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The Dive Bar Rock Star Podcast
The Dive Bar Rock Star Podcast

Episode 13 · 1 year ago

Bill Cinque- We Leave on Sunday (Neil Diamond, Peter Asher)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Bass Player, vocalist, producer and author, Bill Cinque remembers his time on the road with Neil Diamond and explains how he got the gig. He describes how he came to his unique way of playing the bass (upside down and left handed). Bill and host, Eric Baines, reminisce about they’re first meeting. Bill tells stories from his book entitled, “The Amazing Adventures of a Marginally Successful Musician”. He also shares his experience as a public speaker.

The Amazing Adventures of a Marginally Successful Musician:

https://www.amazon.com/Amazing-Adventures-Marginally-Successful-Musician/dp/1440115672

www.billcinque.com

Do you love audiobooks? You can get athree thirty day: Trial, membership to audible, dotcom by visiting audiviltrial, dotcoms last dive bar rocks star. They have thousands of Audiobov titlesas well as podcast, guided wellness programs, theatrical performances,aliss, comedy and exclusive audible originals. You won't find anywhere else,get your free trial membership at audible, trial, dtcom, Flash Dibar,Rockstar, welcome to the Diebar rock star,podcast, a show exploring the lives of professional musicians of all typestouring, musicians, recording artists, songriders engineers, barbands weddingbands and anyone making theire living in the music industry, whether you'vedreamed of being a professional or you already are one. This is the podgastfor you on your host Eric Banes, and I hope that you not only find someentertainment here, but also some helpful tips, trade secrets and ideasthat will help you achieve your dreams. I try to keep these episodes down toless than an hour and a half really I'd like to be closer to an hour, but I Ifail at at every single time. 'cause I as a listener of podcast and a fan ofpogast. I I kind of prefer a little shorter they're easy to take in duringthe day. You know an hour an hour and fifteen. You know. Maybe fifty threeminutes might be the ideal to me, but I wanted to reach out to you as elistener, to get your opinions on what you think and if this is a good lengthand if you're enjoying this or if this is usually too much, this episode willbe split into two different episodes because it just it went long. We were, we talked overtwo hours and we mentioned that in the potcast, so don't be confused, B'causeth. At the end of the day, I think the pot cast will be about an hour andtwenty five minutes, but we do mention that we went over two hours which wedid. We talked for two hours and then I ended it t down over the course of twelve hours or so it is a lot of work. But Anyway, let meknow what you think about the length of a podcasting whether these are good orbad. You can email me at fan mail at Diearockstar dotcom. You could commenton on you tube. If you wanttod, you could hit me up on instagram Um, dive,arock star or there's the Dabar Roxer podcast page on facebook. So anyway youcan get a hold of me. Let me know what Di you think I' I'd love to hear youropinions and speaking M. I guess. We've beenfriends for twenty years he's one of the first people that I met when Imoved out to l a he's, the author of the book, the Amazing Adventures of amarginally successful musician, which is a really really fun. Read ties inreally well with what this you know. What the mission statement of thispodcast is: It's all about working musicians, he's toard and recorded withmany many people, few of which Peter Asher bokags, thefray, Jerry and the pastemakers Denny Lane chat and Jeremy, the Bay city,rollers, gramnash, Lile, Loveitt Stevie, Ni, Zoidash inow. He was also the lasttouring basist with Neil diamond before Nel retired, and he played on a coupleof records with neal as well. So He's a great guy he's a great base player he'sa great singer. So please enjoy my conversation with bill sink. We first met at the brass elephant. Idon't know if you even remember, but the first time I ever walked in. Therewas a Wednesday night and there was like you guys were having a singer Songriter night at some point on Wednesdays. I think it was you and Eric Stagen, monkeyboards andChristopher Alice, maybe yeah and Bobby Williams, yeah and h I walked in and atthe time I was a guy who played numerous bars and didn't drink as well. I ordered a diet, coke and Dave Ot. Thebar just almost died laughing. It was pretty funny now. Do you remember thatnight, though? Do you becauseyou were pretty new to l a at the time, r yeah, I'm thinking that was maybe January. Imoved hear in October. Okay I'll tell you how well I remember that night.Okay, I was playing. I have. I had a tiny little bassaup andour good friend the dearly departed Bobby Williams, who you know was one ofour great friends, Yeah Bobby says to me M. I I was I was doing. I was doinga lot of different stuff at the time, so I didn't Really Co. I couldn'treally commit to every Wednesday at this place at the brass elephant, sobobby said, look if you don't mind Um, maybe I'll bring in Guye to kind ofaddition, while you're here- and I said of course this one night- you said...

