Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
The Dive Bar Rock Star Podcast
The Dive Bar Rock Star Podcast

Episode 27 · 10 months ago

Greg Camp- I Love Left Turns (Smash Mouth, The Selectrics)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Songwriter, Guitarist, Vocalist, Greg Camp recalls his days in the world famous pop/punk band, Smash Mouth. He talks about his experience as the main songwriter and what it’s like writing for someone else’s voice. He reveals his songwriting process and the difference between writing pop songs and writing for film. Greg tells some of the stories behind the songs on his solo record, Defektor. He talks about working with his wife in their band, The Selectrics, and explains his love of the Fender Jazzmaster guitar.


Defektor:

https://open.spotify.com/album/27WoLfDWg1by5ibZetZARr?si=SKyoVqzqSRShN4d85WuIew


The Selectrics:

https://open.spotify.com/album/5FCI3KdTOs2uXrpC4axUjo?si=6877IQyMT7yd8fDQCIRjUw


www.divebarrockstar.com

If you are a fan of the dive Ar RocksStar podcast and would like to help support the show, there's a great waythat you can do that and start a new fashion trend. We have a newmerchandise page on the website, which features t shirts and hoodies that areavailable for sale on Amazon, just click on merchandise, ind, the top menuand all of the links will be there or go directly to dive Ar rockstarcommerchandise, get started early on your Christmas shopping at Divebar,rockstarcom. Welcome to the Divar Rock Star, podcast,the show exploring the lives of professional musicians of all typestouring, musicians, recording artist, songwriters engineers, bar bands,wedding bands and anyone making their living in the music industry, whetheryou've dreamed of being a professional or you already are one. This is thepodcast for you, I'm your host Eric Banes, and I hope that you not onlyfind some entertainment here, but also some helpful tips, trade secrets andideas that will help you achieve your dreams. So I am really excited today, becausewe have another bonafied rock star on the PODCAST and all star. I guess youcould say, and we also get to talk about one of myfavorite subjects, which is songwriting, and we haven't really been able todelve that far into that. Yet here on the on the dive, far rocks or podcast. So it's and it's a topic that I reallylove talking about. It's something that I've worked really hard for the courseof my career to become better at, and so it's always a joy and a privilege to talk tosomeone who has written huge hits that have impacted all of our lives. And my guess today is an incrediblesongwriter. Ho's written some of my favorite hits from the late S andtwosands. You might recognize a few titles like walking on the Sun when themorning comes Pacific Coast Party and the monster hit all star from hisformer band smashmouth. He was a founding member, the guitar player andthe main songwriter for the band. He also put out a solar record calleddefector in two thousand and eight that has recently been rereleased on all thestreaming platforms he's had his music in countless moviesand TV shows in including Shrek Family Guy, half baked the simpsons dancingwith th stars, kissing, booth, one and two, and he recently scored his firsthorror. Film called Diary Die Ry, which is out now. He also has a really coolband, with his wife called the selectrics, so there's all kinds ofstuff to check out on spotify or wherever you stream he's anunbelievably talented and creative guy and he's really cool. So please enjoy my conversation with GregCamp. So, of course you were the foundingmembor of the band mashmouth Yep and play guitar and the main songwriter andwas the the band formed when you joined, because I heard you say I anotherinview that you didn't have anything to do with thename yeah I mean it's. It was basically these two guys,you know Steve Parwell and the original driverKevin Inello, and they did all kinds of funny things tomake quick money. You know so some of them not so legal, and they just you, know, they're, likeokay, we've tried all these other things, you know stealing stuff andselling stuff and Blah Blah Blah and and Seno Steve had a short, hip, hopcareer heas, a rapper actually got himself a record dealing everything youknow, and so he proved that he could do that without any like real musicalexperience and- and so he just decided, he wanted to put a band together likean alternative rockband, but he needed a guitarist and someone to write songsbecause he couldn't write, songs and, and so they sort of like came lookingfor that, like in the club scene in San Jose, and they found me and basicallyyou know forced me to be in the band. Otherwise I don't know what would havehappened. You know they were scary, guys you know, and and so, and it was fun they were justthey were fun. People and Theyre theywere super dangerous and it was. Itwas fun for me, you know, and I never thought that it would get as far as itdid. It's just you know, you know, you just never know right, so I mean that'sreally how it's form but yeah. They had the name Fash mout already in place,and I brought my friend Paul de Lile...

...the base player, and then we were for,and you know we started, recording and right writing andrecording and back then we were friends with thelittle known guy named Carson daily, who was a radio DJ a station in SanJose called Ko me and Ka rock ended up buying KALAMEOR. Theywere like a sister station with clear channel or something, and so hewas playing thus on the radio. You know it was one of those like classic thingswhere he would like lock the door and we would be smoking cigarettes anddrinking beer and playing our music on the radio on a big radio station. Youknow program directors, Go, you know, Bang on on the door like what the ffyou doing and there you know and and then and then he got moved toKrock and he basically took us with him and Tita. It was like the next day wehad a record deal y. It wasn't supposed to happen. Basicallyit just did you know right yeah because it doesn't seem like you guys did thething where you played a bunch of shows and your built to following you justn't have had so by the time you started touring like what kind of conditionsare you touring? Do you have a bus at this point or you you didn't have to gothrough the were in a van kind of thing, or did you still in the very beginnings?You know we did like you know, drive in, like our parents, minivan down to LosAngeles and play you know the eigh eight o'clock slot or like the midnightslaughtat like coconit teaser or you know, Wyou know like one of theseplaces that just a shitties spot ever and you know you play like for you-know ten people and try to get get some music heads in there and Blah Blah Blah.I mean we did that sort of thing, but we never had a real following. In fact,most people hated us in San Jose and span as seen as we got a record dealboy, those the local bands, just they despised us they're like how you know,we've been trying to do this for twenty years. Man, you know, and I all of asudden were you know that, but yeah we did jump from. You know parents Manivanto Prevo yeaho quickly. We didn't have to. We didn't have to tour in a in avan with a uhall or anything like that. Ever you know wow knowit's, likeprivilege, privlege band guys. You know rightright well and you know because Steve obviously a great salesperson. He wasvery, very good at that which every band needs. You know. Well, that'sthat's the lead singer. It's like I mean that's their Gig, that's their job,theyre, that', they're, so good at it. That's why we love that and you know theyre, that's what they'regood at and had you so you had been songridingbefore another bands. Before you got yeah I mean forever. You know I mean you know since high school, you know,as always, ben bands like cover bands and original bands, there's always boat.You know the cover band was paying the bills. The original band was was payingthe soul, you know and jis wridan songs and in fact the song you know e smashmouts very first hit was written for the band before smashmount, a that Iwas in and the so the song just didn't fit withthe band, and you know they didn't. They didn't accept it or whatever, andso it just kind of sat on a cassette in the shoe box in my closet until thedrummer of smash mouth. U said, Hey, what's that and I'm like? Oh there's,just some old songs. You know that nobody likes he's like well, let melisten to it and he pulled that one and, and then that was that so anein, that'swalking on the sun. Yes, that's so interesting because you know you guyswere kind of a so punk band kind of with the exception of that song in away it still didn't fit in really yo n yeah it. It was very strange yeah Imean it wasn't put another thing that wasn't really supposed to be. You knowwe were going down this dur down this road of like just aggressive. You knowpunk pop, you know with a SCA thing to it or something and and then that song just kind of fellout of nowhere, and so we basically just sort of wentwell. I guess we better do that. You know it's so. The second album sounds alittle more like that yeah right, which is interesting, because I already thinklike when you listen to it. It's like already. You were taking all theelements of what was popular with the punk and the pop puck and the Scotthing,and you already had kind of this unique thing and then it was like. Oh wait.Here's a whole different left turn. You know, I don't know yeah, it was crazy,I mean, and it you know, with the producer Ar Valentine. You know it'slike he really kind of made everything...

