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The Dive Bar Rock Star Podcast
The Dive Bar Rock Star Podcast

Episode 1 · 1 year ago

Chad Wright- "The Secret" to his Success (Bruce Hornsby and the Noisemakers, The Jacksons, Michael Bolton)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Drummer Chad Wright talks about his experiences playing with Bruce Hornsby and the Noisemakers, The Jacksons, Tina Marie, Rick James, The High School Musical Tour and many other artists. He reminisces about growing up in Atlanta with his twin brother, Chay, and their journey to Berklee College of Music in Boston, MA. Chad opens up about pivotal moments in his career and how he stays on top through hard work and practice.

Live with Bruce Hornsby

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zEHF2iOnfXs

Bruce Hornsby: Absolute Zero

https://open.spotify.com/album/5Zks2SZNQAw4NYlUhVEE85?si=BVMjpX_NSUSpTE8NkJqA1A

The temple studio is available for all of your recording, mixing and mastering needs, whether it's on location or via Internet file exchange. Located in the San Fernando Valley, the Temple Has Forty Physical Inputs for live ensemble tracking and a production team with over thirty years of experience. To Book Time, call to one hundred and three, eight four zero, one seven seven zero for email. Tea Chad T at mecom. Welcome to the dive Bar Rockstar podcast, the show exploring the lives of professional musicians of all types, touring musicians, recording artist, songwriters, engineer's bar bands, wedding bands and anyone making their living in the music industry. Whether you've dreamed of being a professional or you already are one, this is the podcast for you. I'm your host, Eric Baines, and I hope that you not only find some entertainment here, but also some helpful tips, trade secrets and ideas that will help you achieve your dreams. Well, it's all over. There's no music business anymore. All your dreams of being a musician are are no in void. At this point, we can't work. It's kind of unbelievable. I never thought that I would see this in my lifetime, but I think that we're going to get through this. I don't think it's all negative. I'm kind of half joking. It's weird. Never it doesn't seem real, but I think we're going to get through this. I think the human beings need music and it's part of human nature. So once everything calms down in this virus gets under control, we're going to go right back and maybe it'll even be better because people are going to have this time off from live music. They've all missed their favorite bands or family favorite musicians. So I think, and ironically, it's given me the time. Is it ironic? I don't know. I'll do the math on the irony. I don't I think people get that wrong. But it's interesting that it's given me the time to start a podcast, something I've always wanted to do, and have some of my my great friends and great musicians on here to talk about what they do for a living and hopefully you guys can get something out of our conversations. In our discussions, which means me to you today, one of my best friends of all time, Mr Chad right. He's an awesome drummer he's going to be our guest. He's currently in the member of Bruce Hornsby's band, the noisemakers, as well as the drummer for the Jacksons. He's also played with Michael Bolton, Chaka conly written, our kickomont Suey Tina, Marie Rick, James, Gladys night, Corbin blue, Lucas Gray build, the temptations, Eric Ben at. The list goes on and on and on. He's also played on almost every one of my records. He's an amazing drummer and an awesome guy. So, without further ADO, please welcome Chad right star. We've known each other for almost twenty years now. Yeah, hundreds of gigs? Yeah, you know, I love hundreds of countries. Probably not, but yeah, well, but maybe I don't know a lot of them. We probably thirty either. Yeah, fifty, somewhere in the ring exactly. So I wanted to talk about your story kind of from the beginning, and I know quite a bit about it because we're such good friends. But you started in Atlanta, I did, born and raised for the most part. Yeah, man, and and Atlanta is funny, exciting, exciting time to have grown up there, because obviously a lot of great musicians came out of Atlanta and and and a few good bands, man SOS band, Atlanta, rhythm sex, right, right, thirty eight special. That's cool. And Cameo wound up being based there. Cameos actually out of New York. That's where they started in front, but they moved to Atlanta for the I guess I'm paraphrasing from an interview from Larry Blackman, but the possibilities of what Atlanta was going to become. Right actually had a great hand in that. I don't know if they realize that or not, but he did have a great handed. And the time New York was not in good shape. No, what Atlanta probably look really good. And so did you play music in high school? Yeah, man, I mean I ween he just starts sink as as long as I can remember. So it started probably like you or anybody else, banging a pots and pans. Probably Right. I mean it's true, but it's like, for I got my first toy drum set and so it was always drums for the most part. I mean the first the first instrument I ever took lessons on, not by choice, was piano. Hmm, I remember my grandmother moving their old antique piano and to our house and telling my mom...

...and dad they will play piano. I think that's good. That's a good thing for kids it. Yeah, you know, everyone should at least know something about music exactly if you're going to be an accountant eventually. Well, you know what, it was very true. Yeah, and piano also percussive, percussing. So there was definitely a lot of banging, as my grandmother would call it, hanging. She had no idea what was to come. You want to just wait, they'll be more banging. Yeah, yeah, wait, do you see my next instrument? Exactly. And now for my next trick. And you are also in marching band. No Ze, marching band. Yeah, we have that in comment because I was we have had income and I actually taught drumline at my high school for another nine years after I graduated as the drum instructor. But you know, coincidentally, the first instrument I ever played and marching band was not drums, it was trumpet Um me to laugh. See, strange. That's why it's this three of us in this relationship. Exactly. That'll be explained where. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, and and actually a middle school and Elementary School, I started playing trumpet and then my sixth grade year, my aunt, my mom's youngest sister, was in high school and she talked their band director and to letting my brother and I be in their marching band. It's like little mascot and so we can play funny. So here I was. It was great exercise because there wasn't too much reading involved. There was reading involved for the most part. This band did their arrangements from ears. So and then I trained my ear really well, right, playing in that marching band. Yeah, and my dad made a deal with me. Is Like I'll let you play in drumline, but you got to play trumpet and like concert band, concert Bain and phonic right. So I could play drums and jazz man. I could play drums and marching band, but I had to keep up the trumpet and the other yeah, I actually played. Well, I switched a base eventually, but I but I did drumline in the march man that I played trumpets through sophomore year in the orchestra. So and it would be like every day. But when never really needed horns and turned into a symphony, than I'd be one of the guys. Yeah, it switched to any other brass while you were in there. Well, no, my brother played saxophone for about eight seconds and so when he got it though, I was like Oh, that's cool. So I grabbed it immediately and this flew through his book, you know, and like you know, I wasn't any good at it, but for a second it was around. I remember I we had a talent show at at school called pops festival and high school, and somebody was doing Kokomo by the beach boys, and so I was like, Oh, play the sex solo, and I've played it with the audition and they're like Um, we love the act, maybe not so much the SAS so like all right, I'll go back to base. Yeah, yeah, so I didn't really pursue it. And you mentioned that you have a brother, idea. He looks just like me. He's were twins exactly like I'm gonna he sex toy. HAH, and now he's a guitar player. So his sax playing went as well as mind did. It sounds like. I don't know, but you ever got to say the Guitar Player, and we've, the three of us have done tons of gigs together as well kid, and so that's that's cool that you've had the whole journey is kind of been with him, with the exception of you moving to La and him staying in Boston. But you've not he not done this alone. It's kind of right where you always playing together, or I think playing together was HAP hazard and in other words, like and obviously in middle school. In high school we had a band together, hmm and and then the bands and whatever in high school. And when we got to well, we went to first college, we played in all the ensembles together. When we got to Berkeley you could see US split because he was film scoring Major. Wrong, I'm sorry, I'm wrong. He was business management major. He started he wanted to go into film score and then he decided, you wanted to go into the business side. God. But that being said, he was always produced engineer and so his focus was always in production engineering right of some sort. In writing. And Mine at Berkeley, even though I started out at as an mpne major, I...