I just got Ta call from this Guy Eric,I think, I's from Colorado and he's going to come in and I hope that's notuncomfortable for you and I said no now, if you remember you walked in and Icame over and Saidotou right away, because I was like no. I want this guyto feel comfortable. I was looking at the amp with you saying. Okay, if youwant to adjust it, I don't Care Rath and now maybe I'll embarrass you, okay,because I'm thinking well is poor. Young kidfrom the mountains of Colorado doesn't know anything about the big city. SoI'm going to be the daddy here and take hem under my wing and show 'em, andthis guy named Eric Baynes, who I've never heard of never seen, gets up andplays and sings so so well, so ridiculously well, and Ilooked at Bobby I sayd. Well, I guess the GIG is in good hands now ecause I was thinking of quitting. I think nowI just got fired 'cause you were, you were stellar. You were great well, butI remember, but I remember thinking like you know well you're younger thanI am, and I'm Goingna show you the ropes here and show you about the ampright. You did just FYOU. I just well. Thank you. I wasn't fishing for thatstory. No, I no! I remember it. I I was surprised that you remembered it yeah.Well, I was going to say that it was interesting because I came from Denverand a I came up through the bars. You knowthree four or five nights a week, so it Wa that that atmosphere wasn't new tome by any means, but you know it it's sort of at that time.It was now there Wa well, it doesn't exist now, but eventually there was abig stage on the other side. This was just like a tiny bar at the time youguys were playing behind a pole. Oh there was a pole right in the way youcouldn't help. The speakers up. You had to put one of the speakers on thewalkway up to the restroom. If you remember yeah exactly, and so, if youwalked into a bar that was like that in Denver generally, the ban's probablynot going to be very good. I don't want to put anybody down from Denver atgreat thuns of awesome musicians, but not as many as L A and it w it juststruck me when I walked in it was like this is a Wednesday night in Monteroviawhich, if you're not familiar with la it's, it's barely even in L A it's. Youknow it's out past Pasadena, that's what everybody said like like: BeyondPasadena everything is a Felma and Louise Rightyu Oif. It's the flatteretsociety, there's something out there past Pasadena, but we don't know whatit is right right. So I was just struck by this: the quality of musicianshipand the songs nd, and I was like I. It was just more evidence that I h'd made the rightdecision o moving out here. You know. Well I remember hearing well. Thank you.I mean that was that was a cool little band and it was kind of a goofy littleplace, but I remember specifically Um you know I probably handed you my cardand we traded numbers and I honestly kind of watched you rise up through the ranks because I startedhearing from y other friends, yeah, ther's, Baseplayer Eric and I said,Herik bans yeah. I don't know much about Hem. No, I know Hem. I met himsix months ago and a year ago and two years ago- and you know I uh- I was there when you played the staplecenter ohwow. Yes, I was in the Audian. That'swhen you were planning o come with Bobby with high school music yea sright. He and like ten people that that Babiad and you guys a yeah. We camewith ten people. There was another twenty two thousand HOA head of us ofcourse, and that was you and, of course, ourour great friend Chadright, the greatest drummer in the world, who hasalso been on this show and H. Yeah, I mean if, if fow folks out there in inpod, cast lant ever get a chance to hear Eric and Chad players arhythmsection it's it's pretty special. I mean I've had the place of you know thepleasure of being on stage in front of you guys singing. While you guys areplaying and it's kind of it's a bit of a freight train- I mean you guys- areTe gratith them section in town. Well, thank you. I you get to be on the show every weeknow, I'm I'm a pretty good Wayman, I'm I'm like Egnicman on these kind ofshows, but w well, that's interesting! I I honestly didn't expect that story, but it'sthat's Kindo cool I mean for whone it's. That means we've known Ach oter twentyyears, almost Eill be twenty years of me being here, yeah, which is kind ofawesome and and the brass elephant then became me and bobby were best friendsfor years up until he died and- and I ended up being at the brass elepant-sometimes four nights a week 'cause that we just hung out there and thenyou know we, since we played there so often the drinks were always free, soano er, good reason either. But speaking of Bobby, he was a abandleader that Um. How do we put this like on stage? He would kindof justcall whatever songs and if you Kinda knew it great, it was almost you perporpreferred that you didn't know it, because he enjoyed the mess with thearrangements, and it was a very you had...

