to thank youfor listening to the diepar rocks our podcast as a newpodcast. Getting theword out is a vital part of what it takes to keep a show on the road or off the road, as their current casemay be. If you would like to support the podcast, all you got to do issubscribe wherever you listen, and if you have an extra minute or two, pleaseleave a review. You can also share and follow the potgast on your social media,haps, okay enough begging, I hope you'rehaving fun and once again thank you for listening. So how long after Berkeley did you endup here? MM? Okay? So, let's see, I think I think it was six years later, five orsix years later after I graduated, I was one of those people who graduatedbecause Um yeah- I I I didn't. I took my Gd- Ididn't you know finish. I didn't complete high school, like I got my youknow diploma, and you know it was kind of like a sore subject. For me, it waskind of like unfinishmen business, where you know I wanted to make sure Ifinished. Ri Did my time, you know and UH so yeah. When I got my my degree, Ihave to say I I was very exhausted and I was alittle bit I have to admit. I was a bit discouraged because there was so muchinformation thrown at me and so much I wanted to absorb that. I couldn't atthe time Um and I my my life- was kind of going into adifferent place. Personally, so I was...

...just kind of figuring: okay, I'll getanother day job and do my weekend warriors stuff and and and that workedfor several years until you know, like you say, the universe does for you.What y Yo don't want to do for yourself and and Um. You know I just felt verydrawn to make a move. You know I was very drawn to go to l a UM. I Hadt,some friends out there out here, Um and and yeah. I made that consciousdecision, that's cool and you you like it. I I love it Um, you know. Basically, you know I hate toskate around it, because it's such a big part of my life, but you know I wasmarried and I was married to another musician and you know we had this thisduo that we would we would play out in Boston all over. You know like UmQuincy Market N, inofaniel, all nd Um. We played this place, the barking craband right on the water and Um. It wasreally great. We had a residency every weekend, you know Friday through Sundayand then we had our day jobs and it was very comfortable, but it got to thepoint where I needed something different and I started writing my ownmusic. We we built a studio and then I had I had a full length album that I wantedto finish, and you know like, I think a lot of people do withtheir first recording project. They overproduce themselves- and you know bythat time I just kind of exhausted that idea and decided to do something else.Um and then you know h my my husband atthe time he had the the friends out in l, a that you know he was going tovisit and actually I did too. I did too. I never got about this because westayed at my friend's house Um and that first day we were there Um. One of them gave me a Scrip Thoscreenplay and she had us read it and then we went to gladstones and Malt andwe read this script and then, like I, I just started hearing things. I juststarted hearing, you know music and Qes and everything, and when we went back Iwas just kind o telling her. Well, you ow, we could do this, we could do thatn and then all of a sudden, I had a scoring gig. So then I was just likeokay. This is where I need to be. The Universe is calling you know. So I Went we bewwe went back to Boston and I I rode about two hours worth of scoringmaterial and you O. eventually we went back to l ayou know. I was thinking that we were going to continue with this project and sure enough. They ended up havingyou know. The budget was too high to do thatmovie, but they did a smaller budget film, which I wrote music for so it waspretty exciting to to kind of jump into that world so quickly. You know it wasKindo like you know that Aha moment, O divine intervention hit. You know thefirst day all of a suddeand. I got work or like the idea of work. Let's justput it away. You know you learn really quickly out here that people say stuffand then you just don't know until it actually happens right right, yeah,yeah, that's that's! Probably one of the biggest differences from NewYork to L A LA's, a lot of talking, not so direct. You know, fiance stuff,they'n't necessarily lie about stuff. It's just a way laid back like yeah man,things are going to happen. Y have coffee sometime, let's go crike yeah right. I mean we're,never going to go for Yeer ne like Acor, but if I need Ya, I'm going to call youand Thean. While the phone rings and you're like Oh wow, I's just scored big,you know so, were you a film squaring major atBerkeley? No, it was just another thing that just kind of fell on my lap. Itwas just Kindo, it just happened so suddenly and Um it was. It was reallyfun. You know I'd like to do more of that in the future. Yeah. Well, you've done all these bigorchestration gigs, like Yechistra, symphony tributes and stuff. How didyou get into all that? I mean you obviously have those skills is thatstuff that you learned at Berkelear? No, it's another thing that just kindoffell on my lap Um, I was working on a TV show, a Mexican T v show for severalyears and it was one of those know moments. I have a lot of these momentswhere I'm just done with something it's like. I took it as far as I caltake it so um I had to kind of you know,...