...switched to professional music. So yeah, so I Berkeley we didn't really play a lot together, which is funny actually, because that's the first time I saw both of you guys and it just seemed like every recital I went was both of you in the band. Wow, so to my from my perspective, I was like, oh, those are the twins again. I was probably probably one year, one year. Yeah, eighteen. I was only there for a year, like Cason in there that way. Yet that would be the year. Yeah. And so where did you always have your sights on? Berkeley or yeah, yeah, yeah, the conversation my senior year in high school was I'm gonna go to Berkeley and my mom and dad were there and they had there was a financial guy that came to the house and with the Book of all the colleges and you know, this is tuition for this college, is it's tuition for that college, and I specifically he'll deny it, but I specifically remember my dad saying no fucking way. And that was yeah, yeah, you know, because you're all kind of blown away, like this is Ivy League, this is harbor level, right, we didn't even think about it until that moment. But do you get scholarships and stuff? Or yeah, I got a partial scholarship, yeah, which helped. So do you think it would was worth it the money? Yeah, I get into a conversations a lot with the drummers I play currently, and it's just about because he's kind of a finance guy on the side to and nowadays you're going to come out of Berkeley with a hundred and twenty grands. Where the where? The death? Still Okay, I'm still pay my scolish, my student loans off. Wow, yeah, wow, that's yes, that's incredibly pretty sad. So he's always like, don't do it, but I'm always like, I get where you're coming from, but for one, education is important and this is a business where you can easily just be like, Oh, I played pretty good guitar and then you can make a living and and you can do it. But the guys that are at the top, most of them are educated at this point. Yes, and I look at it like this. To it, as I tell you, the evil even when Berkeley calls me to get to donate money every year, and I'm sure call you right yeah, and that that kid on the other line is going, hey, man, am I going to be able to live right now? I've been doing this. It's cool for me to assure them. Yes, me, obviously, you do what we did in anybody else out here who's had any sort of success. You work hard. But to me, the networking at Berkeley, yeah, as in any college, Hmm, is what it's all about at the end of the day. That's what, to me, college is all about. The degree is there, which I did not get right. It's not like you're not going to get great musical experiences there too, exactly, and intense and because that's just it. Exactly. Yeah, with those experiences come networking. If you make your if you make an impact somewhere in a zone there, that network will take you through the rest of your career. And so many guys, obviously I'm jumping ahead, at the high school musical bed and right, that was hmm, that was five out of six guys who all went to Berkeley at the exact same time, right. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, that's what I say too, is in networking thing. Or if you look at the guys on the voice, that band, most of those guys went to school. They would we were all there together, right, and those those friendships, in those connections and stuff the last a lifetime. Yeah, if you let him. Yeah, and you come to town with already a network of people that you can kind of plug into, like I went I can't remember the guys name that was ahead of the Berkeley La when I got here, but you know, I went right to you, Gordon. Yeah, Peter Green exactly. I knew it was like a famous guy's name, but not that Peter Gordon Anyway. But yeah, so, Oh, Peter and Gordon is the name of a band from the S. I was like, oh, that's not anyway. So, anyways, it's cool to be able to come here and plug into those people. And when you get here too, there's the Miami University guys, there's, you know, there's the Berkeley guys, there's there's the north Texas guys and, like you know, there's a little pockets of people that you can kind of plug right into. So and in the end of the day, I only went there for three semesters. So my debt was paid off a long time ago. But for yeah, but a lot of people don't graduate now. But even just being there and being able to network and being able to have a number by your name, ninety three, you know, is when I when I got out of there. You know, it matters and it's probably worth some of the money and, like you know, work hard gets scholarships I don't know, get your grades. That's the whole deal. But I'm always this like education, knowledge is power, you know what I mean? Like I'm such an old school guy about that. And and I also always say like the better you are, the more gigs you can have, the more skills you have, the more gigs you...

...can take. Exactly. And you know, knowing how to read and stuff like that, and act. You know, don't really, don't underestimate the reading is, I tell young folk. Right, yeah, exactly, yeah, totally. So after that you stayed in Boston for a while. I stayed in Boston for a while. I got my last semester there, no second to last semester. Another Great Bass Player, Damon Ebner, who he and I friended each other throughout school. He came to me one day and he says, Hey, there's just band and Boston, this cover band. They're looking forward bass and drum replacement. The old guys were leaving and you want to audition with me? And it was funny because, and we can get into this later about metaphysics, at the time I didn't know anything about better physics. I just remember like maybe a day or so before seeing him, I said to myself, I need to rock Gig, because my playing really good, really solid, and I was listening to a lot of you know, pop rb and kind of contemporary jazz. But I realized that I needed an edge and I wasn't going to get it and I needed to get the edge on the spot, like, you know, on the job training, right. Yeah, and I knew it would come from rock. HMM. And so I just went this is a perfect opportunity. Whether I get the GIG or not, the least I can do is learn the music, try and learn it exactly the way the guy played it on the record and right and go from there. Right. So we go in and we we audition and wanted to team room. Team rooms. Those of you who are familiar with one hundred and fifty Massa, I know the tea room. Last lots of hours in there. Yes, and so we start playing a stuff in it and it felt good. The first thing the producer said after we play was yeah, okay, that sounds good and silent, and then he's a man, I noticed you got this thing. He's like your snare is just just back behind and it was funny because it was something I was working on. It was something that I picked up from John Bonham, the English right, as his snown right, sure, just behind. I'm not doing that now, although I've been working on getting that back. But so he picked up on that and then we played another song and as we're playing I dropped the stick in my right hand. So I just started playing the pattern with kicking snare and I was playing quarters with my high hat foot. Uh Huh, and he stopped. He since yeah, that's it right there. Okay, cool. Wow. So we got the GIG and and then I stayed with Bark for till it was ninety for wow, it was fall of ninety four and I said that wasn't cat tuned. Cat Tunes right, Morrison, cap tune right, which would morph into and more. I mean we had it do personality the band Morse. So cat tuns was the cover band and Morse was the original band. Oh cool, so it was our alter eagles. Are you? Yeah, and obviously if you came to we would do just more shows where we just play the original stuff and then you know, obviously the originals will get morphed into a cat tune set right. And the band was interesting about this band. This band was one of the most popular cover bands in New England. Right. So people still tell you this. Lines were wrapped around whatever building we were playing. Wow, for people trying to get in to see the band. Right. It was just it was a fun and it was a fun and exciting band. I can't say that I contributed it at because that started, I think, fifteen years before Damon and I have gotten the bead. So it was kind of a big deal to get the GIG that I was because you knew about them. Yeah, well, I didn't know anything. I didn't know what the fuck a cat tunes was. The way they were standing in those lines. Oh Man, the wait Damon presented. It was hey man, how would you like to make? This is no lie. How would you like to make? Seventy five bucks a GIG, four, five nights a week. Wow, and a cover bit. HMM. And I went yeah, the driver like seventy five bucks. And so so once we got the GIG markets talking to us about money and all I zoned in on was seventy five bucks a GIG.

That that's pretty good, right, and in zone on the part where he said and then after two weeks I give you a raise. I double it oh wow. And after that two weeks I double that. Well, so see, you're making bank. So by the time the winter of ninety five comes around, I'm bringing in maybe one hundred and fifty, two hundred a Gig. Wow, by the time that I left the GIG in two thousand. HMM. I mean, I know I was easily you know. I know for fact I was making three hundred and seventy five cheese before hundred a GIG. That's pretty good for a cover band. Pretty pretty that's a great and and we had crewe rights exactly, what a tech and stuff. Yeah, that's that's amazing. Wow. So did YOU ENJOY BOSTON? I mean, you moved, obviously, so I enjoyed the the experiences of Boston and I didn't too much care for the city. It's funny because I still don't care much for the city and in terms of terrain, in terms of weather right being. That I will always carry with me are the experiences the people that were there in my life, from the school to my first wife, to mark and the guys in the band to right friends that I meant along the way. There's a lot of great music there and the great music. Yeah, it felt like compared to if you were in New York or something, for what it's going to cost way more. At the time city still not the safest place in the world. Boston was like the safer, nicer, little more laidback places, a college town. People are there to learn, you know. It's a totally different vibe than pressure. Is a little less, you know, than a town like la or New York, where it's like Nah, now you're competing with Dave Weckel, you know, Boston you're like, I know everyone's are sort of the figure it out and help each other and there's like a community there that pigs. It feels like that. That's cool. So but eventually decided you had to go. Yeah, man, the weather is a thing. Man, the you know that the weather was a very big factor. So Morris, the band, was picking up momentum. We put out a CD and it got some attention from some rucket labels nice, and I thought, okay, this is cool, this is like my kinny air and off effect part of a band and then this gets me to the next level and then I can go off and I can do my thing right from there. Right, and we never really pursued the next level. HMM. For whatever reason, I don't know. I've never really asked Bark. We were big fish and a little pawn, and I sometimes we're all comfortable with that. But I got to a point where we were playing the same places every night and right and I'm seeing the same faces, which is cool. MMM, don't get me room, very appreciative of the situation. So I was sure, and you're in a pretty big pond. Yeah, you're a big fish in a pretty good size pob where you can make a living still exactly, you know, he's flush. Are On these coasts. You can go anywhere, exactly, you know. And so with that the band we were exploring musically a little bit more. We kind of broadening things out a little bit. But I had realized one night I gotta, I gotta go to the next thing. And it could have been, you know, seeing my friends on TV playing with whoever or, you know, talking to him, and they got this great tour, blah, blah, blah. And so I knew I was I'm like and I had gotten to the point I was satisfied with where my plane was because at that point, because I always do a three month mark, Ye, I'm always trying to get better. There's been sometimes where I haven't, and I've addressed that. But but this was one where I wanted to. I knew I got the edge right, you know. Now I'm ready to go. Got You and and I was the thing about La to you, like I didn't want to come out here without having the edge. HMM. So, and why LA AND NOT NEW YORK? I'm another concrete jungle. I'm just a y the weather. I'm not a fan of snow, all right, I've lived in snow long enough. Even before Boston as a kid, we lived in Chicago for like three years. MMM, I'd see, you know my Gosh, Oh, yeah, forget it. Yeah, I know. I'm originally from Denver. Yeah, I've, I've just I was on my friends podcast from Denver last week, as you know, interviewing or whatever as a guest, and I said the same thing. I'm like, I just had to get out. I was tired of the weather sort of dictating your...