...to be on your toes musically and whichwas a lot of fun, but at the same time sometimes it was frustrating if Ireally knew the song- and I really missed a part that wasn't on there andand I wonder what yeartake on it m as a you know, you've played you know fiftyfive hundred gigs, apparently obeall of them not bars of it. Y. U know,obviously, but honestly, this is amazing that you would say this because a lot of the time I really did not likeit now. I learn to love it and if I can, thisis hardly dropping a name because it's most people under the age of maybefifty five won't even know this person. In back, I did all the British invasionpeople, as you know. I did you know Peter in Gordon and Cha an Geremy andthe searcher is an you know, but one of the guys that was a big beetle h. You know part of theBeatle Story. Was a guy tbe name, attony Sheidan. Have you ever heard? Ohyeah, right yeah. I think Tony passed away a couple of years ago, but I gotthe chance to play with Tony now. Here is why I bring this up our friend bobbythat we were talking about that. We put us in these situations where he didn'teven yell ot a key and he would play a fast song, really slow. He'd play aslow song like a Chachah, whatever rigteright the Great Tony Sheridan, andwhen I played on the sixties circuit with him, he was a big deal. You know Imean this: Is We played in Las Vegas? He walks out and just says to the band, I'm just going to play what I feel and I felt like those five hundred gigs-that I did at the brass elephant under those conditions here I am in front oftwelve hundred people with Tony Sherard and just I won't even try the accentbut just no bro, it's okay, just whatever that's really. That was therehearsal Raesa and I felt wow, I'm really prepared for this M.I'm really prepared for this. I could not have planned that this guy wasnever going to send you C ds or charts. I don't read charts anyway, but I meanh. There was less than zero preparation, you know yeah and it really felt verycomfortable and I had to kind of Giggle at myself. While I was doing it 'cause.I was very present if I cal use that word, you know where I was. I was as Iwas playing. It sounded great. The band sounded great and all I could think ofwas everything about. This was completely unplanned, and yet I wasprepared. How does that happen? You know. So you know the idea of learningthings from a bargaing, probably not evident after you've,driven through a snowstorm and hauled your ramp up three flinhts of steps andplayed to nobody, but it obviously you know it. It does work out. I was not afan of playing as a trio. I was not a fan of that kind of loose, almostjamband stuff, and yet it worked out many times in my life to to really youknow, be the greatest thing that ever happened to me so yeah. Well, it isit's just another thing in your trick: Bag Yeah! Oh Yeah! You have done a lotof bars and you mention that Y. You, you aren't a drinker, never had a drink, umI'll steal a little story from my book. Essentially I say I've never had acigarette I'V. I've never smoked pot even now that it's legal or whatever itis N. I've never done anything close to an illegal drug. I've never had a a glass of wine. I've never had a beerand I cannot technically say I've never had a drink, and this is I'll make thestory kind. O Fast but Um, I have an older brother, my olderbrother Steve's, actually a great musician and his own right, and he was,as I always say, the first musician I ever I ever knew so he was in theservice and he came home he's eleven years older than I am so when I was I a somewhere around thirteen fourteen,he came, he was home and he was sitting with a friend. He was having a drink, and I said what's that he said. Oh,it's called the screwdriver. I had one, he poured another one. I hadanother one and I thought well. This is cool, I'mdrinking with my older brother. This is you know in that in that adolescentmindset MM. So I was just a good kid. I I never cutschool. I never played hookie, I never smoked cigarettes. The only thing I didwas Gettinto S. fist fights that's what I did so I got old enough. I got to benineteen and EW NEW YORK. The drinking age was nineteen Rait, I'm in my firstband and now after every rehearsal twice a week,we'd go out to t you know the cool bars and and try to meet women, which was soincredibly unsuccessful, but Um. My first time getting ready to have adrink, I'll go up to the bar said. Give me a screwdriver. I give me. Oh it'sterrible. I let it sit. I did the same thing for about and I'm trying not toexaggerate, but really it was probably two months. Every Thursday night we' goout I'd order, a screwdriver I'd take half a sip, it was terrible. Iwas asking every bar tender in New York. Can you change the glass? Can youchange? The ice was the orange juice batler. It was just terrible and people werelaughing at me the go. Why are you...