...leave that job and decompress, and Itook a month off and I spent that month. Um on my my birthday, GIG and or mybirthday, I wanted to do a show, a tribute to Keebush and susy an ebanchis, a yeah. I rememer so through that I ended up learning howto how to score through finale, because there was a lot of string parts and-and I wanted to make sure everyone got their charts and stuff. So they didn'thave to do all that work. You know so that was my first intro to scoring andarranging in Orkstrai an orchestration and from there I ended up working in some ORC or castal tributeswith a friend of mine, Dan Callisher. I I think you know Dan Right. I don'tknow a and and his wife Alicia and you know h. We ended up talking and he's like, Ohyeah Y, a we're doing this other tributes to fleewid Mac and Yo ow. Iknow you're a big fan. You know, would you like to come on board and then youknow I started talking with the the guy that was managing this and and kind of producingthis, and and eventually he asked me if, if I would want to score it, it wasjust so random. It was really random and prior to that, I only did one otherorchestration and it was for the Um wild honey autism thing tank benefitand it was the music of the beach boys. So I did all the horn arrangements forthat or where I should say just you know, transcribed thehorn arrangementsfor them, so so it was. It was a huge shift in my career borsure, because youknow there. I was sitting at home every day, just kind of transcribing andlistening and absorbing all these details, and it was, it was amazing Um. You know I was. I was writing for afifty piece orchestra, and you know it was pretty crazy to just jump into.That's. That's pretty awesome yeah. You know it it's kind of surreal. When I thinkabout it, you know how that t all kind of came together, because from that Iended up, you know, working with Nelli on thislike hip, hop symphony, show and then a whole bunch of others like I, I workwith Whit, cleff Jahn, and that was that was the huges that was like so much work, bbecause Clef, you knowhe he writes like a Dj, you know and Um. We did a several working sessionsthrough face time and there were like five to six hours, long and Um Y.originally, I was like I think I was commissioned to do eighteen songs, butwhat I didn't know was in those eighteen songs. There was going to bemashups and MED leae. You know Iasso like there were a couple likereal huge experiences like I had to do like, for you know for Song, milt,Medley and Um, and it it got crazy because Yo no, alot of his stuff has has a you know, really tricky rhythms and andarrangements and stuff and it it was really exciting. Though he he'ssuch a fun guy and he's so charismatic and inspiring, you know well, yourbirthday gae was awesome. I haven't seen these others, but it was anything like that and that waskind of amazing too, because Cape Bush is such a intipate music and it was atMally Malone's at this bar and tons of people there, but there were momentswhen you could hear a pin drop. You know like it was going over so well. Imean it was full of a lot of musicians too. So we tend to know how to listenbetter than normal, drunk people- I guess but Um. It was really amazing. Ithought it was so cool. Thank you. It was definitely a labor of love and itwas just one of those you know again like it was. You know the planetsaligned and it just kind of moved my career in a different place. I'm sureyou could relate to that right. Yeah. I I've gone from smooth jazz to country.I don't know how that happened. Rightweeo've got, though you know when there's not a quarantine that Iwork there. Yeah yis Wi likes to work for sure, so I have no complaints. It'sa great gig and I do a lot of singing which is kind of more what I dreamed ofdoing in the first place. So it's kind o Mentwite, just singing harmonies allnight. So it's it's a really fun Gig, but againsometimes I wake up and I'm like how did I get here? This is amazing.