...life, like when it's a blizzard in the clubs don't open, then you can't work. You know that never happens here. No, so if I never see snow again, I'm totally fine. I'm but I never even thought about it until I got to Berkeley and met people that they're big dream was going to La and I was like, I don't even know what that is because I my I was originally from New York. I was born in Poughkeepsie and my whole families there. So grown up as a kid in Denver, I was my whole goal was just get to get back to New York, you know, got to go where the people are and whatever. But but yeah, then I actually just took a well, I was then I went back to Denver, aft to Berkeley and work there for almost ten years. and La's not that big of a different sort of you know. That's some of the towns in Denver are the pieces of town and Denver are named the same stuff and like the streets, and so coming out here and then just the weather was like Oh man, I gotta be here. Yeah, this this is instantly I was like this this is a man. Yeah, my first nine months here it never rained once. It was always a gorgeous day every now just thinking like yeah, I know, I remember going on a beach unlike December second and I like man, everyone at home is f reason right now. And I'm looking at dolphins. It's this is what I want exactly. Yeah, and I also remember like going through the hills, you know, because I'm from Colorado, so mountains. So I look at some of these driveways that are steep and sound like man, how they do that in the winner? Oh wait a second, there is no winners right, like this is amazing. But yeah, but not only that, though, it's like it's the same type of thing. It's Boston or New York. you go out any night of the week and yeah, just get your ass kicked. This is so many great players and they were playing the music I liked. And this, this place, is kind of a I always wanted to be a road guy. I liked studio stuff, but I just wasn't a more about travel and hotels and live audiences and and La is more of like the players are out all the time, when they're in, when they're home, their plan, so you can go right up to him and get gigs. You know. I mean are like offer your services, whereas other towns like Nashville, you go out and it's more like songwriters everywhere and stuff. So you have to sort of and the and they tour a lot. So the touring guys aren't necessarily playing out at home all the time. They're not always home. You know, not impossible, obviously, but in la it was just more like this is where you go to get a road Gig, you know right. That's exactly I was at Berkeley. I was torn between studio and live because, you know, and and particularly well, Steve Gan is the reason why I played drums anyway. At five or six years old is when I discovered Steve Gad and had processed yet what he did as far as was it a road thing or was it a studio thing? I just heard him and when I got to get that. But when I got into middle school and started getting Martin Drummer and started, you know, really listening intently to records, I was always had in my mind that I would be in like a pop band. Yeah, Duran, Duran, but then I would be the studio guy, you know. So I would be like bikes, basically a Jeff Picaro or but those were my heroes in middle school, in high school, like Jeff Picaro, Jr Robinson, all right, Larry London, MMM, guys, and the reason why they were my heroes at that point was I started to realize they were playing on so many records and they were so the records would be vastly different. So it could be an rb record, could be a country record, right, your rock Rugor could be what? Right, and these cats, which just chameleons. Yeah, my heard all those and and that's when I went, okay, maybe I want to be the studio guy, and that's when I started playing everything. Right then when I got the Berkeley and I've realized how much I enjoyed playing out. Yeah, yeah, and I wouldn't you know what, maybe maybe this thing, this touring thing, is a thing. And then the drum machine was so prevalent when we were coming up right, right, that I did see a decline in session stuff exactly, without even being a part of it, just as a young person going uh, yeah, yeah, the world's changing. Yeah, so that's where, luckily, most bands at the time, even though you have the drum machine the record, you still gotta still gotta get you know, yeah, that's right. But Dad had the best, you know, players in the world, even though it's a you know, half the music at the time she was putting out as all sequence. Yeah, but like Omar Hawkey is playing it, you knowmorrow, or or Jonathan Moffitt or Tony Thompson. Yeah, and those were like three...

...of my favorite guys. Here again, these were guys that were these were guys that were heroes of mine, with Jr and for Carro and Larry London and Mike Beard, because I knew of them playing one style of music and then I find out Omar Kim is played on less dance, yeah, or he's playing on money for nothing, all right, yeah, or you know, that is my fitt playing on open your heart. So yeah, well, I think that's why we hit it off, because that's that's the other thing to like bass and drums, to me and my head as a producer, as a player, it's like if I I got a drummer, yeah, there's nothing to hold, there's nothing I can do, and street a bass player and I'm a frustrated drummer. So it's like. But it's also that diversity, because it's funny that you said a big pop band like Durand around, of all the pop bands you could have picked. I'm huge drand round fan, you know, and like not everybody is, and you can you can nip pick it and be like, Oh, these guys are sort of hacks and this is goofy music. But if you really dig in, like they're playing their asses on, yeah, it's pretty incredible. and John Taylor one of the most underrated bass players of all time. I agree, and I think right to tailor was one of the most underrated dums of all time. And Yeah, and what was appealing was those guys had so many different influences and they figured out a way to to fuse them together in a great formula. And a lot of bands came from where they're from. That most Sheffield scene. HMM, in the UK produce so many great things. But right then, what other entity could confuse a Bowie and a Shik? Yeah, and you know, velvet, underground, like all these different things into one right. Yeah. And the other thing is I think that that's sort of a lost like when I was coming up, and you're going to like the whole point was to be as diverse a musician as you could, but now it's like I don't see that happening as much and kids like, Oh, this is what I do, I'm part of this scene. Or is that impressed upon? And the way I say to young people if I'm giving a lesson or if I'm talking to him. Is the one thing that I emphasize. When I was at Valdos to state and decide to really go to Berkeley, was okay, I don't want to starve right as a musician exactly. I don't want to be the starving musician everyone talks about. So now that I've decided drums will be my bread and butter, what style of music will be my bread and butter with drums? And that's when I went okay, well, I'll definitely do the pop rock thing for sure, and and I love playing jazz. But I at that point in one nineteen eighty, nineteen ninety, it was pretty apparent that jazz musicians weren't making what the return to forever guys were. I mean right. It's different than because, for sure Korea had electric band or Herbie hancocky come out with rockets. Are you crossed over? But they were, they were only doing them, which was they weren't getting stuck at like Miles Davis. They weren't because they came from miles school right. They weren't staying in one bag. They were just going to explore and and basically like if you want to come for the ride, come for the ride, right. But for me it was I'm going to make money at this. Yeah, yeah, yeah, I'm you know, as a musician, I'm probably not going to get super rich, right, I'm definitely not going to be starving. Yeah. Yeah, and that's one thing I realized when I got to La to I was looking around like man, these these musicians that do what I do in Denver have houses and cars and, you know, nice gear and like they have lives and families they're actually supporting. Like it's a living out here. Yeah, whereas Denver, I mean if I made twenty grand a year, I was, I was, I was, yeah, comfortable as I could be. You know, obviously the cost of livings less, but when I moved down here it wasn't as bad as is now. I mean I've lived our two thousand so back twenty years ago and it wasn't as bad. I had a apartment in Denver for like nine hundred and seventy five bucks a month to bedroom to bath. I found a place in Passadna fore hundred and twenty five, like two bedrooms, one bath. But but you know, it wasn't as bad it was. So it was totally doable and guys had houses and and so I was like yeah, I gotta, I gotta get here. And it doesn't snow, man, forget it right, beaches and mountains a bonus. I know. Crazy. And then what was your first Gig when I came out here? MMM, oh, man, the first GIG was I sucked for Ron Minogue my second or third week in La at the baked potato on sunset,...