...cohesive at that point. You know, eventhough people did buy the record from that song and when they got the recordthey're like. What's this yeah, we want more, we want more walking onthe suns, you know, and so you know we had to yeah. What do you call it? The the suggestionbox filled up quickly. You know we're like okay, all right, we got it, we gotit right and how much of the sound of that was Eric Valentine, like versusyour original demo. Of that, like the VA, a lot was eric. You knowit's Liki me, but the thing wish about Eric was he. He definitely saw the vision. You know, and you knowI was the only one that was actually recording music at that point in theband. You know nobody else, they're just kind of playing their instruments,but I was writing and recording stuff in my bedroom. I always done that sincehigh school, and so he basically took the demos. You know that I was that Ihad already recorded, and I just sort of realized them and just said, okay,this song, I hear your concept, but we need to need to really realize this concept andyou know make it sound like that for real. You know, God so he's a very bigpart of this Tona, obviously Isa. Fifth, the fifth guy of Minband, you know, andwhere did that song come from? It was actually just a little bit after likethe Rodney King stuff. That was happening and just all this, the socialstuff that that's just it's. It's always happening, it's always there,but it was televised and it was huge and there was a lot of tension, a lot ofracial atention, and you know just a lot of lines were drawnand that song was basically just written about that time. That had happened like K w a year ortwo before the BA that band that I was im and yeah. It's just you know it'slike. We need to get our ship together or or you know we might as well be fuckingthe sun. I guess you know like just I don't know, really know what I wasgoing for back then, but looking back, I'm pretty sure, that'swhat I meant you know. Well, it makes it a you know.Unfortunately, a timeless concept. Yeah, it has come up a few times. You knowpeople are like wow. It's like that was almost like a prediction like I wasn'ta prediction: It's happened many many times in the history of humans. You know so so then. At that point they musthave been like. Okay, we need a dozen more walking on the suns for this nextrecord and at that point, did it start to feel like? Okay? Now I'm asongwriter like I have a job to do. I've literally got to like recreatethis, and did it become more of a job at that point than just you know, it'smore fun to just be like I'm going Ta write whatever I want now. It's like no,I kind of have to deliver another record. That's going to be like thisand yeah I mean yes, but it became the job that it always wanted, and so itdidn't. I would never call it a job, you know what I mean. I would call itthat's my role in the band. You know it's like it's. My role to you know to make sure that this keepson going, and you know that's I'm like the ingredient of the band. For thatthing you know, and so yeah I had to you know I had to basically concoct anentire body of work. You know for the second record that revolved around thatsound that had been successful for us and so obviously had to get EricValentine on board. I I think what we did was we rented a house up in the mountainsand in the garage we kind of built it outto be a rehearsal space and a little spot in the corner. For me to record Nmy ideas and right and stuff like that, and I just did that, for you know Ican't remember how many months, but maybe like six months after the tour, Istarted riding on the tour, but once we got off you know I needed to kind of lock myself in a room and andfigure it out. You know so right. You know the whole s thing that we that that happened with walking on theSun. You know that that is something that Eric Vallentine and I that's ourthat's our jam. You know W at I mean we loved, we would just sit around andlisten to records and go. Oh man it'd be so cool to make something like that,like that Bert backrack song or that Zombie Song or you know, monkeys or youknow whatever, and so we just like listen to a ton of records and justsort of started gong all right. Let's, let's do this. Let's make a pop recorda modern pop album that ha as a lot of these elements and let's have fun withit. He already had really super cool old vintage gear and it was easy torecreate a lot of the tones that we were looking for and we just need thesongs you know, and so again I had this...

...little eight track. Digital eight trackthing and I was using breakbeat records, so I had O turntable and you know a base and a guitar and aCassio Keyboard, and I basically wrote the whole record like that with thoseinstruments and took that recorder to Eric Fallentine'studio and we plugged it in we just created sessions and basically replacedthe stuff that didn't work or needed to be. You know, updated sonically and wejust that's T, that's how we did it. The record was kind of already recordedonce and then we basically it's like tracing paper Y, a a I mean right. Itwas there we just made it better. You know that's cool, so you use those demoelements that you had already done. They end up on the record a lot of thestuff yeah. So it was this. The first time like in your other bands, were youwriting for the band or where you sing and lead, because I know you sing aswell. Was this the first time you're writing for another lead? Singer yeah,I guess it was. You know I mean ind th, like I said in the band before this one.There were two singers and I was one of them, and so I would write my parts andhe would write his part. So you know that was kind of what it was, but yeahin this in this one. Definitely writing for another singer with this is thefirst time I think and was Gina an adjustment. It was because he, like Isaid you know he and the drummer weren't necessarilymusically inclined before this all happened, and so you know I couldn'twrite. You know intricate melodies and things like that. You know or get totoo far ahead of whatwhever. He was you know right and which worked out great,because it's a lot easier to. I don't know about you. I mean it'slike you read great songs, you know, and your songs are very melodic andthank you if you yeah, they also have simplicity to them, andsometimes I just kind of get a little too crazy to the point where it's it'snot cool. It's pretty uncool. You know it's almost it's almost Muso and Idon't know it just gets too much. You know it's like. I Love Bert, back rackand I love Elvis Costellan. I love these really melodic motherfuckers, but they have a place and smashmouth wasn'tthe place to be. Writing like that, and so I had to really simplify themelodies and stuff and it worked out to my favor and everyone's in favor ofeveryone. You know it's just it's simple, but it has some there's somestuff behind it. You know there's some a lot of melotic stuff and a lot ofweird chords and interesting things that happened, but at the same timeyour normal average jock could hom balong to it. You Know Soso, do you youthink that made you a better wrider in the end, I think it taught me how to Haw to relax a little bit and just youknow you kN we're not. This is not BethovenDude, you know like don't trip out, and this is not Shakespeare. You know people want to beable to wrap their ahead around it without hurting themselves, and youknow so yeah mad me and I'm not saying I'm some like genius or smarter othinglike that, but I just really gravitate towards very melodic stuff. You KnowEltin John, for instance, you know it's incredibly melodic and very hard topull off. You Know Yeah Bir, top Bernie Topan is is word Smith and so right Ienjoy doing that and listening to that, but for smashmout they really needed tokind of come down a little bit. You know. Well I'm a huge fan of youwriting. So I know exactly what you're talking about, but I love it. I don't,I think it's cool well, thank you man, because also harmonically. You like togo places. You know that that's kind of a that's where you leave pop you knowas soon as he's changed keys for the precourse or something you know what Imean right, but it makes it so interestingto listen to O. It's just yeur candy, you know, but I love left turns and lately you knowin music. In the last few years, he've been so many nice left turns and I'mloving it. You know I've been kind of just listening to defector all day andt I just I can't stop listen to some of those. Those tunes. Just speaking ofleft turns it's like it's just ear, candy, it's so there's so much going onand it's so so cool that Zombis Zon parade no yeah.I just can't stop listening to it, plus that major seven harmony, just kind oflike man it just well. Maybe we could talk about that record in a minute, butanyway I thought that that's pretty interesting because it does sort offorce you to stay in bounds, which is what I kind of enjoy about writing. Popsongs is all the rules, but not always...