It definitely you know it. It was meantto be. You know, wit's really. I love this. Thank you for inviting me to dothis because I remember you know you and I get called for a lotof the same gigs in town right. I remember it took years before Iactually met you and I I think I've called you a couple of times to subor.You know Erya Maneyeah. We both get called for being those singing baseplayers, an exactly there's, not a lot of 'em in town. Believe it or not. Youknow. So it's a it's a good good couple ofskills to have definitely definitely yea a lot of heavy lifting yeah yeahand we don't get paid twice as much. That's kind of the the Crock of it all. Also about keeping it fresh too. For me,like I, I I kinda like to keep it fun and keep it challenging yeah. Well,obviously, you're willing to just jump in andwrite for an orchestra. THAT'S PRETTY AWESOME! I would I'm just sointimidated by that and I love string parts and I do a lot of strings in mystudio with when I'm producing tracks, but I've never quite had the you knowthe the balls yet too, like hire an orchestra and actually do it. You know I don't know why it's so intimidatingto me, but I I commend you for jumping in. I don't know it's pretty amazing. II appreciate that I, it was definitely surreal yeah. So you mentioned also thethe show that you were on Mese. I get it right, no JESCON, Platanitoflatanito. Yes, he I watchd, I spent a good hour or so watching it online. Oh crazy and I don't speak Spanish, so a lot ofit is just over my head, but you O, but also they do all these weird skits andit's basically hosted by a guy in a clowns, suit, MHM and UH. So a lot ofit is sort of visual humor that you don't. Do you speak Spanish? No! No! SoI don't know was it a funshow to make it looks, it was. I was completeinsanity and, what's really hilarious, is that Um? I got that Gig through asalsa band that I still play with, but originally the name was lasalsa DivasNa now it's lachicas. So I was all about playing Salza and you know, withwith these SALCI gates. We also play a lot of Combias, which is Asicin a styleand Um. We we get called to do this audition. No one told us what it is hwe knew t was a t v show and we auditioned with some salsa like we knowsome Sali Celia, Cruiz and Um, and then we're like okay. What else do you knowlike? Okay? We played Acombia I's like hey. Do you know any pop tunes and- andI was the only of American- you know pop girl, so so Um, you know I. I endedup kind of helping the band kind of figure out something you know like abiance to and UH crazy in love. That's what we did and h. We ended up gettingthe GIG and then crazy in love ended up being the theme song. Oh that's crazershow yeah. It was pretty bizarre, but the more what's more bizarre than that is that the musical director could notspeak English. When I first got the GIG when he was telling us he was giving usQus, he was saying everything in Spanish and instead of Um telling us to play a se or a B or an a,he would say it in sulpage, oh Interestin, yeah and- and he would sayit in Mexican, Salfach, right or or Spanishselvage right whenever he would say. Oh, he would saylie. I would play a you know, soul. I would play G, but then he would say seeand then I would play see right. I what he meant B right. We are interesting, okay, so Yo, Ilearned it as Ben Ei Bun. He he calls me sic interesting, Amess, everything as justsoembarrassing, I mean look extremely humbling, andeverything was sightreading and this guy, he you ow. We did a lot of Banda music, which is thereally crazy. You know almost feels losided music with with a whole bunchof of horns and and a Um a trumbone and an Atuba, and- and hegave me all these Tuba parts and everything was written like an octave,at least in an octave above where I...