...spending whatever it was at the time?Yes is nineteen. Seventy seven but you're spending three buck. Minimumwage was two dollars and fifteenn cents, so spending three bucks on a drink andthey said why dod you do that. You Know Yo you're, just leaving them all overthe the thing you kno. I called my brother and I said Steve. You know thisis funny apparently you're the best bar tender in the world, because you're theonly one that makes the screwdriver that I can drink and he said what areyou talking about and I said well remember ten years ago it was sevenyears ago. He said that was horange juice. I would never give my littlebrother at thirteen years old, and I said what you told me and he said youhad three of them. In fifteen minutes of a thirteen year old kid Helescrewdrivers you have passed out, I went six or seven years really thinkinghey I've been drinking wow. So if I took that, what would you call it? Theaccumuilative you know putting all those ships together, it might havebeen half a drink somewhere along the line. I have ordered forty screwdriversand drank a total of one half. I Guess Right, Oh Gosh, that's funny so, butyeah. So I'm I'm just super clean living and Y H it it. It takes on adifferent UH conversation virtually every nightsomewhere. It gets into this conversation yeah every bar I've eversat at someone offers tat, buy me a drink and we have to go through thestory and then a bartenist says come on y ask bill and somebody else sayssomething and they make a joke out of it and send me a drink and it's it's horrific for Meo, sorry tobring it up. Oiwell. I was going to say like 'cause when I first startedplaying, I I was, I would drink, maybe like quarterly. You know, but I'v Neverhad the JO, never on the job, and if I had a drive anywhere it you know. So Ispent a lot of time in bars. You know sober and it's not the fun. You know D,How you get through it, I guess is, does the do you still enjoy playingclubs and bars because it seems like you do I love it? I love it B, t whatwhat's really? How do you do with drunks see? This is the funny thing asI've. Forgive me B'cause, I'm certainly notmaking fun of anybody who has you know a problem. I've already said, I knownothing about alcohol, but I'm an expert on alcoholics. You know, becauseI dealt with him and what's always interesting to me- is because I'm theonly sober one by one o'clock in the morning right, everybody's, even thebartenders, have had drinks at that point Um. I am like the bell weather. So onMonday morning, when people say wow, did you see Jimmy the other night wou?Did you see and I'm thinking? No, I saw you with Jimmi and you were drinking asmuch as he was. Everybody thinks the other person drank. Everybody thoughtthe other person was embarrassing themselves and I'm sitting there. Ihate to be judging Jur er they're yeah yeah Y. I got I got the low down right.That's very interesting, e're, a good Prirson to have around actually or ahorrible person. There's I'm the one who who busts you rightright rightright. Well, it's funny that Youe already kind of brought it up, but we Italk a lot of about college on here 'cause. I went to Berkeley for a minuteand and stuff like that, but I think that the whole bar thing is an educationthat you can't really buy and R nt and you know it it. It replaces a lot ofstuff. You know in a way you already got ta mention that be being it helped.Prepare you for this Gig you know. Are there there are other things that youthink you got out of playing the bars that you, you know wouldn't get out ofa school yeah I mean I'm sure I got a lot of things. t the idea of the idea of going to school, which youdid um you read charts. You know how to read Music Um. I have no idea. I really if you grabbedthe guitar right now and pointed at a fret on the string. I wouldn't knowwhat it is and that's Osure got if you say Gee Y. I got that. But if you saidOh add this, you know the six with the minor whatever I can play it by ear,but I don't know what you're talking about ithe thing about bars, um playingas often as I did. I played guitar for a while and then I'd play base, andthen he play with a five piece band and a two piece ban and a wedding band, andso the idea of the whole bar thing was: you walked in sometimes ot differentpeople and the different singer would play it in a different key or thedrummer would play it faster or you'd play in this little place where restacked on top of each other. So it was more than just the music right. Itwasn't just reading notes on the page or learning songs. It was the wholegroove of getting into I hade to get there early enough to set up stillsplash some water. On my face, I don't look like I just rolled out of bed. If I have any kind of cheat sheets, Ihave to put them where I can see them because you're in a bar there's notlike spotlights, and you don't have a road crew, helping you out the entire sup to nuts, as they say, there's no better place to get it thanin a bar yeah. You know, because you know that you have to load through theback door and walk through the kitchen...