...you know what I mean. Sometimes it'sfun to just do whatever, but en the other times it's like it's like apuzzle. How do I make this cool yet stay within the lines? You know what Imean exactly yeah, like the parameters. Are there and the formulas there an ITworks and so yeah? Don't don't change it too much. You Know Yeah Arrangement Wise, you know it'slike that's, been a very difficult thing totry to fit into the way things are arranged these days. Youknow it's like you know. There was a time when there was this arrangement formula, and you know:There's like an intro and a cookn, an a verse and a pre and a chorus and alittle spot between the next versond. You know and a so lower and MELOTICSA.You know now it's like chorus chorus, Corus Course Co and the you have to do that. It's likeI remember when that when that arrangement blueprint started- and I was like, whywould they waste five choruses on one song when they could have had a wholerecord full of hits? Ou know I know, is crazy and the other thingthat that blows my mind and is so refreshing when I whend you know, lookat your credits or like look at your songs. Now, there's like six to eightnine writers on these songs that have three couruses or whatever you look atyour big hits and it's just Greg Camp, and that was odd too. I remember whenthat started happening. You know we would go to like the BMI awards and Iwould be standing up there. You know just me and somebody you knowwhoever was talking about the award right and then then I'd go sit down andand up for best. You know country song whatever, and there would be likefifteen people up there and I'ld be like wait like did they let bring theirfriends or something is that is that an entrerage ORHA pass? Is that a posse?What's going on here? You know, there's no, every single one of those peoplewrote this song, I'm like Oh okay, yeah! I did. I didn't get it, but now I meanit's totally normal. Now Yeah Yeah, it's wild. I think I mean you guys. Ewere like the end of the s two and like the s was the last big time of themusic industry in a way right, like people are still buying records, and you know you could still purchase music,you know and- and it was still sort of the end of the old school way of doingeverything I know it's like I mean we were. I thank my lucky stars all thetime and you know, and when I talke to Paul the lile. The base player forSmash Mouth, we are weare constantly like we're justvery thankful that we got up through that kind of like that hole in theclouds. You know before it's closed, you know and we did sell a bunch of records.Physical records and people did listen to more than one song. You know yeah.We just feel very fortunate blessed to I've been there for that. You know inthe very last one of those bands that did that you know and do you miss. Iknow you've been putting out singles here and there, but you also write fora TV and film a lot and do you miss writing a record versus singles, yeahand funny you should mention so you know just over you know,especially in the last you know, year or whatever, since we've been sort oflocked down s like a accumulating songs and- and I will put something out andthat's kind of why I rereleased defector, you know, in fact I didn'teven realize that it wasn't out. I just thought I just thought it was out.Nobody cared you know, and so, when I went to look for it and I like Oh, noone can get it and so just put it out myself. You know but same same thing.It's like I mean I thought about it. You know it's like. I really do justwant to put out like an EP. You know I'm not going to bore people with youknow twelve songs or eighteen songs. Ip just do like fouror five, but you knowI think that there's a couple batches of those ready to be released, and soI'm going to do that pretty quick here, very cool. Well, I'm excited me too. So are you still working with smashmoute from time to time? I know they just put out the acoustic version of of which for Human Chumaing Yeah. I guess I'venever year hat out loud, but yeah yeah, they sort of like every once in awhile. You know they'll say: Hey we're going to go. Do this, do you want to bea part of it? You know and just depending on what it is. You know- andthat was one of the things you know the ACUSE TAC recor they're like we'regoing to rerecord the first record on acoustic guitars and like you're, crazy...

...and they're like well. Do you want todo it? I'm, like you, know at first ats kind of not really because that'sthat's a dumb idea. You know and they're Likh well we're just goingto get someone else to play on the fan. I'm likeokay now I gotto do it yeah,because I mean I wanted. I wanted. If theyere going to do it, I wanted to atleast Tacke a stabit. You Know Bash in thosepunk rock songs out on a Kista Guitar. You know, you know which we used to doit at radio. You know, like you know, you've done those radio morning showswhere you, you probably bring an acistic base, andjust you know, enup do the songs, you know, and so we done it before it. Justnever really sounded very cool, and so anyway yeah. So I did that record with themand then I did go back and play with them a couple times. You know for a fewstints, you know, but you know I'd rather just kind of hang out and thencovid happened, and so that was that so right. But it's nice that you know it'ssomething that you can pop in and out of, and you know it's not because youknow bands they're tricky and these guys were your friends and you knowit's like having a marriage of four people. Five people, you know yeah, soit's good that yeah, I mean you're at least on speaking terms, and you can goin and out and U now I don't know yeah I mean like,like I said Paul and I are. We are lifelong friends base player we even if sometimes we don't agree onstuff or if there's some sort of like legal crap that goes on still to thisday between you know me being separated from the band and some of the thingsthat come up. You know it's like Paul and I still will put our friendshipabove that and put the legal shit aside and youlet. Let e the adults Hash throughit. Righ yeah, but but he's really, you know as far as like the original members of that band,you know it's the only one that I really stay in contact with, so you a big fan of the fendered jazz master,absolutely and that's kind of your signature sound like how did that comeabout. When did you get your first fender jazz master, an it's funny,because I was always kind of like into strats. You know, and mainly becauseit's just all I ever had when growing up playing. You know I just I had oneand I just never strayed from it very much and everytime I did it was just like. Oh my God, it's like trying to relearn how to playguitar or something it's just. I I don't know my way around and it's hardand you know or dretches for too big or you know I love the way these otherguitars sounded. But I was just lazy. I think- and I remember I bought a jazzmaster and I tried so hard to make to get the sound out of that thing that Iwas hearing. Other people get right and I ended up end up selling it gettingrid of it and then fender. You know I got a sponsorship or an endorsementwith fender and they're like what would be your guitar, your Ultimate Guitar,you know if we were to build one for you in the custom shop and if my GodDang it, I want a jazz master with this, these kind of pickups and this sort ofconfiguration and that color and Blah Blah Blah, and they made me one and itjust that's where, when it all turned around like okay, this is goingto work.This is Goingna work, because before that the smashmoth they played a moseright like an old ixor, sixty four mose right, densers to which was like ashorter scale thing right and that think that thing just had the bratdiestsnottiest sound, and so that's what I played with the band godbut. I couldn'tkeep that thing in one piece on tour: it just kept falling apart. It was very, I don't know it was so old and it hadbeen played to hell, and so that's when they made me the guitar and t that'swhen I switched and now I just play stock jazz masters, there's nothingspecial Boutom, just American made jazz masters, Yeah tose right! That's that'sthe sound! That's like that's what mades an original sound! You know!That's that'sit is I mean theya. The whole first record was was the mostright and even the second record had a bunch of Mos right on it, but you knowlike since I'V, since I messed my hand up I'm out here and the only thing theonly guitar that I have is this classical this nylan tring classicaland then, and so I haven't, played an electric guitar in like five months.You know my lovely dog was running after somebody or some dogor something like that and I tried to grab her us she's running full speed.Past me and my my finger got caught in her collar and ripped my left...