...should be playing it. So t sight readthat you know on command. It was verystressful. Eventually, over the years we we westarted getting a little bit. We we started be being able to communicatebetter. You know he started learning English. I started learning moreSpanish. He kind of modified those parts, butyeah. It was definitely such a learning. Experience to sayst Um is crazy. It wascrazy and then you'd have, like you know, ties being thrown in everydirection: basketball, random, random things yeah I I was just. I couldn'ttake my eyes off it. It was ie, give me another episode of this. IsI don't even know what I'm looking at this is is insanity, but but it wasawesome. Well, can you imagine how it felt to like stand there and listen toall these interviews and know r they're saying what's really funny that theirmannerisms are so big like they were just so expressive that you could getan idea right had an idea of what they were saying so by the end of it by thesixth year. I I definitely understood a lot more than I could speak right right,that's cool yeah! I did SPI spend twelve years on the road withKacomatsui. You know being surrounded by Japanese all the time, so I'm kindof familiar but UM. At least she spoke enough English. Youknow that we could communicate, but there was a lot of, especially in Japan.One time we went on this Japan tour and she decided that she wanted to givethis, like. Maybe the fourth song in she gave about a three minute speech,all in Japanese and three minutes when you're standing on stage in front ofyou know. Fifty hundred people as a long time, it feels really long whenyou don't understand what they're saying at all you know or what she'ssaying? U, so I guess I could relate a little bit, but but what a cool show so did you preferthat necessarily to like being on the road, or did you like the T v work ore?You Still D, it's not on anymore right, Um, it just finished Um. The lastseason was last fall, but I think that the show is still on Um, Australia, Australia, T V, Oi. Thinkit's still on at nine o'clock. Every night they just go a lot of reruns but yeah. I prefer C touring. I preferPop Music Um. I learned a lot from that experience. It's definitely a gift tobe able to. You know, jump in and play a lot of different styles on command,but you know Um. I I felt like no, where I personally feel morecomfortable is through you know, pop music and and stuff. I grew uplistening to you know more organic music Um. You know not to say that if,if another TV gay came around, I I would I would jump for theoperrortunity I because Y, especially if it's American pop, because I'mdefinitely a lot more versed Tan that, but I you know it's always been a dreamof mind to to travel the world and and uh you know be in a band. You know I I've alwayswanted that. You Know Camaraderie and that connection with aband and uh it's been great, though I mean I've had a little bit of thatexperience as well, and I'm grateful. So, do you write your ownmusic like? Are you you consider yourself a songrider as well? Well,yeah I've done I've I've written. I I had a full length record that I wasgoing to Um release in. I guess it was two thousand four Um and that was back in Boston Um, butonce I moved out to l a you know, my my career kind of youknow shifted to more the side, man, a kind of position thm and I did start writing with Ferdent,Fernando Predomo of Echoin the Canyon. I guess people wouldknow it osely from from that, but he's an amazing multiged Amoun, a multiinstrumentalist and producer and yeah. We had a couple of singlesout a couple of years ago under the name, records and tapes and yeah, so II'm pretty sure we're going to start. You know riding again in the future andI'm looking forward to that. That's cool yeah I checked out ver. Was it hard to Hart to believehard to believe? Yes, Yesar Y, very cool? Thank you like supermalatic, andyou guys voices really cool together, Thankyeh it as a lot of fun. You knowand what's that whole project came about through H, our mutual love,forcape bushed as well, which was...