...and yeah. So that's that was that's an artunto itself. I think a lot of people don't realize that yeah not to mention playing for four hoursat a pop y. u, and on your Ntyes you're standing up that long. You know you'reon thes somenfloors with a you know, a Shag rug thrown over it,and that's your stage and my God, my my thighs were aching, the I'm getting too old in this right.Well, it you said from you know: you saw me from the brass element to thestable center, and now you have gone from the brass element to one of thebiggest. You know, gigs in the world, Nildaimin Milldiamond, yeah h. That wasquite a transformation for me. So how did that GIG come up wow? This could be. This could be thethe three parter that will take twelve hours. Is there a twenty minute I'll cut it ina it's? Only six hours long believe me, you're listening audience is going tolete it yeah the essentially. What happened was this. I had just gottenoff a plane that day I was doing the British invasion thing with denny lanefrom wings terrist lovestor from the Hollys Mike pender from the the searchers, and it was h alsowith Peter Asher and with a chat in Germy. So it was just a greatwow andso. My rhythm mate was liberty, tovito great drama from GilOve hear yeah just came out with a book, I wouldn't mind my my buddy loh cool,yeah, very cool, just to go a sideline. I have a A. I think. I think it's a facebookmessage or a text from him from about five years ago, where he sends me nonsays: Hey Bill. I love your book. I've been thinking a writing one for yearsand I wrote back and well, you know as soon as you write it I'll buy it. Liberty's book just came out that'slast month, so it's a great book. If anybody wants to buy it, Soim fly home and anybody who's ever been onthe road knows this feeling. You know you get off the plane. You go home,there's no food in your refrigerator ECAUSE, you didn't go shopping, 'causeyou've been gone. I have a bag ful of laundry that I have to do. I haven'tbeen to the bank all Thi stuff, so I'm running aroundtown doing that stuff andI get the phone call and I can't hear what the guy's saying 'cause myearpiece. My ears are stopped up from the plane and the guy starts talking-and I said H: Can you repeat that? Please I'm sorry, I did not hear whatyou said and the guy in this very serious voice like this. It says YeahBill Um Anyway, we need a base player and you can highly recommend it and I said great: What's the name ofthe band now he had already said this B t I didn't hear it that first femnseconds, so I saidwhat's the name of the ban and he said Neal diamond and I waited for the Word Tribute Ota own, the tribue and again I'e toldthis story so many times, and it's almost word for word, but I uh, I saidwow what you know who recommended me and he said well Don Waz. Now donoasismagnificent producer has been around for a long time and done great things,and I said well, that's interesting 'cause. Idon't really know Don. I now I had met him uhhh at gg years and years ago hejust went. Hayman sounds great. That kind of thing right right and so the manager Gut on themanagement team says well. Is this your address? Isthis? Where you Li? Is this your phone number? Obviously y? You answer thephone, here's your email address and no this is, I have it from his office. Itsays I'll call bill and something trough the effect of He's a good guyand he's a good hang, which I came to realize how importantthat is: no Kaing, because there's a lot of great players that, with all the respect of their talent,you don't necessarily want to be on a plane and a boat and a train and onstage and eating with them mhmthree times a day if, if, if you can't getalong with them right, so as the story progressed, he said Sam is his name. Samu says: Can I callyou