...basically just ripped it to pieces. Myleft saw my left. Can The moneymaker my guitar playing hand and how is itplaying it is it? Is it going to get back to normal? Is Everything workingright and is for yeah? I mean I had a pin going through the finger and I hada button holding te, tendonin and all kinds of Ityeah, my dog. She did a did a numberon it, and- and so I am now- I don't know if youcan see like like about a month ago. I could only close my hand about that.Much and now, and now it's like it's pretty good yeah, it's these twofingers are yeah. I'm pointing out my pinkie and my ring finger. Aren't aren't all the way back, a hundredpercent but very close, and they will be nd. It's still. Everything works,though right everything works, yeah, it's funnybecause I don't know if you've ever not played for a period of time and thosecalouses go away. I mean this is the most I've not playedin in thirty years literally, and I had I did a session the other day. It's Idid a cover of long train running. That's that's! GOINTA come out probablyin the next week with a friend of mine, Walter Eno, and I did I probably did for takes, and myfingers were just shredded. Just dust plus plus I've been playing with Dwightfor three years, O three and a half years using a pick so so my right hand,just I don't have the calouses were gone anyways. You know I had a littlebit left an. I could almost get through a GIG and not right. Everything's gone,you know, so it's IT S. it's three days. Just for the blister to go down, youknow is like being in high school again, I know and then you're like yelling atyourself. You know you're like Dang it like I'm better than this. You knowit's like Knyeah yeah, the one thing about that, though, is that before you know before the accident myaccident, I would never just like pick up a guitar for the hell of it andstart playing, and when I couldn't play anymore, my perspective was, like you know, totally changed, and so now Ijust I want to play. I love playing again. You know it's just I got Tabuild that up, so it doesn't hurt anymore. But t like it's like when youfirst learn how to play. Do you remember how much it hurt? Yeah? Oh Yeah, yeah! Well, I'mremembering now you know so when you play when you play withWhite, does he prefer that use a pick? Yes,yeah every every song pick and e. You know fender jazz through a basement ampwith the the base on three. So I'm basic, I kind of think of myself moreas a barratone guitar player, because it's a lot of high end. A lot of midrange, not much low end. You know in the house it sounds different right.Yeah, the sound guyt front has has the bottom en going, but on stage it's it'sa lot of a lot of midrange. You know yeah whic is so man never really didbefore I got the Gig I mean I would play a pick occasionally on a sessionor something, but it wasn't my thing at all. So now I feel like I could do anything. You know with apick because I've had I've just had to you know so: trig, I'm Goa. Do you havelike a baic or any of those fender Baratonbase or anything or guitar? No, in fact, I don't even have vintage, I'mnot like the vintage guy. For a long time I was RMDB player so in the RMBand smooth jazz and stuff. It's like cutting edge new sounding base with agreat sound and that's becomes your sound right. I get into more inthecountry and rock, it's like. No. You have to have like twenty bases in casethey want a rick, an Bocker, sound or you know flat wounds or roundwounds.You know so I'm kind of catching up on that, but so mi mainly and I play five stringall the time right. I have a five string p base, that's about four yearsold and a fivestring jazz base. That's that one's probably close to ten yearsold. So that's no vintage yeah, another TNAT! I have like a modulist.That's I don't know twenty years old. Probably, but it's not. You know it's avery particular sound grapiht neck. You know it's not something you're going toplay on a smashmouth record. For instance, you know rightbut yeah, I'mkind of kind of got all brand new stuff, youknow, but but at the same time I love the vintage sound, I'm just starting toget into it. anyways, like maybe in the last five years, and then you know, Ithought tha. The high end bases were...

...expensive. If you want to go, find a aseventy, two pbase or something it's it's going to cost you astronomical manyeah. I Know B before the Internet. I remember like I mean I remember, beingon tour like for the first couple tours and like going to pon shops and findingthe greatest stuff you know and now that you just that's just not even athing anymore, theyre. Everyone knows what they have and they know how muchit's worth. yeathose days are gone. Yeah Welli know you through Mitchmarinewho's, the drummer for Dwight, and you know he played with spash Meut. That'show you guys know each other, I'm assuming right yeah, and so he was abase player for a minute and they en. I and he's kind of stopped doing it andhe had his seventy four P sitting in his. I think it's a seventy foursitting in his closet, so he's like hey man. I don't use this. If you want toyou know just take it andi plug it in and it's like. Oh, oh, that it soundsso good. So now I'm kind of obsessed with that- and I use that on you know,depending on the track, obviously, but but so now, I'm a little now I want likethree of those, so I can put all kinds of different strings on them and yeah.I don't know once covid gets over and I can get back to work. Maybe I'll have a opportuniy a little collection of stuffwith like weird flat wounds and rubber strings yeah totally. I have to confess something I lovebooks, but I don't love reading and it's been something that I've wrestledwith. Since I was a kid you know I can read, I have red books but they're verytime consuming and I've spent most of my time trying to build a music career.It which takes a lot of time, but one thing I definitely do a lot of- isdrivein L, a traffic on my way to a GIG and there's a solution that combinesthose two situations and it's called audiblecom. Otto has thousands of audiobook titles and you can listen offline anywhere any time the APP is free andcan be installed on all smartphones and tablets, and they have just a ton ofmusic related titles, like all you need to know about the music business byDonald S, passman how music works by David, Byrn or music production secretsby Calvin Carter, and you can get a free thirty day trial right now, if youvisit, audible, Trialcom dive bar rock star, that's audible, trialcomdive barrock star, I'd like to take a second to thank youfor listening to the dive bar rocks our podcast as a new podcast, getting theword out as a vital part of what it takes to keep the show on the road or off the road as the current case.Maybe if you would like to support the podcast all you got to do subscribewherever you listen and if you have an extra minute or two neese leave areview, you can also share and follow the podcast on your social media, apps, okay enough begging, I hope you'rehaving fun and once again thank you for listening talk about songwriting for a while fora minute because you you're writing a lot still right. Whatis your SAS like it's different every time? I guess you know it's likesometimes you know a lot of stuff. Just comes like first thing in the morning.You know first thoughts before I get you know bombarded by kidsand you know whatever else you knowbusiness or whatever it's like. I love to like escape, or you know, get on mybike or go for a walk or get in the car. I just kind of let everything process and that's where mostly ideas come. Youknow my phone is jam, packed full of those little ideas, and so I usuallyjust do that and then you know like right about this time andnight. You know it's about. Eleven o'clock for me or ten thirty orsomething for me here on the East Coast, is when you know I'll, go through thoseideas and just see if anything's sticking with me- and you know if theysurvived the day, if the idea survived the day, you know it's like, then I donormally know or if it's still in my head, I go there's something there. I'MGON NA I better go at least try to get something goingwith that you know, and so us usually it's music. It's a lot of beats come tomy head before anything. You know I'll Bei'll just have a group or somethingand just go on from that, and then here's a weird thing that I've I'vebeen bringing up a lot lately is the lyric. The writing lyric process issomething that I'm just I'm terrified of it and it's always like I'm. Just Idon't want to. I just don't want to. I don't know what to write. You know andas soon as I sit down with a good old fashioned pencil and a piece of paper,I can't stop. I just keep going and...