...hilarious. When I ment him, we bothwere wearing Kebush tshirts. What are the Odiwouland? It was at the Kimit'sroom again he was like I gotta work with you. Igot to work with you, so we ended up writing this song and, like you know,like forty minutes or something and and Fernando just his style, like we writethe song and he's posting on facebook like like two seconds later, like Wyon, youwouldn't believe it. You know, and then three weeks later, three weeks later,you know U h. We have our first GIG and I'm likeFernanda. How are we going to do this? We only have one song, but by the endof it we ended up having a full set right. Wow, you just fill it in withCape Bush. Songs yeahactually did a cover of feelet, but most of it wasdefinitely original. Sta Wow, you just start writing and yeah. It was verystressful, though I got to say but m. It was a great exercise. You know right,it's getting it done and Um Yeah. I I look forward to do more doingmore of that in the future. For sure IANSTILL, you seem toend when you'rewriting are you writing on base or your guitar or keyboards or Um. You know it comes from manydifferent sources with Fernando, I think he was. He was playing guitarand I just kind of you know started thinking about melodies in eal and thenUm, and then I think I I went to the piano.You know I M, I'm very comfortable with you know just progressions on pianomore so than the guitar, but you know I do play a little bit of guitar as wellUm, and then you know at this point. I haven't really started a song with abaseline, but you know that is something that I'd like to do in thefuture. For sure right, you kno it's just it's weird because yit it seems that Yo I go to to. I go to different thingsfor different reasons. Like I love base because of the connectivity, theininstant connectivity, I have with other players in the bands, and youknow I I lookd to the keyboard or the guitar to to create more MHM. You knowto Um Eah. I don't know if it makes sense, I don'tknow Wellyou know I picked up the guitargetlike I used to play guitar when I was a kid and then I had spent ten yearsplaying the base and then I I I it's kind of a long story, but I I wasplaying with Le Rittin hour and we opened up for Kenny loggens and I wasjust like I've been playing instrumental musicfor years. I'm a singer, you know, and it just inspired me to go, buy a guitarand just start riding again, but as soon as you play an echord, it'sa different feeling than what you can do on base. You know the basis of onenote at a time: it's it's a you, don't have the depth of harmony, you know,and it was just like Oh playing cords after playing base for so long. I waslike. Oh I forgot about that feeling. You know t e. They both have their. You know ther their reasons to exist.It's not like a judgement called, but it's just like when you're writingmelodies and you have all that cordal stuff happening. You know it's adifferent experience absolutely and they they have different functions, andI guess the police is a perfect example of that. You know y a band like Y W.Yes, Chris Qire wrote a lot of that stuff. So you know a lot of that wasbase driven. I guess Um Ri. U Rush! You know that stuff was very base driveen andevery instrumental every part was equally important and- and I would loveto get into a situation like that in the future. You know yeah yeah again,those are bands and, I think, they're, all sort of together riding those songs.So you have everything right there, but sitting in a room by yourself, it'slike. Well, how can I get the most notes out of something you know? That'swhy keyboard's Wer? You know I don't...

...know yeah, and I find that when I writefor someone else, it comes out a lot easier because I don't have like his Umpersonal connection to it. As much like I get super critical to the point whereyou know it could stop me it. It could like hinder my progress as, as a youknow, a writer, so e Yo know wh n, when I, when I did that movie and I had towrite for for that film. You know the director gave me h the concept she gaveme the setting. You know what it's supposed to be about, and she told mewhat it's supposed to sound like who you know who she imagines. Pr wouldperform it. So you know I I did a song that was very much like peaches. I didanother song that sound a little bit like Averil, like you know, so I wasable to shape it towards that concept and it was easier because you know Ididn't have to get in the way of it or I didn't Keel the nee to get in the wayof it right. Yeah, that's really tricky yeah, it's dreaky not to get caught upin your own stuff too, and I I had a guy tell me I was like don't ever writeabout anything personal and then you listen to some of my favoritesongwriters and like it's all personal, but but I do think, there's a balance.You know, I think it gets too personal. It almost becomeslike you're as a lititer you're, like I don't thinkI should be hearing about this. You know this seems like miht eeen. In