...thank doing the house band jam session for Ja Gorg J Gores running it. Oh Wow, that's crazy, and I and you know, and that was the thing was Jayres, a awesome guitar slayer to town and Ben. He does a lot of smooth jazz. Now he does a lot of smooth jazz and was with Menda bar for long indabe for a long time. Now he's with Warren Hill, or hill. Yeah, he did. He'll your stuff, all right. Yeah, Hilary time recommended him for Lauren Hill, the Miss Lauren he'll, which in which you have to address her ass or yeah, if you're allowed to address you were allowed to address it. That's a whole another anyway. So that was my first Gig. Ban. Well, and and then my second GIG was I answered in an in the paper. No, musicians contact, right, yes, I signed up for that. Yeah, they which, by the time we got here, was an online thing. That's right. And then you, that's right, I did the same thing. In fact, that's how I met Bobby Williams, is zone will get to in a minute, is through musicians contact, ha ha. And Bobby was a he played at this bar and Monro via called the brass element and we eventually ended up playing their tons and he's passed away now, which is a drag, but that was quite a fun gig. That was another another eye opening thing for being in turned playing interesting. Oh yeah, that Gig, that that GIG and being introduced to bobby and the few of us and then that world that opened up. That was a very that was another pivotal moment, wow, for me. And I played because I played music that I known about but never played, never had the opportunity to play. Yeah, and Bobby was like so loose about anything, like you kind of knew it, he's going to play it. Yeah, and he didn't care. Just be musical. Yeah, you know. So that made it pretty fun because there was no, no pressure, no consequences, you know. And and if it was a mess, then we'll do it tomorrow and it'll be better. You know, right here, go home and listen to any watch don't because he's not gonna Right. Just as wrong as he did night before. But it was a lot of fun, in fact, like them. You know, it's called the dive Bar Rockstar podcast, which is a song and record that I put out that you played most of except for that song, which is a drag, but that's my favorite song on the record. Oh Man, well, bury, it's because you're humble. Yeah, well, I'm at I call it like I see it. But when I think about that song and what I wrote about that song, it was kind of when I played the brass elephant, it was pretty much any time I was home. It was always my weekend gig. If I was home and I wanted to play, I could play so and I just did. Bobby was just heat. Everyone knew him there. He was just so in the he brings in me, this this new kid and talked me up and you know, I was kind of dive bar rocks are there, you know, in that place I was pretty popular and famous. You know, and at the time I was playing with kick them ont suey and I'd come back from Russia. I've been Russia for a month or whatever, and all these crazy things that, you know, people around me. It was pretty impressive, like most of people in that bar had never been to Russia, you know. Yeah, so it was a it was home, you know, it really homey feeling and and we could play whatever we wanted and it was like, okay, take a solo and do it if you want to do and yeah, I was. I'm glad that that was that was the case because, you know, I was I was just like, bobby, you got you gotta Call Chad. Yeah, he's gonna be perfect. It's life too. But that's the other that kind of goes back to what I was saying too, about the versatility. Is that that's what I just love playing about. Love about your playing is that I'm tying the same way and we can go anywhere we want and it's just so freeing. You know, and you listen, you know, and and so I just feel like we're a machine and we're always kind of moving together and we have the same instincts because we listen to the same music obviously and have the same influences drum wise, but that's great. So then we met like probably probably two thousand and one, I would I would guess. You know, yeah, yeah, I remember. I was go I went to cafe corty out which is also has passed away and no longer they're which is a bummer. It was a awesome club in the valley here that was run by a guy who really loved music, which is rare, very rare, and anyways it's gone. But I went in there and to see a band called hit squad. I'm pretty sure it was because Neariko, I had met your near now wife, Neariko, who's phenomenal keyboard players, singer. I like to call her the octopus because she can play like three string lines at once and the piano part and saying all that the same time, and she's really great. Hopefully she'll be on the show eventually as well. And then I saw you play. I'm...

...like, Oh my God, that's the guy that has the twin brother from Berkeley, because we didn't know each other at Berkeley. Right. So really we've known each other homes thirty years. Probably dead, but we didn't know each other then and it was just like, oh, wow, cool, and then I can't remember the Bass player. Last tonight show there were Derrek Murdock. Yes, he was playing the Gig at the time, I'm pretty sure. And then he knows, I never, I never played with Derek and hit squad at all. Actually, Oh, it was. So it was John Haynes, okay, who plays Bass for Rolls Royce Guy, because, well, I got a cassette, but I knew of there was he in it before you got there. Maybe he done it before, because I got a set tape that. I was pretty that when Daryl Crooks was running the band. Yeah, Phenomenal Guitar Player. This shows going to turn into a lot of names that people may or may not sure. Yeah, I think we got to be Carel shot, but Daryl krook's amazing guitar player. Funky did and he gave me a cassette tape and I'm pretty sure it was Derek on it. It was Derek on it and probably Daniel be a Rano was playing drums. Got You got something? That's right, that I got. Yeah, it was Daniel, right, right, right, right, right. So, anyway, I saw you, I met you and eventually I'm in the band because I had met Darryl. Actually, that's how it all worked out, because the first place I came was Steve's, which is also no longer than one of there, and I went to see Derek Edmondson gets on sacks. Yeah, and it's a Stevie's. He was hosting the Jam. So that's where I met Darrell and you know, Derek gought me right up because the guy from Denver had known Derek. You know, Blah, blah, blah. When you get here it's like whatever you can do, whoever. You know, you just go for it, you know, especially if you if you really want to make a living and survive, because I didn't. I didn't work a day job or anything. I had a I came out here with my then wife, hmm, and she got a job. So you know as so I allowed me a little more time to get going. By the end of the day, man, I had to pay my rent. So you know, I'm going to do whatever I can do. Yeah, but anyway, I'd met Daryl at Stevie's and then he's like, oh, come see my band. Yeah, well, it was phenomenal, as it always was, fun Gig and and then I feel like the first time we actually play together was out of hit squad rehearsal. Yeah, and it was like a man, yeah, and and I said Oh mit, and Urigo said, Oh man, yeah, yeah, yeah, so the four of us did a lot of stuff. Comes to beginning. Yeah, yeah, for sure. It was Super Fun, and that led to Olly Woodson, that's right, which was my first Japan tour. Yeah, and that was really fun. I mean it was an experience for sure. Wily cow and, you know, another guy passed away, but that taught me a lot, for sure, about music and touring. I mean again, first time to Japan. Oh my gosh, that was so much fun. It was funny. Still remember that the last night drinking beer and then going to your f you know. Plus, we got like kidnapped in Tokyo. That's right. No, Non Tokyo, N Glory and go ahead, no, go. Yeah, but it was so crazy because we came out of the hotel and there was a couple of or was it one guy? It was one guy, was like one Japanese guy, yes, came up and he's like, you guys are with ally Woodson, and then like, honestly, at that time I didn't I didn't realize all these popularity. I guess, like I knew he was part of the temptations, but it was like the later part of the temptation. Shoot, you know, wasn't really what I would listen to right at the end. I wasn't aware of it, you know what I mean. So to go to Japan and him just being like huge in a lot of ways and this guy just saying, oh well, let's go to dinner tonight, and I'm like okay, and we show up after it and was like all, he's not going to go, but we'll go. So it was the three of us. It was Stevens was meet you did Marika? Did Art go? I don't think our, when I think our are at least smart. Yeah, exactly. I thought we were going around a corner. Yeah, and we get in this car and it's like James Brown everywhere and all this armvy stuff and lights and stuff, and we just start driving and it's like an hour and a half later we're in the middle of rice. No, we're and like we're all about to get killed an other Japanese serial killers. I don't know, I've never been here before, but holy go but then they do then we get out and this is like this House that had been converted to a restaurant and they're just food, free food everywhere, and this cool bar with all these records and like old soul records, and turned out to be really neat, but I really thought we were going to die. So did I was like this is gonna suck. How you'RE gonna explain this? Yeah, wow, I hope someone knows. So he explained. Maybe this is how we all get famous. It's funny. The only thing that was in my mind to relax be door that was this is Japan. They don't really kill people here. It's too nice. Right, right, right, right. Yeah, we find out later it's yeah, well, in any other police dark sides,...