...then I go oh yeah I like doing this.You know I'm, why am I afraid of this? And but I never remember that when I don't know why it's is's the weirdestthing- and I love writing lyrics, but I just I'mnormally afraid to start doing it, but once I start I just I don't stop sointeresting. I think that's primarily my process right there. I have an ideain the morning if it sticks with me I'll hummit throughout the day andmaybe kind of work on it a little bit but at night time I'll sit down andlike really try to flesh it out, and so how often do you do that every day,just about Yeu, that's cool, so you've always got a can of songs s yeah I meanAjar Song sitting on the on the Tam yeah most of them turns, and but I you know, I always wondered aboutthat. Like back in the day, you know like the Brill building. You know, Iwonder how many times those guys just well. We have to write a bunch of turdsto come up with one amazing thing. You know and ow. You can't just sit downand write like one great song a year without writing a munch of shitty ones.You know y kind of have you have to do it. Youknow I A A it's a an exercise or somethingyou know right yeah. I think a lot of people don't realize that when theythat's a the problem that y a lot of young writers have, I think they thinkeverything that they do is amazing, yeah, probably Wen. Ninety eightpercent of it is not going to go anywhere. You know it's like keep.Writing Gep, keep going ye P, then right or just have to have the you know. You know like these days. Like I don'tknow, if you yeah, I know you have been in these situations where you're likein in a writer, think tank or whatever, when there's a couple songwriters and aproducer who's back there ticking away and making beats and stuff, and thenthe artist- and you know they really rely on that guyback there making beats and taken away and the artist to shine that turtup.You know I work and you can shine any anything these days. You knoweverything I mean you listen to the Radio D, no offense, no offense poppeople that wow right, you sure you sould have tricked a lot of people. Youknow yeah it's it's easy to get dark andstart sounding old, Dartaly buit. Then you, you know iny'ahall sound totally old right now my kids love the Beatles, and so we listenwhen we get in the car. And it's all you know it's all the kids. You knowthey want to listen the Beatle Channel on Xm, and so we just put it on andit's like you're constantly reminded of just how incredible those songs wereactually written. You know, and they didn't they didn't, really need a bunchof polishing they just, but that just that was a a bonus. You know yeah, butthey were poller. So well, you know well yeah nd. You hear stories aboutthem writing and they worked on it. It was a. It was a craft to them. Theydidn't just O. I've got some NEAT, you know they worked. You know they werkhismelodies and work that stuff and they polished and polished. You know oubefore anyone heard it. You know what I mean. Yeah t talk about puzzlepieces,you know they everything fit perfectly everything made sense. Everything wasthere for a reason. Yeah. You know just great just lyrically like when youget up to the Mike to sing it is it done? Do you have it all done and stuffore you one? That's still tweaking right up until you'r tracking yeah, I mean like the the nuts and bolt might bethere, but I always like I was listening to and I won't rememberthe name of it, but it was a screenwriter director and he was sayingnot only do the words need to mean something you know in a dialogue for ayou know for film, but they need to sound cool to and he sound good. Theyneed to roll off the tongue. Well, and you know for us it's the same, but they need to be,they need to rhythmically work. They need to be saying something. Of courseyou know whatever you're trying to get across, but they need to sound good.You know, words need to sound good. You know there are some words that just youcan't make sound good rihtyeah like I don't know banana or something you know you just like. There's just some wordsthit, just don't sound right, you know, and so I'll get up to the microphone yeah toanswer question you know it's like I'll, have written something and I'll go upthere and try to sing it and like that. That just is stinking up this wholeroom. It's just sounds so dumb, you know, and so with a couple tweeks youknow and maybe a good old fashioned. You know the sorisis or something...