thisconversation you know t it becomes a bit of confessional right, yeah and I think that's where I get alittle. You know stuck too, because I am a very you know. I am a very openperson. You know I'm Ery, you know I. I love Vulnerable People. I love peoplewho are honest about who they are. You know, and I would love to have that inmy music, but I don't want it to be obvious. You know, I think there shouldbe a creative kind of art to it. Where y you don't have to tell themeverything about your story. You don't have to you got to make it somewhatrelatable. You know right, yeah, yeah for sure, O that's cool. Well, we should probablywrite a song together. Sometimes I would love that that'd be so fun, Yeahwell, Youre righttoo right. So I yeah, I have a few records out and lately I've been t's as soon as the gigs stopped. I justsort of happened on a I don't want to say a publishing deal, but a publisherIHAD got hooked up with t e publish, Er was looking for yacht rock songs, andso I did like four off just really quick just and it was so much fun towrite that stuff, because I love Michael McDonald and Holla oads and allthat stuff so M. I had that's probably the most recent stuff. I wrote it's Ot,something I would put out necessarily but so much fun, yeah, Oso, melotic,there's so much rich harmonies and that's music and a lot of yeah likevocal, harmonies and and ye the cords are so rich. You know, l man, yeah andyou get to be. You get to play jazz yeah. It has nop music, you know what Imean so Rogie was war masters, Wi, Gosh Yeah. Speaking of that, I I played twogigs with Ambrosia 'cause, Jo Puerta. Their base player had sod shouldersurgery, oh Wowho, I filled in for him and he sang on the Gig he didn't play,but he sang you know, and I I love their hits. You know, but I didn'treally know that much about them as a ban, and you were talking about how yourecently just did the progr thing Wul when I started learning those sings. Iwas like what I mean. The rest of their catalogue is Progu Rock. You know fromHell it's it's INSE, on, like thirteen eights into in the twelve night Idodn't even Enn, tow the fractions at t at the end of be tri. Ere Incredible.You know so man, one of the hardest gigs. I thought I was like just goingto be playing these great little, smooth, jazz rock. You know yacht rocksongs, but so much fun, but to add to it, there's Jo Puarta standing in frontof me only the whole night, just the guy who recorded these baselines- andyou know- and we had done one skipe session together and then we weresupposed to do a soundcheck rehearsal and of course they were like well Um.You know they want us to sound check at one o'clock, but the KIK's not 'till.Eight. So you mind if we just move it back to like six and then I'm like yess as long as we got time to go through the songs and stuff he's like yeah, weprobably won't but you'll be good right, sure O it was an experience. But Oh my goshtalk about it's like they're, deceptively thyre, they're yacht rock,yes, but then the rest of their songs are just crazy, prog rock it's! So it'sgood stuff. Ryeah! Definitely I mean W that definitely captures a time to anmusic. Where you know people were more...

...about more mmalodies and morechallenging harmonies. You know, Um you K Ow, that was the seventies right. Themid Seventiesyeahyeah yeah and I think holinotes were pretty Prague in thebeginning too yeah yeah, definitely probably a little on the softer side ofit, but lots of cords lots of melodies and, like that's my favorite stuff forsure so having the opportunity. Somebody asking Mo Writ Yacht Rock, 'like hell, yowll right yacht rock. That was one of the gigs that Um I I missed out on because of theCararantine we we were supposed to do this cruise. I forgot the name of thecruise. It was the Moody Bluescrews, Oh cool and Um Fernando, and I were goingto do like this whole seventies thing. This whole yacht Roh thing, and youknow it's just kind of it's coming back. I think you K Ow, sed Ot, these musicTu Otally, making it come back. I mean for years. It was all about theeighties, but now it's like seventies or the nineties yeah, and if you haveXm radio, they have a whole yachtrock channel that I I used to have it I justI let it expire recently, but h I just couldn't get off that channel. Like Ijust listen to to Iraq, you know twenty four seven is just oh yeah, so I it's funny that you say that, becauseYo I do, these quarantine shows where you ow on face book live where I justplay a bunch of requests and stuff and the stuff that I really gravitatetowards is the stuff like the o, the Ambrosia Nicolette Larson. You KnowCarley Simon Um, Carol, King, you know and Knorandom stuff like the Orleans, but a y but y Robbie depred. So when is your next facebook live show?Do you do you schedule these or you just you just do hem at randomom? Well,lately it's been random, but I'm hoping to do a steady one on Friday nights umat five PM Pacific Time. So you know my east