...yeah, for sure, for sure. Yeah, I have this Tattoo on my arm that's the Japanese symbol for soul, but it's like two characters, but if you cover up one of the characters, that's the sign for devil, who, which I didn't realize until I got to Japan the first time with it in my shirt sleeve, was right there. And they're like Yakuza, which is the Japanese mafia, because apparently that's what they get on there. Yeah, it's like it's they're the only people that really get tattooed. I'm sure the kids do you now, but anyways, there's definitely a dark side. I'd like to take a second to thank you for listening to the dive Bar Rockstar podcast. As a new podcast, getting the word out as a vital part of what it takes to keep the show on the road, or off the road, as their current case. Maybe if you would like to support the podcast, all you got to do is subscribe wherever you listen and if you have an extra minute or two, please leave a review. You can also share and follow the podcast on your social media APPS. Okay, enough begging. I hope you're having fun and once again, thank you for listening. What did it all that we do? At that time? We were doing Richard Street, did Chester, another temptations guy, really great. Yeah, that was pretty fun. We different dynamics and I think that all sort of led to this band clockwork. Yes, that was really fun. Gary Patrick Cover Band, another another pivotal point in my plane. Yeah, well, it was. It was a five night a week Gig in Vegas, probably two to three times a month. Yeah, in the first first month. We were out there for like five weeks or something, I feel like. Well, it all started with a we played at the brewpub actually one time, the first time that you played with Gary Yes who was the leader of the band's right, and then eventually the aval lounge, the Mirage wanted us, so we basically kind of moved to Vegas, you know, once or twice a months and yeah, lived at the Mirage hotel. It's amazing and the only reason I bring it up because it is because it was such an awesome experience and there's so many great musicians that played in that band that it's in that band and for me that was the turning point for Vegas. Yeah, and a lot of great musicians were out there and they were a lot of great band and there were two, three bands a night exactly. You Go to Vegas now and you've got a search for a band at all. Yeah, but back then every place had her like the avalongs that we played doesn't even have music anymore. That's like it's just a deadly expensive bar restaurant. Yeah, but then it was bands everywhere. It was Possi it was so fun because we'd get off from our thing and and because we only played what three hours? Yeah, I was like six thirty to thirty. We'd be done by nine and fifteen so they could get the other the next band on. I check them out, or we go somewhere else check somebody else out. I'd be drunk by thirty. Yeah, man, we got to do is get to the elevator, you know, and it's still up to it was. Yeah, it was. That was so great. But NARIKO played in that. You're wife playing that. Yeah, it's just some great musicians. That was really fun. and Jean Seagle, jeans Eagel, formerly of the band the Yeager Maestros. Yes, yes, he changed my life and probably wrecked it, for he introduced mediator moister and just it was a very fun companion for the next second fifteen years. I still have a bottle in the freezer right now, but I rarely partake any more. But at the time I died by rocks now record came out. It was just there's like three songs that talked about yeager on the record. It was that was weird. It was a way of life. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, it was a lot of fun because at the same time I was playing with kick them at Suey, which I eventually got you on that because its at me on that. And that turned into a couple of years at the journey, two great years. And here again that GIG. Eric, you like part of like all these pivotal points in my in my career, and playing well on the CACO Gig. You've been trying to get me on the GIG full while. Yeah, but there's a backstory that. So like we and I start playing and we got alise thing and coincidentally, from the Ali Gig before you came along. Melvin Davis played the Ali Gig. Play One, one show right, and from that show me days amazing, amazing led faibles player, Shaka Con Lee, written our exactly. Mareko got the shock a Gig and and then they started getting their thing together and and then, as a result of that thing and playing that Gig with Melvin, I got the shock at get nice and that was really cool. And then and then from that I got the another connection with Nurko's Tina Murie.

So I got the teen Murie GIG which, while they're being the Teena Murrie and Rick James Rights tour, which was Rick's last tour right, actually passed away. Wow, on a break from the tour. Yeah, after Rick passed away, we had one more show and it wanted to just be in a tena show and I was about to go out and do Rick's tour with the guy that took Marico's place in clockwork, which was Patrick Field. Yeah, yeah, so we got the call. Well, I found out that we could passed away while I was showering and we did the Teena thing and obviously the teina thing stopped. It had to. It just had to. Unfortunately. You know, everybody was cut off guard and she and Rick were, this is no secret. They were very close, right, I mean he kind of discolored. Yeah, well, yeah, then was response to US her first album. Yeah, you know, really are careers. So it was. It was a big deal and and we had the clockwork thing going, but you and I quit the clockwork Gig. Yeah, eventually they were like okay, this is big. Yeah, that's right. So a good like they were in this year and a half. They're like, okay, we're sick of but yeah, you're going to move, and I was like yeah, right, I love Vegas. I kind of eventually always dreamed of retiring there, but I was like not now. Yes, and this isn't the spot. I hit toyed with it only because I was looking at it from a dollars and since point of view. But I remember having the conversation with Rika and we weren't even we weren't engaged yet. I was about to propose interesting and meanwhile I had gotten divorced while we were in Vega. Yes, my my first marriage ended and in my second marriage was just just about to pop off. Right. Yeah, so she was adamant. She did not want to move to Vegas and at the time, ocean. Here's our oldest he was like Kay's age. She was like twelve or thirteen. He's well, yeah, so she's like it's no way, we're going to pull him out of school. Start and and and I went to a psychic. Yes, I went to a psychic, I'm not ashamed. And the psychic immediately I sat down and she says, okay, you're at a fork in the road. He's like, you got this opportunity in front of you to move here and make this money, but if you go on the other road, this is a bigger opportunity waiting for you. You got to be patient. Now you got to know that. One is instant gratification, any other one is, yeah, forever, and you can make decision yourself. She was basically like you don't need me to tell you right decision. I can, I can tell you you already now. You don't need to be here, right. So, right, right. That's when I said, okay, October thirty one, two thousand and four, my last Gig with clockwork. HMM, not a gig in sight. Yeah, I know nothing to and I honestly. I mean I had maybe some club stuff. ME, that's not try. I had kick out sue, yeah, but I had but kick about sus. Never enough to live on this right, just as a soul gig. But so I was taking I was just done, but I'm not going to be in Vegas Right. And that's so I freaked out big time. I didn't go into a dark period, but I just was for November, December, freaking out. What am I going to do? and Rio Okamoto, WHO's another amazing Keyboardist, Japanese keyboards, he he called me on recommendation of another great drummer friend of ours, Jimmy, Keegan, who also was originally the drummer from our clockwork. Yeah, Jimmy was back playing with clockwork and he couldn't do Rio's Solo tour between Europe and Japan. And, by the way, Rio and Jimmy, or Jimmy's no longer in the band, but Rio is a founding member of spos beer, like one of the most Badass prog rock bands ever to yeah, the on the face of the your so so Jimmy recommended me for that and and I just was like okay, all right, let me think about it. And we're on the phone. The Rico's driving and Nurko says, is that Rio Okamoto? And I go yeah, and Rio says that's Noriko and and the put her on the phone. So they go and they speak Japanese, Blah Blah, blah, blah blah, and they hear things. She gives me the phone back and he goes see man, it was meant to be. And so I go and I do Rio's tour and it wasn't a lot of bread,...