back and work out some of the details, I'd like to see us some timehis week? I said okay in the next three hours. He called me about six times.Everything was hey. Look. Can we do this? Can we do th the last phone call?Was it almost nine o'clock at night and he says loo? I know this is kind oweird, but can you come in tomorrow? I don't even have time to send you chartsor C ds. I don't even have a song list. Where can you just come in and myresponse was hey? No problem, I'm an Italian from New York, this stuffdoesn't scare me et, is roll and he's a great. The next day I walked in atthree o'clock. I spoke to the management and the engineer for aboutfifteen or twenty minutes, and they said Okay come out into the studio I,as by myself, with headphones, no band. They played me a track and said just go.You know just play. I di that for two...

...songs and I'm thinking. First of all,there's no. I don't have a chance in hell a getting this GIG. I don't read a note. I play left handedan upside down. There's nothing about this. That's for me! I ev TNOUG. Iwould love it, but there's no chance in help of me getting this Gig and there'sthat terrible feeling, where I'm sitting in the main room withheadphones on there behind the glass. I don't know what they're saying for all.I know they're saying: Oh, my God, what a waste of time! I don't know thatthere's not fifteen guys in the lobby waiting to come in B'cause. I wasthinking it was a Cattlecallyou K, H, I'm sitting there and it was probablyfifteen seconds, but it felt like an eternity and the overhead voics Um Build. You want a sandwich or somethinga cup of coffee. I said, no, I'm I'm good and I'm thinking I'm just going tograb myself and get out of here 'cause. You know we have other people to seeand there's another pause and he said: Do you have a couple of minutes and Isaid sure I thoughthey were going to boot up another song for me. Come on inwell, as I walk through this door coming into the studio into the controlroom, the other door swings open and the SGOYBOLKS and goes I'm going to domy best impression: okay, cool, hey bill hi, I'm Neil Nildiamond and MI respon good. I didn't mean to bea SMARTASS, but this was my response. I said Yeah. I know I I know who you are.You know like wh. What else do you say in that moment? Really Y? No Yeah so before I go too much further, just he kneels the greatest guy in the world,really the greatest boss, the greatest Hong or the Greater Song Riner he'severything you would think. There is no meeting your idol, you know and rightdon't eat feet of clay and all that stuff now hewas great. So we're talkingfor a couple of minutes and he says ah well, you know we um we're doing this promotional tour Bu.We got that cover, but- and this was in September, so it's actually coming upon my anniversary Um. He said, but here's we'll do. This isthe end of September we'll be on for a little while if you can come back inNovember and will do a proper audition we're doing a world tour in March lateFebruary march, he said if you could come back and we'll do an audition withthe band and his words were a proper audition, Messag sure. The next thinghe says- and you know in the most Neil diamond voice-was you know, we'll send you the material and will give you time to dohomework and, of course, we'll pay you for your hoork. Thank you. I give him acopy in my book 'cause, I figure I'm never going to see him again. Anyway. Imean I walk out the door and I'm thinkingwell, if nothing else I'll come back here and meet these guys and maybe I'llmake three hundred bucks. For My, you know for my homework right, righ,that's a good man! Im, I'm fine they'll know me they'll! Think I'm a good guy.I won't get the GIG, but you know some big name I'll, get it rigt Um. So Ipick up my girlfriend at work. We go home to my little apartment at the timeI in the valley and the phone rings, and it's Sam, the mysthical magical Sam. I say to the girls who, sa to mygirlfriend and her daughter said: Look just look at the Chinese food menu,we'll order some food for dinner, I'm going to walk down the hall in mylittle apartment and take this phone call. So this is what Sam says. First of all bill really appreciate itcoming down on short notice. I know it was kind of a strange way to audition I'm thinkingwell, this doesn't sound good all at all and I said yeah I understandSA. Thank you. Thank you for the opportunity, I'm saying all the