coast. Family could watch it ateight o'clock, their time. Yeah and I'm I'm hoping that it'llbecome a a weekly thing very soon, very a well. It's it's probably our future,so es yes, Yoa it. It's really cool because I I get to like you know, workon my guitar skills, Ond, my keyboard skills and stuff, and you know revisitstuff that I've always wanted to do like. There was one time where I justkind of you know made it like a caraoke session, where I just like sang some ofmy my favorite stuff, and I sang like a Barbara strisent. Do you remember themain events? Yes, yeah, the movie yeah like right, yeah, yeah, yea, Oi's, so muchfun. I mean that song is, is a ride. That's just takes you on like arollercoastaride and yeah, so I kind of make it fresh and silly and goopy- andyou know I I I think that's the trick too. You know to to have one with it.Yea make people smile and stuff and forget about things for a moment. Doyou have any great advice for the up and coming next baseplayer that's goingto take our jobs? I I think it's you know Um, I guess trust yourself and H. don'tlimit yourself to one thing. You know it's! It's really. You know it's greatto be open to any kind of opportunity. Just because you know you may not becomfortable doing something. If you get an opportunity, take it right, Atyouknow 'cause. You never know where it's going to lead. You Right, so you sang for Linda Ronstead,apparently yeahwell. I this is through the Peter Connection.So you know Peter does a memore and Um Yoa k. We were on tour a couple ofmonths ago and in his memor show he talks about how hemanaged and produced Linda and Um. Her documentary was h. You know coming outshortly after that and she was also honored at the Kennedy Awards and Um. So I he added Alinda Song in the in theshow for me to sing, and I sang blue by you and yeah, and then we went to SanFrancisco at club called Bimbo. I think it's three sixty five and she showed upOhmyeah yeah and they told me that she might they told me she might, but theydidn't say it while we were on stage, but I kinda had a feeling she was outthere yeah. It was a pretty excitingexperience for me and I got to meet her afterwards and t was just...

...so surreal such an honor and she'sshe's such a sweet woman, and so so, smart and brilliant and Um Yeah.It was. It was quite a memory. I was quite an in and an experience. I reallygrateful for it. Yeao cool yeahit was really a greatexperience. I mean it's one of those things that you never expect wouldhappen right, yeah, exactly she's, a she's, a legend, it's fun to bumpelbows with legends for sure. You know an heroes, you know yeah and I was likeon he stage with her manager and her produer right and who builds Hewho,discovered James Taylor yeah. You know it was just surreal. Do you have thosemoments when you're on stage like Oh yeah, when you see the people that you'reworking with and you're like? Oh my God, I remember when I listened to theirrecord. You know twenty years thirty years ago, you know ever imagine that you would be playingwith them. It's I know it's. Those are thefavorite. Those are my favorite times. You know, that's really why why I keep doing this. You know there'sa lot. It's you know. It's a great life, obviously, and it's been really fun andis turned out Grat, but it's a struggle as well. You know there's some need tohave those moments that you're talking about there's some some poll towardsjust interacting with these people that inspires you so much and and H it's itmakes it all worth it yeah and I don't know if you get this,but you K ow. Just when I think I'm out you know it's. It's Kindof likethat Alpocino thing. Just when I thought I was out, they pulled me backin again. You know I have these moments like okay. Maybe this is it. Maybe thisis the end of my career. Maybe there's nowhere else to go and then sure no Y,I get a phone call or I get an email about something or you know someoneremembers me from a couple of years back and you know revisit some projectthat that happened. You know fifteen years ago yeah he just heer. No, butyou know I feel, like a part of, I think one of the things Ianother thing I want to say, or the advice I want to give is- istrust the universe. You know it's like you know, see the signs. You know if,if, if you see that you have an opportunity again, it's like sees theopportunity. If you have that opportunity go for it, you know it'sit's a message: it's a blessing, it's not a you know it's a gift to be ableto do what we do and you know we. We constantly need to be reminded of thattoo. If you know, because if, if we're just by ourselves, you know there's noone else motivating us, like you know. I I'm here into this one apartment bymyself and, and it coul get very lonely and very isolating very quickly, and Icouldsit sit in my thoughts. You know way too long. You know ou get reallydepressed about things or you know I could you know Um pick up the phone and and call someoneand then get deeply inspired