...but it was it was enough. It was cool and it got me out and got me playing another style of music that I'd only toyed with me even at Berkeley, not even which was prog rock and real. If anybody's checked out box beard stuff, it's intense. Yeah, and Rio Solo stuff is even more intense because it's real. So they're not stuck into like they spokespers never stuck into any formula of of Prog rock thing, if there is that, but Rio would definitely put his other, hmm, influences in there. Right. So, so I did that for the month of December and I come back home and you call, Hmm, and you offered me the Kikomutze kick. Yeah, and like I sit yeah, because I mean I've been a fan of a goes, you know, since we were in high school. And when we hung up I literally cried. I mean I ball that, because I was like I come home from the Japan tour and I was like I have no idea what I'm going to do now. Yeah, right, wow. Well, I'm so happy that that happened in the timing was right. Yes, I don't know that. I mean I was a musical director after a few years with Kiko, mainly because she her English. Isn't that gray? You know, I'm in town, I know a lot of musicians so I was more kind of a I feel like I'm interpreter and like I would we need a guitar player, I go find a guitar player, you know. So it was it wasn't a traditional musical director role. necessarily. I wasn't putting together the band and make sure they were a great and Kego came out and we did shows. You know, Kego's very much sort of still in charge, but sometimes she would see would start to say something and then she would look at me and I'd be like play it like this. You know what I mean? and to me, because like you call it, sorry not to cut you off, you call it kind of unconventional musical direct and I look at it, is is exactly what a musical director is. He does administrative duties first, or she right, and then the music comes next. Yeah, right, yeah, pretty much. And I, yeah, do all the charts, you know. And and yeah, I would never have to fire anybody, thankfully, but that because there was always management for that, which is awesome. So it was kind of a dream gag in a way. But you know, you still it's an interesting thing and you've been musical director for on a lot of acts and it's an interesting role to be in because, on one hand, if you're interacting with musicians in town, they know you might be able to get them a Gig, so it kind of opens up doors and a way and people will talk to you that if they don't know you or they do know you. But on the other hand, do you end up kind of having to be a bad guy a lot of times, and and that can get tricky, because there's guys that on the CACO Gig, came on that did not cut it. Yeah, but they were phenomenal players and like I would love to do other gigs with them, but I've got to be on your ass because Cago's not happy and like that's making and this isn't about what I think of what you're playing, it's about what I think about what Kiko needs you to play like, because she was not, is not, is not a person who's like yeah, man, play, we feel yeah, she's super specific. It's really like playing a cover gig. Yeah, when I give you the CD, I'm I wanted that Vuye that fills and everything, like you might think that Phil was just a guy doing a cool thing that night. No, if she doesn't hear that fill. That's going to throw her exag off. You know, you know and she comes from and all those contemporary jazz acts from that period, they come from that. That's what they did. Yeah, I mean, you know, well, she's also classically try and pianist from Japan, so she's got classical way of thinking and sure this is how it goes. And you know, that's it on the musical directive standpoint. That's one of the biggest things that I learned. was asked the artist questions. Yeah, I'd rather not be in the dark. Just tell me what you want to. Tell me what you expectedly, I remember when when Rickey minor made me the MD for Michael Bolton. That was like, you know, after working with Michael's previous musical director of Chris Combose, another just amazing guitarist, to bear this do and is just insane. And he was, he is a great leader. I mean just like everybody of work, between Ricky or Melvin Davis, you, Chris, Doug Griggs, all these guys had the one thing I learned from them was they asked questions. And for me the biggest thing is what is what do you expect of me? Right when right, because every artist is different and every and that indep...

...positions different for every artist. Yeah, right, yeah, I think that's right. And the thing about Kikos that we had worked together so much and in her originally her husband, Kazu, her then husband, because they got divorced y shortly after I did. He was always in charge and but he was also a very like he paid a lot of attention to stuff and like I think he picked up right early on that I got it, like yeah, I get how this is supposed to go. So even early on Kasey would sort of turn to me and like tell him what I mean, Urs you know, and so she just trusted that I got her music, you know, and that's a not always the case, I think as musical director, sometimes it's like you see it a different way than the artist would want it. Yeah, but you do what you're you know, you do what your job is calls for. This was more like I feel like me and her had a pretty good understanding of what we were doing. So I would just be myself, sure, and it was usually in line. Not all the time. Sometimes she'd go against what I'm saying, but you know, they go okay, do your thing, you know. But she was always she's always super nice. She's just the way. I would tells this just but she's going to nicely ask you to do this until you do it right or you go right. You know, she'll be somewhat polite about it, but she's not going back down. Now. Don't think that they're just Kinda give her lip service and do whatever. But you came in and it's same situation, though. That's what was so great about you showing up is that you just got it. Well, I can played in a way that turned her on as well. Well. It was cool. I could immediately hear CAGO'S GIG was. Well, I knew it was kind of a Bernie dressul thing, even though our Rodriguez was the guy that you replaced. Yeah, that I reprid, but I could hear. I could, you know, Bernie was on a lot of records, right, and so I could hear the influence and how important that was, right, and I can't and I heard what art was doing. So what I made sure of was that I played it as closely to that, in particularly the Bernie Way, as possible. Then, when I heard some opportunities to put some chaddisms in there, right, I took a chance. Yeah, and it does happen to line up. Yeah, you know, because really it's definitely Bernie and I don't know, I love to have Bernie on the show and talk to him about this. Bernie dress little phenomenal drummer plays. His big claim to fame, I guess, is Brian Setter Orchestra. He played with him for years. But at any rate, Vinnie, how you do, is really what she's hearing, right. That's really her thing, and so I think even Bernie is sort of doing Vinnie, you know, but Bernie is one of those guys that is Bernie all the time. So Ron's version of VINNIE was cool alternative. Now you go and you do Bernie, but you've turned it into something that you do, but it's always starting from a place that she enjoyed. Right. Other guys get on there and they immediately want to do their thing and I'm like, I know that it's it's supposed to be a jazz gig, but anything I can't jazz GIG. You know my what I told a lot of people the secret to my success is I do the research with what the ever artists I'm going out with or even auditioning for, and I try and hone in on like who the favorite drummer is. Of you can tell, you can really sense, yeah, what artist is, is happy with what period of would and that's where I try and go. Yeah, and that that's my first thing, is to capture that thing. HMM. After I capture that thing, especially on a pop gig or I'll I'll sit with that for a while before I even start the rear chat in yeah, because I know there's very important for them to get that. I mean with with with Michael Bolton, Michael just wanted like the record. Yeah, and that was extremely cool. With that, that was that was something that I learned where every GIG is not for every drummer, just like I'm that for every GIG, right, but it takes a very special drummer scratch. It takes a very special musician to play the same way night after night regardless. And and so you have to make it a game. You have to go how much more perfect can I play tonight than last night? Yeah, yeah, and to do that and keep the same live energy every time, keep you in the sound like you've done it the same way for exactly here and you can't sound bored. And and it may be. I know it's boring for a lot of guys, but the whole point is, well, maybe the to take the board amount you got to go. Well, okay, how much more can I dig into this part right from last night? Did yeah, I put up like that. It's like trying to play video game right and you're trying to get the best score. Yes, exactly. The other thing that's nice about a Gig like that because twice, not far from...

...that, it's like he respects the record and he likes consistency and for me, I feel like it takes a lot of the stress away of like I don't have to make as many decisions. I know what I'm going to get into. I know I'm going to go out and I'm a play it like this and I'm going to go home, and it's you know. I mean ultimately it's a job, you know, and and if you honor it like that, then it's not such a mind fuck, you know, like but some guys can't do it, some guys can't handle it. You can't forget that it is your job. Even I used to tell my first wife this. Got To love what you did. Yeah, yeah, you gotta Love Your Job. MMM, if you don't, what's the point? Right? So, with the mindset of it being a job, then remember why it is that you you doing it in the first place, right. Yeah, and if you don't think it, get out of it. Yeah, but it's it is a job. So you have to fulfill that job, Sup job description of what it is, right, and then after that, you know. So how is that compared to now? You're out on the road to Bruce Horns. People not now, no one's on the road anybody, which we can talk about if we want. But yeah, this is a weird time to start a show like this talking about how to get way to the music business when there's no music. That's right, it's a great time to talk about this. Okay. Well, I mean I think it'll be. It's good because people be available. Yeah, and we're going to work, I mean, you know. Yeah, so now you're Bruce Hornsby and the noisemakers, your actual member of the band. I am it's any voice maker which is still cre exee, and that's a different kind of thing too. You're not, you know. So how is that playing wise compared to Michael Bolton? Are you playing it like the record? Are you just doing your thing? Is it somewhere in between? I would say it's somewhere in between, Bruce May, because it you me, it is a band, but there is a name in front of it, so there is still see end. and Oh yeah, do you still have to satis letter boss? Yeah, here's what I so if in anybody's ever seen any Bruce Hornsby show, whether it's him solo, it's the noise makers, or he's done he did trio things some years back with Christian McBride and Jack D Jeannette. HMM. It still flows my mind like she was. So it's definitely it's in the spirit of the grateful dead of we're not going to play the same show every night and we're not going to play the same song same way twice. HMM. Ever, it's always going to be changed, so always going to be different. So then with that, what I've learned is, so you've got your parts, the foundation, and Bruce wants, because he's like that with himself, the foundation has to stay the same. That is, if there's a specific groove that I have to play or something I have to play that group. HMM, if he says you could do something, you know cool. I mean we did last year on tour. We entered, he brought back a couple old songs and really fun stuff. But there was one where I was so for whatever reason, went back into a cover mode, like I was playing, because he was like a lot of loops and stuff and I was really recreating that whole thing. Right, and so, and you know, it's down check. He would say, yeah, man, you you have to be so stagged it. You can get off, you can create a more interesting part than that. You know, will go ahead, be you. I'm I'll let you know right we're not to do something. So I still have to get used to that M remembering like I'm I have some poetic license here, but that's brusty. So and then once we were off, we're off. Ben I mean you know, if it's total communication, if somebody plays something and it inspires someone, that person will go with that inspiration and do that thing, which will inspire somebody to do something, which inspire somebody else to do something. Next thing you know, six guys have went off on a tangent from one thing and we've created something completely different. Well, that's what he wants. Yeah, that's awesome, and not to mention that I've filling some crazy ass shoes. Yeah, because the previous guys, sunny, a Marie Boys, Lucas, John Molo, I mean you know these are guys, right. Mike Baker, yeah, she wiz right, you know the company he keeps. Yeah, so it's like that's that's kind of in my head too, especially Sonny. Sunny such a, yeah, huge inspiration of mine, and he loved Sonny. Oh Yeah,...