...what's another word for hey seri.What's Eseri what rhymes with orange you knowright. I have my dictionary rhyming TAME APP on my phone tit's right itidnt, you know technology, you know it's Youse it. If you have it it's funny on that subject, I was just goingthrough like boxes because you know we're moving, and so I'm going throughthese boxes and there's like a ton of boxes and they all have you know thelittle you know loose leaf. You know or likepages you know, just like tons and tons and tons of lyrics and every couple ofthose books down below is a dictionary of some sort that I must have bought.Like a little crappy dictionary on the road or something this is beforeInternet and I smartphones and stuff like that, I ammust own. You knowtwenty five dictionaries and a bunch of like rhiming dictionaries and it's all kinds of weird. You knowhelpful books and stuff and they're just taking up space and nobody wantsthem just like going to salvation army anddonating all these funny little sources, and you can just see people that goingwwhat's that you know it's a book. L You should autograph them and SellHem on Ebay. This was used to get m. get me throughastrolounge, exactly ithis one was I used for all star Yeah. You could justlike underline all the words from all star in it ince it's yeah used it foralster right. He songs, don't writ themselves, youknow, so they. So most of these tongs startin your head before Ito, an instrument yeah, that's kind of cool. So once youget to that instrument, is it usually a guitar or or a keyboard? Or It's alwaysa guitar? You ow, okay, I don't know what I have keyboards and I have pianos andstuff like that in my house, and I don't know what it is man, my braindoesn't work. You know it's like. I can teach myself be songs. You know likepretty good songs, I'll, forget it the next day totally forget it. I don'tunderstand what EIT's supposed to look like Lik, my fingers, you know to meanI don't like the shapes are so foreign. You know, then, from guitarthat it just doesn't make sense to me so interesting with, with the help ofhprotools, I'm a great piano player. Put it hat way. We all exactly, thank Godfor quanties. Exactly that's funny! So have you ever have youdone writing in Nashville? I did a couple times I went out there and,like you know, got with some songwriters and stuff, and you know it. I I mean Nashvilleis full of like greatpeople to everyone, super nice and friendly and everything, but I just Ididn't really. It was towards the end of my Cosong wriding phase, which isonly a couple years ago, and so I don't think I woul I D N T. I think it was myfault that it didn't work. You know I felt I felt out out of place. I felt like I was the guy from fromHollywood coming into Nashville, to try to make some money and I didn't it wasjust me they were totally welcoming and friendly and and great people andeverything. I think I just had like this weird thing that I just felt likeI shouldn't be there so interesting. I didn't feel like I deserved to be in aroom with some of these people. I think its really what it was and a thing thattotally honestly and seriously I was just like there are probably so manygreat songwriters that want to be sitting in here and I'm just taking upspace, and I don't think I need to go back to la where I belong and Hash itout with those guys bis. That's that's my turf, yeah right, soyeah it's and it's feels different. I've ot. I haven't really delped intoNashville, but I know a ton of people that do and it seems a very differenttype of vibe is a very factory kind of and they write so many songs. You knowI mean I can't imagine what one day how many songs come out of are written. YouKnow Turds, as you say, but some of them you know, but it's a fact, T th.That does you just reminded me that I do remember that when I did go there,it was like okay. This session is going to start at eleven o'clock and it'sgoing to end promptly at to you're going to have an hour and then at threeyou're going to go until six and then you're going to go, have dinner andthen at seven it was like these, like kind of boxes you know, and if the songwasn't done too bad, it's it's done. You know what I mean, and I didn'treally like that. You know it's like...

...it's different in Los Angeles, as youknow, it's like you go some place. You know you know s you sitting in a roomwith a bunch of people and you're writing and your ju you're trying ideas,you're, trying it you're trying it you might go, have dinner, you come back,you try it you record it, you put it it's done and it's either good or bad,but you do it until it's done. You know. Let's talk about the defector for asecond because, like I said it was a huge fan, I did you produce thatyourself, yeah yeah, I mean I had A. I had a studio inSanta Cruz and it was basically just a project studio for a personal studio. Ididn't like rent it out to people or anything. It was just for me and the myfriends and the bands that I was in in Santa Cruz and stuff and I had just quit smashmouth. This is twothousand and eight, and I wanted to make a record using some songs that were that eitherwere returned down by the singer or justsome stuff. You know ideas that were turned down or whatever and like I wantto finish. These songs realize them record them myself and put it out, puta full album out the album that I want to make not the one that interscopewanted us to make or that the lete singer, or you know people want, has tomake. I just wanted to make a record right wit with no with no rules you know, and so your buddy missr marine plays on thatalbum. He did all drums on that record for the well Tyeah. For the most part,I think he did. He did all of them, except for maybe like one song orsomething, but I think it probably took about sixmonths or something like that to do it, and I just reported it my studio andmixed it, and then I had it mastered professionally and got a little recordeal with bar nun. You remember Barnnon, I've heard of it for sure yeah I meanit's still around it's like I mean it's bands like they might be giants and nowYi Love Them. You know like some of those. That's why I know it. Yeah bazarabizarre o bands yeah. You know it was basically it's kind of like. If you go to small claims court and you winyeah, it doesn't mean you're going to get a bunch of money git's up to it'sup to you to actually enforce. You know that, and so in this case it wasactually up to me to like get in a van and go to her and like let people knowthat you know this old dude from smash mouth is, has a record out, you know, and I was like I'm not goingto- do that I'm just gonna,I'm just going to be glad that I did it and I I really am glad that I did it soyeah a it must have been cathartic just being able to just be in control andlike do it your way. You know you don't have to, and it's it's a creat record.Just I mean as far as everything you were talking about is you knowmelodically and the places that it goes it's just like it feels like you're.Finally, like I'm free, let's go everywhere, you know. Et'swell I mean Irecorded the whole alm naked. That was great. I didn't have to wear aa suit. How did you that's what I was picturing in my head? That's weird,because I can see I can see your face and you're turning red and there's also, it seems to me. Imean obviously one of them glaringly obvious, but there's songs about yourwife on this this record as well. Did you meet her before this or during this? Before yeah I mean there's a song thatcalled Gina Marie, which is her name yeah I mean a lot of the songs are haveher in mind. You know, because that's that that was a new relationship and Iwas out of smash mouth and I was like in love and we were starting to a lifeyou know and so yeah. I, the songs, wor that yeah it bring, brings a specialvibe to the record. I feel like it just feels sincere. Maybe it's because I'vemet her and she's lovely and yeah. Definitely you know t tthere wasactually now that I remember the songwriting process, for that recordwas. I was living in Santa Cruz and I lived sort of up in the mountains andmy studio was down by the beach and I would get my car and I would be drivingdown the hill and whatever. If something came into, my head, IIT determined whether I turned left orright in my car, and if I, if something was in my head and I needed to thinkabout it more, I would turn right, which meant I would go north on highway.One and just drive all the way up the coast. You know with with the ocean onmy left side and the mountains on my right, and I wouldn't go back down tothat studio until I had a very, very solid song idea and as soon as I did I',hang a Yuli and go back down there and go directly to my studio and just startrecording and Cina. Would you know she...

...would know at like you know eleveno'clock that night, you know I'd be like I'm not coming home. I gotsomething here. You Know U. Fortunately she was very supportive.You knowright Secretoto Your Hart Onno, the Suh in your song, duts, the so tialways like me, shthe s of I heard Youa, but you can't me Muc to say e Yeah Gin Mree, obviously written forher, and this is good right, yeah. In fact thatwas that was basically you know. I mean that songs has like a lot of. You knowreal things that happend you know like when I met her. We were just friends,you know for the longest time, because neither of us really knew you know. I just got out of a longrelationship with a anx wife, and so I'm like. I don't even know how to dothis anymore. You know- and so I guess I'll just be buddieswith this girl, because she likes all the same stuff ide like weird moviesand she likes the cure and the smits, and all this like kind of music that Igrew up. Listening to and and and I kept asking that question like ththis is this is kind of happening right like I do I love this girl. You knowright, don't you know, it was like basically a question to myself and soyeah. That's where that song came from Bo o, no her an trying to Reinren Tho Wel, just Ana Kamlessy and your wife sings as well yeah andshe sings. We have a band called the selectrics kind of a Nancy Sonatra. You know sgirlband thing right and we started by just doing holidaymusic. You know, yeah, I've heard les record it', it's awesome yeah, we justlove holiday, I mean quality, music, so fun and Quirky, and you can make itcreepy and it's just fun, and so we started doing that and then shewanted to do. She wanted tohave her own...