and then all of a sudden, a song can come out ofit right yeah. It was so great talking to you Ye er, coming on the show and Um, andyou know telling us about yourself O. Thank you for her inviting me. I had agreat time man. I got a lot out of thatconversation. A lot to take in that was so great. I hope I hope that wasenjoyable for everyone listening. I thought it was interesting, herwanting to be in a band and wanting to have a voice on the base and expressingherself, because it's something I've sort of struggled with in my journeyhere on music 'cause in the beginning, I was in bands. Everyone kind of startsthat way: You're in high school you're, trying to find friends and and peopleto play with and and getting like minded people to get along for anysustained. You know amount of time just always seemed way too challenging for me is more like I want a leadereither there's a either on the leader and you're the sidemen or I'm a sidemanand you're. The leader either way works for me. But to have some sort ofleadership is always you know it works easier for me, but other people can'tstand that model either. You know and H, obviously she's more into the bandthing an and I think you have more of the same musically. Obviously, ifyou're a band person versus and that's not always true, there there's acombination of the things or artists that have bands, so they are a leader,but they still want to hear what you have to say. You know there's bands,like older bands like Chicago, they only have a few original members, sothere's other guys that are sidemen in that band, but they're in that band Um.But it's interesting and I think, being a band is trickier. I think you're taking more of a riskfinancially in a way because now you're trying to to make this thing happenwith your muorigial music and having to sell that trying to get sign trying toget a following versus being a Sideman...

...a lot of times, you're just jumping onthe coat tails of of what someone else is Dong. So it's a little easier fromit's been easier. In my experience to just make money, you know andjus SAINGMI sustain myself financially, so I don't know it's, but it's. I think it'san important thing to find out about yourself and and realize no, because itcan shape your entire career, and I don't think that means you have to pickone or the other, because a lot of people might have a Sideman Gig thatfinancially supports their band, that they're in as well, and they can allwork together. But I just think it's a good thing to know about yourself andwhat you prefer so that you can navigate through this business in a way.That's going to end with you being happy and musically satisfied some things teclarify. She is the termshedding which means to practice. The full term is a woodshedding and thestory that I heard at Berkeley and if you have a different story o pleaseemail me at fan: Mail at Divebar, Rock Star, Dot Com, but the story I heardwas about Charlie Parker and he started playing his instrument, a d. He went toplay some jams and do some gigs and he was just horrible, so he went away andspent a whole year just hanging out in his woodshed shedding. You knowpracticing honeing his skills and then he came back and he was phenomenal. Soif you never heard the term shedding or woodshetding Um, you can do that. Ilook it up because I looked it up and I couldn't get a straight story, butthat's the story. I heard Alsosoul fedge in case you don't know, is DoremiFassolatido, which is just another way of speaking music, and I was a littleconfused during the conversation ecause she kept saying see and she would playa B and there's also another s. That is the sharp of sow, so Dore Mifaso swould be a half step above so so I was a little confused aut. You meant Cbeing confused with t which would be a halfstep below the root, or you know amajor seven above the route so anyways. I was a little confused by I listenback and now I get it so, hopefully y you probably knew it the whole time,but anyway also my teacheruberkl was John Rapuci and he was great he's. Agreat teacher he's a great player. It was just not a awesome fit for me and, of course, cool stuff comes fromall places: Lots of places, not just New York City. I just really love itthere. Well, I hope you guys had a great time. Wow you've made it to the end, I'mhoping it's because you completely enjoyed yourself and are now filledwith knowledge and inspiration to move forward with your dreams. If that isthe case, and you would like to stay informed of new episodes live eventsand General News, please go to dive Bar Rockstar, dotcom and sign up for themillinist. If you have any questions, comments, corrections or complaintsabout anything you hear on the show. Please email me at Ban Mail at DibarRock Star DOTCOM and you may even end up on the show we at the Dibar RockStarpod, as with all of our hearts. Thank you for listening and remember.It's all about dreams.

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