...yeah, big time. He played the good well, extremely Y. Yeah, because I think that's interesting too, because like how you come into a Gig sort of, and we don't have to talk specifically, but if you know, if you're coming into a GIG after guy's been fired, then don't play like that guy, you know right. But if you're coming into a gig where something happened and the guy left the GIG or you know whatever circumtimes, but the artist was pretty pleased, you know, play like that guy. Go with that. Yeah, my money's on the guy that he or she loves every time. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, every time. There's plenty of time for you to be right. So where does you also now? Currently also play with the Jackson's? Yeah, have you're one of those guys in town. They have two amazing gigs. Yeah. So where is that fall and how you approach the Gig? As far as do you play like the record? I mean I've seen the show. It's not like the record. No, it's not like the right, the Jackson's Jonathan sugarfot MOFATT. It's the cat that really put his stamp on the live ass right Jackson show. So when I got the GIG I just immediately embodied sugarfoot. That was the key. The guy that had the gig before me was Charles Streeter and he had to leave the Gig, fortunately for me, HMM, unfortunately for the brothers. He had to leave good because he got the Jlo Gig. And shoot, is like another cat from Memphis who's just killing. Cat's got the group thing, but he's got the chops thing to and he's yeah, you know, just like a great all around drummer. MMM. So, so I had the show tape of of Charles, but I did basically what he did, but in the in the style of sugar foot. And so when they heard that they were like yeah, you get okay, we're cool, right, we're good. Yeah, and I'm doing that kind of research will get you the GIG, you know, nine times out because so important, man, if you take that care and you really care about the artist music and you put the time into the details of of all that stuff, yeah, nine times out of ten it's going to get you a GIG. Yeah, and and on the tracks is Gig, because we have to play the same way every night. Even my drum solo, everybody gets a bar interesting and and it was like at the beginning of the thing it was like, okay, this is my e bars, do my thing and if it was something I was thinking of, I would work on it and I play it. And then one night I played whatever I played, which is what I play now. And so the next night I played something completely different, because I'm like this is my eight bars, right, and they just all four of them like no, wow, play that thing that you played the other night. See its like. And that's what was that thing that I played the other night? The only thing I remembered playing, was the only thing I remember doing was to stick toss because I was clowny. The was like how wasn't it? That was just having fun and clowning and we all I'll do this, and I did it with the Double Bass thing and all that, and then I did some whatever, the thirty second thing that I do around the kid and they love that. So I have had to play that every night now for the last yeah, and that might blow some cats minds. Like, don't let it blow your mind that, like, I know it says Solo, but this is what they want. Yeah, know, and and do that. A Chad rerids me of another Gig we played on. Sorry to cut you know right. Another good play on Lee written our that you got me on. Yeah, I subbs, you know, is Melville's GIG. He's awesome about it, but I was fortunate enough to be available. But I remember you'd always do an impression. Are you gonna twirl the sticks tonight, Jad thing? Yeah, so you have your Drummery Goller and a stick twirling. Huh, you can't really get out of that? Why? Don't know. Well, okay, so on the Bruce Gig, I don't maybe maybe there's one song when we play across the river when we do the triplet thing at the end of the Guitar Solo. I'll do stick towels, but I only do it specifically to keep me from Russian and which is mostly anytime I'm doing a stick towel. It's that my...

...purpose is to keep me from Russian, because that's that's that's an issue I'm still working on to this day, and me too. That's why we played around. I think we Russian the rushed in the exact same time, so that's so funny. So, other than that, I try not to do the flashes because then you know, here get, I think sound. He's put such a stamp on the Hornsby Gig that I'm already getting compared to them, which I'm that's the GIG. I'm cool with that. Yeah, but if I were to go and do that thing, then people will go, okay, you're just trying to be sunny and and that's the job description. It's like no, I don't want to do that, because you know and but it's also forced me to because every other song I'm so lowing and on the Hornsby Gig. So it's forced me to go into places I've never gone before on the spot, you know, different sounds and different approaches to pull out some musicality. That's been and pent up inside of me, or it just never had been in there. I saw something else and when let's try that, right, right, right, wow. Well, we are talking forever and we re armed and we haven't talked about high school musical or Bean Blue Skip foot. Well, has know. What I'm thinking is there is in the gonna have to be a Chad right, part two. Okay, at some point later on it, because there's so much talking about. I want to get to talking about your studio and you know, I don't know. You keep mentioning transcendental meditation. Is that where you're? Yeah, I mean I know that you were a big into the secret for a minute. Well, that's what tipped it off. Yeah, which I kind of am to. It's like something I don't talk about that much, but I've kind of adhered to it. I stopped being shy about it. How it came about was so the end of two thousand and fifteen, November, I had gotten so complacent in my playing or I went into a place that I vowed I would never go to and I was so comfortable and I wasn't sitting behind the kit like I would normally sit behind the kit when I was home. Off The road. That was just in home mode, being a dad and going around doing local gigs and things of that nature, because it was like, okay, well, I'm home for a couple of months and I'll make the most of it. Right. And Ricky myner called me for a Gig he and his band were doing in town and I'd stayed up the night before working on somebody's mix and on top of that, and that's just nothing compared to you, I didn't prepare for the GIG the way I should have. May I got I had the charts and I made my notes and I didn't sit and and it was groove music. But here and again I always play the stuff down and really play down your comfort. But I was so tired and I got up and I went to rehearsal and it wasn't feeling right. The only song and that felt right was can't hide love by R winning fire MMM, and Paul Jackson Junior said something. Everything was like Chad Right, ladies and gentlemen, but it woke me up because we rehearsed for maybe another hour. So went down all the music and stuff and and then ricky pulled me aside. He's like Yo man, it's not feeling right. What's going on? And you know a couple of other things that were happening on something else that that was involved in. And and he I'm not speculating what he was thinking because I never really asked him, I could just tell maybe it was he had mentioned, like maybe it's the cats that you're playing with right now, because he's like this is not the guy that I know, this is not the guy that's come in time after time and just nailing it right. So I was definitely tired. So Paul's thing was Paul's comment made me go, Oh wow, now I know what it means about playing something in my sleep. MMM, because I've played it so much, I know it so well, as opposed to the other music where maybe I played it once or twice, maybe had never played it at all, was reading my ass off. So that wasn't the issue right. It was the feel and the energy and it was I was tired and and really didn't prepare. So he's like, Hey, I can't use you on this Gig. Wow. And it was an eye opener because he'd also mentioned like I'd put on a little weight. Wow. And and he was like I could tell this is a different cat, because he's like, you know, you're the guy you work out in the mornings, you run, you know, and are you doing any of that? And it was like I'm not anymore right. So at that point I went I'm changing. Yeah, and then a month or so later I was doing New Year's, New Year's Eve Gig with awful one,...