...legitimate, original album, and so so we did that and we're constantlyworking on stuff, but we're very with that project. We're just we're bothvery were perfectionist when it comes to that sort of thing, and especially ahusband and wife thing. It's it's touchy. It's tricky, you know bcause,so we both it's it's crazy. So Yeah! You can't talk to your wife, like youwould a normal singer in a session. You know I it gets tricky yeah I mean yeah.I know what you mean. It's like you know you really have to. I don't like to be careful. You know,you know when I'm speaking with someone I'm working with you know and there'sjust a few different degrees of careful that you have to be when you know when you're working withyour significant person, you know right, so I actually I'm much more proud of that electricsalbum than then defector. I think that that came out a lot more. What I wantedto do, you know to have someone else sing for one thing you know I mean Ican't stand this soun of my own voice, and so it's like I do it because Idon't know how to explain to people sometimes how what to do. You knowright, yeah, Hav, a great voice. Thank you for saying that I totally disagree. You know it's like it's just more oflike inflections, and things like that that you just can't explain to somebody.You just have to do it yourself, and so I just have to live with. What's thereyou know, but right I was working with guy named Josh Moran and we had a bandcalled the Sundrones for just Sundrones, and that was another project that Ijust totally loved. You know writing for and like writing. He was primarysongwriter at that band, but his voice was just like insane it. So good waslike my favorite voice ever and like that was one of the one of the othertimes that I really really enjoyed writing for someone else to sing stuff.You know yeah or accompany somebody. You know where I just felt like man like just just feels perfect to me. Youknow right and you kno he's still doing stuff and we still do stuff together,sometimes and stuff, but we actually got a record deawith island and it'sjust it's just kind of flopped. It just wasn't the right time in this guy'slife to to be famous, you know, Yeah T.sometimes it happens. Yeah. I feel like the game that you play is so differentthan the one I do, because I'm a hired gun. You know ninety nine point, ninepercent of the time and looking for a job, you know, whereasyou're kind of rolling the dice a lot you know and the payoff much bigger, but you also you're taking the risk.You know yeah. It's such an interesting thing to me because I started out sortof being in bands in high school and whatever, and I just like. I got so fedup just dealing with people that I was like. I just want to go. I want to getpaid. I want to play my base sing, a song. Get paid go home, you know, Imean right well mean that's that's a good way to be. You know it's like it'ssimple and yeah. You don't have to deal with it, the weird things that happened withinbands. I mean you still do yeah, but you're it's out of your hands in a way.You know what I mean: Yeah, like you star, if you just g o show up and doyour job well, O everything will be fine right, yeah, but I do kind of it'salways grasses greener. At the same time, because I do sit, you know you doso many different projects that you can be creativelyinvolved in, whereas I don't have a lot of say most of the time I just go, andyou know I'm an assembly line worker.

Essentially you know right well, I mean you know. I mean what I do now, though,like scoring and stuff like that doing things for film and TV, I pretty muchhave nothing but a bunch of bosses telling me what to do and that it sucksor that you know now, do it this way. Ned the director wants this, but thesupervisor wants this, but this guy wants that. But it's pretty difficult. You know- and I do sometimes want to just go back tobeing in a band because it sometimes it's actually easier. You know dealingwith personalities within a band than a bunch of I adult suits, arguing over art. YouKnow Itd, you know what I mean is es time yeah. I also listen to closer,which is singles from the movie kissing booth towhen you get the call to do something like that. How does that kind of godown? Do you? Do you pick from songs that you've already written, or are youalways kind of writing specifically to the phone call right? Well, that songis unique in the way that the director of kissing booth Vince, you know, he'svery musical and he's very into the S, and so any time I do things with him.We speak the same same language and that song closer was basically you know.He's like I need met a song, that's like that. Does this. That has theelements of this and the elements of that, and I just wantet all to be thesame. I want to put it all in a pot and wrageme, a song that fits this scene. That has the emotion that it needs and thisand that- and so you know with him he's very, very particular, and so I went back to the drawing board manytimes before. Closer was actually realized, an finished and in fact, theversion that you hear that that I released myself isn't thesame version. That's in the movie, because we of course didn't didn'tagree on every single thing that he was asking me to do, and so once I gave himwhat he wanted for the film I went back and unchopped it up the way I had it andwent okay. This is how I would do it and that's what I that's, how Ireleased that one so, but at the same time the song wouldn't exist it. Ifthat movie didn't hire me to do music Fort, you know right, and so, when youwrote the first year, just sending Ha Ademo or do you kind of produce it alot before you send him. The first depends. You know it's like some of thesongs in the kissing bood movies. They needed songs while they werefilming it, so they could film to it. You know get so and that's that's notnormal, nor normally you're. The last person to be added to the mix is themusician of the composer and Vince. Like I said you know he's verylike He. He wants the song playing while he's shooting. Sometimes you know,and so some of those things are like that and then theye're sort of likereconfigurated later and can figure it configurated ithink, that's it'Neubrand new word here. You go your larassist, you know you're making wordit's great. I can't rebr the question. I justwonder how finished these things are when you first send them in general, or is it just a demo andyou just a demo yeah and you cut it up and get it all right before you work onthat final production yeah I mean if they're sending me stuff. That'salready to that. You know the pictures already locked, ind R, whatever youknow, they'll send me a clip and they'll say the song: The beateverything has to land on these shots, andhise, qes and there's a lot of you know, there's a lot of markers andthere's a you know schematic to it. I guess or something you know right. Sothat's that's where it gets difficult. You know because you're doing tempochanges and you're right in the middle of a verse and all of a sudden you haveto do something to because the scene changes and they really want somethingto happen there and so you're kind of making it up a little bit as you go andI know in smash mouths like smashmouth had. That was another thing that theydid. That was, I don't know new, but it was you had so many movie placementsright off the bat yeah. Do you remember remember back then it's like it wasvery uncool to let your songs go to a commercial or a film or something likethat, especially a commercial yeah yeah. We didn't, we did not. I had E. I had still had the punk rockethic, where you know we're never going to sell out. You know right, but assoon as we did, you know like, I think I think, of the Shrek or something likethat and as soon as that check showed up in the mail I went. Oh...