...and my brother texted me said Hey, the secret is on Netflix, and I was like, what the Hell is a secret? And I watched it in the hotel room and it was like I got to get more of this. So I bought the book mm and I read it and then a friend of our, close friend of ours, said, if you like the secret, you should check out what the what the bleep do we know, right down the rabbit hole, and I watched that documentary and I went, Oh man, I got to get more of this. And then that hit me to joe to spins, and then I started doing the meditation thing, like right there on the spot, just little bits and pieces. So literally, like the day before Ricky called me for that Gig, I was like I'm just going to try this. So I meditate it and I channeled Ricky calling me HMM. And so I freaked out when he actually called. But after watching the secret and yeah, and and what the bleep it started to done on me, this whole better physical universe. Yeah, and and I and is off for run it. Yeah, it's worked. Yeah, great, yeah, yeah, I started maybe four years ago, just every January, were usually have some down time. Anyways, I watched the movie and like every every time I get something out of it that I start to use and and it's almost like what you need is going to pop out at you. Sure every time I watch it. You know, I haven't gotten much farther than that, but I mean it's worked like crazy. Like the one year was there's a part in there where he says money comes frequently and easily. Like if you just start thinking that, then it changes here. So then every time I start freaking out about money or like, oh my gosh, what am gonna do this month, I would just go, I was, just take a deep breath and relax and me like money comes frequently and easily, and boom, the whole covid nincing. So so when I came home from Jakarta and then literally, like we did one more rehearse for Warren's run and then Warren called the night before we were splitting. He's like yeah, you it can. So. So then it's lockdown. There's like no questions about it, we're locked down. Yeah, and there Eko is freaking out and I'm not, MMM, because of that very thing. Yeah, the freaking out part of it. What is that going to do? Yeah, absolutely. And the other thing that's been somewhat different about this is like this is not a bad decision on my part, like there's nothing I canna blame myself where we're all in this and like Xeah, well, there's nothing can do about it. So and I just happened to be in a good place. I had a little savings, you know, and like certain some residuals came in all the right place and I'm just like, you know what, I'm good, I'm just going to take a break, and this is what this is probably. I fear that I've manifested this on all y'all, because I just I needed this pause in my life. I think we all have did. It was funny. I had all the studio stuff backed up and I was going, okay, well, I'll just finish all this stuff in my hotel room. I've never really mixed with any monitors before, but I got a really great pair and right, let's put him to the test. Why not? If it works, it works, if it doesn't, it doesn't. And it wasn't anything too heavy that I was working on, but I was manifesting more studio work and less corporate fan work. And so for me I thought when the whole lockdown the game, it was well, here you go, here you go. First of all, problem solved. You don't have to worry about the finding time to finish your deadlines for the studio. Yeah, here it is. So I was able to do that and that forced me to really address a couple of things in the studio as an engineer that I really needed to address because I come from I'm an analog engineer. I'm that old. So the digital thing I still was getting to handle on, and this provided me the perfect time to really understand emerge this analog rule to this new digital world in the way we're measuring sound. Right, right. So, yeah, and you have a pretty significant setup. You do a lot of the great part about you because I use your tracks a lot, you know, and that's kind of the awesome part about just recording in general. Right now it's like drummer's got to have a set up, everyone's got to set up. You know, you can call a guy and they'll send you tracks and I never have to go anywhere. And but the great part is that you are an engineer. You did study that at Berkeley. So when I get your tracks, that I don't really have to do much. Yeah, you know, it's like it's a journey sounding record and I get a big snare and it's all equed and it's all nice and you plug it up, I mean you you put it in the and your da w and it's just great, you know. But so you've been doing a...

...lot of that. You do. You did that for Bruce Hornsby. Yeah, yeah, and I'm so the last Oh man, it was a fun record. Yeah. So, yeah, the last album, and then the album is coming out and fall we tracked. We did three tunes where we as been sort of tracked over at my place and then I did all all the drum stuff there. And then there's a new album that we're going to start. We're supposed to start this week. See, and obviously when they extended lockdown, bruce was like, yeah, okay, we're going to have to wait. But the whole band was flying out with three of us are here and then, you know, to are in Nashville and Bruce's in Virginia. So so everybody was coming out to La and we were just going to take a week and record at my house. Wow, so and rehearse for the tour. So the tour which is now been to push so far to August. But well, yeah, this has been awesome. Definitely think we have to have part two. We should. There's still so many stories I didn't tell and so many things and but I really appreciate you being on the show. I think people are going to get a lot out of it. You're an amazing guy to learn from. Well, likewise and because you're also just a great guy. You know, you're great, phenomenal drummer. Anybody can look you up on Youtube, but you're also a really great guy and I think that's such another key part to being to being a road guy in general. You got to get along with people, you gotta get Nice. People gotta like you to put you on their Gig. Yeah, and you're just a master of both. So I'm still working on it. Yeah, man. Well, thanks, you're coming on. Thanks for heaveny man. This is the part of the show that I like to call afterthoughts and just going to give you some of my thoughts on what we just went through and things that I'd like to highlight. And the first thing is that Chad started in a bar band in New England, which I think is totally cool because he's a legit dive bar rock star. Lines wrapped around the buildings he talked about, which I actually saw them play one time. I was out there. It was weird. I was in Boston doing a kick him out Suey Gig at scullers and and Cambridge and Chad and Arrico and Shay, his brother, we're doing a temptation gig somewhere in the area. So after both our gigs we all got in a car and M and saw cats Hans and they were awesome and very cool and very popular and very drunk. It was awesome. The other thing that's amazing about Chad that I think is important is that he still practices. This is a guy with a career like that and he's still got you know, he talked about the three month mark. He's still got a regiment that he kind of does, you know, and I thought it was really cool that he told that ricky minor story because it didn't really go his way. It didn't make him look great. You didn't have to tell that, but that's how honest he is about his own playing and that constant looking in the mirror really keeps his chops up, and that's what it takes to kind of stay on top and have a career like that. So it's, you know, it's really important. I also I played with a guy named Nelson Ranchel, who is a SAX player from Denver. He's you probably know him. He's great, but he he practiced eight hours days, you know, he probably still does, and he likened it to training for a sport. He had the mindset of an athlete and I always thought that was amazing and kind of changed my way of approaching all of the stuff. I'd also like to make some corrections or clarifications on some things that we didn't have time to fully explain. We're talking about Berkeley College of Music in Boston and not this Super Smart School in California, which is something you get really used to explaining when you are associated with Berkeley College of Music. MPNE stands for music production and engineering, which is a major at Berkeley, and he talked about the the Kenny Air and off Efect, which I thought was a great way of putting it. I've never heard of put that way, but essentially carrying. Kenny are off was the drummer for John Cougar mellancamp in his band and through that popularity and because of his amazing chops, he became the incredibly sought after drummer that he is today. Like he's on tons of records and plays alive with all kinds of awesome artists. So look up Kenny are and off. He's great. The cafe cordial manager. That was the club in La that that I first saw Chad at. His name was Peter May. If you ever run into him, shake his hand, give him a hug thank him for everything that he did for the music scene. While that that here in La while that place was open, the brew pub was in the at the Monty Carlo. That was the first place that I me and Chad played with clock work in Vegas, and that's not even there anymore, so don't go trying to find it. Also, I said I was originally from Denver, then I said I was originally from New York and you're probably all super confused, but anyways, I'm I was born in New York. I grew up in Denver. And one other weird thing is like when I was musical director for Kiko, I mentioned that I was more of an interpreter. I don't speak Japanese, so that's I just meant musically, because I kind of understood her music and could relate it to other people. So don't...

...try speaking to me in Japanese because it won't go well. Anyways, I hope you had a good time. Wow, you've made it to the end. I'm hoping it's because you completely enjoyed yourself and are now filled with knowledge and inspiration to move forward with your dreams. If that is the case, and you would like to stay informed of new episodes, live events in general news, please go to dive Bar rockstarcom and sign up for the mailing list. If you have any questions, comments, corrections or complaints about anything you here on the show, please email me at fan mail at dive Bar Rockstarcom and you may even end up on the show. We at the dive Bar Rockstar podcast with all of our hearts. Thank you for listening and remember it's all about dreams.

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