Cou buy something with that money. Youknow yeah I'll start another punk band exactly, but did that help you sort of get inwith the films that you do now or like o help you repetation, because you kindof started off making music for TV and film. You know film at least.Definitely you know I still have you know a lot of the relationships fromfrom those days. You know I still talkd to a lot of the people that were behind.You know some of that success. You know with smash out the Shreks and the you know picks our movies and all thatstuff. So so what are you working on now? Let's, besides traveling so like? I do have like a littlemakeshif studio down here in this in this cold basement. Ok, it's funny because the basement has afireplace in it, but I can't use it because the People Ho in the house arelike yeah. We just bought the house and we don't. We haven't had the anythingcleaned yet so I wouldn't I wouldn't put a fire on. You might burn the housedown. So meanwhile, it's kind of cold downhere, but so I just did some music for a children's book, which is very odd.Haven't done that one, that's a new one for me Huh, but yeah, it's like they.Somebody wrote this book and they animated it and they hired me to do the music forit and it was Super Fun to do and it's it somehow. Naturally, just likehappened to where I sent it to them and they went it's perfect thanks and I was likereally there's no changes, no, nothing direct! Well. Can you put a four secondintro? You know before you know the first you know like when you see thetitle. Can you just poul like a little I'm Lik? Okay, so I did that quicklyand sent it to them a few minutes later, they're righ done thanks, wow, and sothat that was really cools. Yeah ever wow, that's awesome, yeah the bookscalled in a pickle, and I have no idea when it's coming out or I don't reallyknow too much about it. Bat, and so it's an animated thing. So the bookturned into an animated series or something it's not a series. It's just a storylike if you go on Youtube and you know you want to read a story to your kidsor you want to story red to them. You know a lot of people will take oldbooks like even books from our childhood. You Know D, even Dr souxsbooks and they've made like short little. You know not like really heavy duty,great animation but like they might show the picture and the people move alittle bit or something you know right: Heur mouth they have like some fakemouth going, guyand and they're telling the story you know about whatever it is,but they're like a lot of nighttime stories and things like that- and these are some friends of ours thatwe met when we lived in New York- and we still do you know stuff with them a Gina, and Iin fact right before that I did. I scored an entire film for the San theperson W who provucer directed this book called diary, and it was my firsthorror film, score, Whoa cool so and that's how it's called diary and it'sspelled Di e Ry dire, get it that's cool ihave to check that out.That's that's like a whole other world right there, because thenit's likesound effects and folimost. You know right. It's it's a lot of fun. I Ting. I recommend just doing it for fun. Ifyou want yeah ha ha so do you enjoy the film scoring thing more than writingpop songs or the all just goes hand in hand totally. I mean at this point yeahI like. I would rather score film or TV or Doqes for netflix movies, orwhatever comes my way. That sounds fun that will have a picture to it. Youknow I it's just so much more fulfilling to me right. I mean, becauseI mean you've you've already. If you've already done the other thing, you know,you've had song on the radio or you've been in bands, and you know you know that it's sort oflike it comes and goes, and I don't know I just I like I likehearing music, that I've done put to picture. It's just amazing to me. Well Man.Thank you. So much for hang itg out you're one of my favorite songwriters.Oh Man E, really pleasure. You know it's a pleasure to know you. We haven'tknown each other that long, but we did start a song and we should try to getback to that. I was listening to that the other day. That's a that song. Okay, tthere must be there'sthis thing called. I don't know like Ingram or something like that. Everytime I go to do the dishes, a certain...

...song will come into my head right, butevery time I do a certain element of doing those dishes. Happy and plaincomes into my mind every time oevery single time. So I think what that is islike. I was doing the dishes at my house. While we were working on thatSong- and I must have been Holm in that song or something because every time Ido something with the it's the way I put my silverweare in like some of them-I put up and some of them I put down as a guitar player, you know never putyour knives facing straight up. You know, have your finger up and so forsome reason the precourse always comes into my head and I just like, then thiswhole song comes and I'm like and we gotto get it done and marketedas dishwashing song. It's a catchy number, my friend well cool. Well thanks, Yo Gev forstaying up late and hang it out and and thanks for having me, you know givingof your knowledge. You know indoreally appreciate it. Yeah, thanks for havingme Dude, always Goin, to talk to you and and Jus good to actually see yourface. We haven't seen each other in a while. I know I know we'll come home.Let's well, don't come home, it's a mess over here, Weo few months,whenthis vaccine kicks in and who knows? What's going to happen? You know yeahemaybe, I'll, cu Atlanta, that be great. You should yeah, and on that you knowevery. I hope everyone stays well and healthy and safe and happy holidays. heall cool youtue men. Well, that was awesome and I thought itwas really interesting. When we talking about the how many songs you got tawrite to get a good song, there's a a great songwriter and speaker namedRalph Murphy and he had broken down songwriting to a science, and I foundone of his lectures on Youtube and then eventually saw him speak at asongriding convention before he passed away in two thousand and nineteen andhe had studied the numbers so much that he kept track of what tempos werecurrently used on, hit songs and what subject matter and like what keys that they were in and and it was really fascinating. But thething that stuck with me, the most was when he talked about how many songs hewould write in a year and he called it riding through the ordinary to get tothe good, and he said he would write a hundred songs a year. Hed Demo aboutforty he'd, get six cuts and have a hit every third year. So I try to use that as a temptplat oneyear and it just it proved to be pretty impossible. Unless you know I wasn't afulltime working, you know songwriter, but it ends up being a lot of time anda lot of songs. It's just interesting. It's really hard to look in the mirror.Sometimes and songwriting is one of those things that,if you're, if you're going to be good at it and you're going to have successat it, you really got to take a hard look at at yourself and what you'reputting out and not be so emotionally attached to everything, because most ofthe stuff that you're going to write is not going to be great. And if youaccept that and keep writing, then you'll. You know thegreat ones will rise to the top. Mosewright was a guitar manufacturerbased in Bakersfield California, from the s all the way up to the S, and oneof their more famous models was designed for the band. The ventures whohad a hit called walk, don't run, although I believe that song wasrecorded on offender jazz master and we talked about flat, wound, stringsversus roundwound, strings and guitar strings are basically made by wrappingmaterial around an inner core of wire and round wound. Guitar strings use around external wire to wrap around the inner wire core, which is more commonand has a brighter sound and flat wound guitar strings which use a flat tapelike wire. They feel completely smooth to the touch and have a little bitdarker sound a base. Six is a six string base, that's tuned an octavebelow a Guihar, and I had never seen one before going over to Greag's studio,and then I played one for the first time on the demo of the song that we'reworking on called a happy and plain that he mentioned and they're supercool. It was really fun, so I thought, since it's getting close to theholidays, I would just play us out with a holiday selection from gregs band,the electrics, because we talked about him and his wife Doing Christmas music.So here is some of that Christmas music. So I hope you enjoy it and I hope youhad a great time...

Ae. Timewow, you've made it to the end,I'm hoping it's because you completely enjoyed yourself and are now filledwith knowledge and inspiration to move forward with your dreams. If that isthe case, and you would like to Sta nnformed of new episodes live eventsand General News, please go to dive Bar Rock starcom and sign up for themallinist. I you have any questions, comments, corrections or complaintsabout anything you hear on the show. Please email me at fan, mail and diveBar Rock Starcom, and you may even end up on the show we ave the dive bar rockstar podcast with all of our hearts. Thank you for listening and remember.It's all about dreams.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (31)