rightthings M. I'm reading down the script of right things to say when you don'thave the Gig Rigtrigt, you know as you're being as you're being told youknow you did really well right, Um and I'm saying things like no, I was justhappy to be there and you know it was great to meet the guy. So Sam says these words. Well, we understand that this is you know.Extraordinary circumstances come in with no charts and kind of under a lotof pressure, but anyway Neil loved what he heard, and he wanted to invite you to be the baseplayer on this promotional tour that we're doing- and I said, wow great.When do we go and he said we leave on Sunday, and this was Wednesday and or Tuesday rather wew, and I sa d. no,maybe it was Wednesday and I said Oh and he said: Do you need some time tolook at your calendar now. This is one of my great lines. Oh boy, I said Yeah. Let me look at mymillennium at a glance. No, I don't think I'm doing anything for the nextthousand years. That would preclude me and he just went okay and W oh come on.That was that was a good one, but Um. So I said what what dol we do now andhe said well, come in tomorrow, fillout some forms get measured for a shirtwell and then I came back the next day, which is Thursday and sat with theguitar player and ran through. I don't know a dozen songs. Some ofwhich I knew and which was funny 'cause when I metNeil that first day, you know he said,...

...for instance, you know I am, I said,are you familiar with that song? Have you heard the song- and I said Yes because I live on this planet? Isthere anybody who does ecause Im, not tesoi kind of had to lab at myself?With some of my answers? I don't I don't know why I got the Gig R M. I didone rehearsal and these were not full shows. This was a promotour. We weredoing television shows, so we do two or three songs, but one of the things wedid was- and I didn't know this e, because we didn't ev had time to talkabout an itineary. We did the London Palladium and we did a one hour or an hour and ahalf special called one night only which is still you know. I see it ontelevision, it wil and it's brilliant. I mean you know it's great and Iremember being on stage saying Oky. This is the London Palladium. The picture of the old Marvin Gay liverecord. Is Him standing on that the next day we go over to the BBC and I'mstanding there thinking? This is where the stones, the Beatles and the LondonPhiharmonic r. You know the London Sompany all played in this room right,and I realize that that's what happens on a neil diamond tour. Everything youdo is three times bigger than right. You know, then you thought it'sand my my two, my two, the two gems you know in my ground, so to speak. Since Iwas a little kid, I'm a New Yorker, Madisonsquare Garden, yes right and theother one was the Hollywood bowl because I had never been to California.I just used to look at that in magazines a and I got to play both ofthem a couple of times, so there was really nothing about theNeildiamond experience that was anything less than stellar forme Um and it h it was an interesting four years,wir three and a half years that I did it you know Niil has since retired. I did actually get to record with him.I'm on to of the records yeah, I'm on a Christmas record and I'm on the he dida box set like a fiftieth anniversary and Anhe. One of the things he reallywanted to do was kindo drag a couple of these old songs out of moth balls thathe never really finished. Oh interesting and I did a couple andplayed- and there was no clicktrack for those af yew. That might not be awareof this. You know you record to a click track and then you take the click track off.So you you know the band is playing live. Well, there was no click trek, soit was a different environment for those of Yow that were understandin.What I'm saying, because there were literally it was tape from nineteen eighty two or something syou're playing too previously recorded yeah, yeah, sothey kind of pulled outof the vault wow. So there is nothing about the neal experience that was bad.For me, I mean there's great stories, great stories about rehearsals greatstories about dinner. You know it wasn't just oh Lo, we played all theseplaces. It was. It was every every day was just a great experience. Oh that'sso cool. I love hearing that Yel no ere's, not every GIG, its like th hell.I've done the other one yeah a matter of fact. Just to bridgethese two things together, I have tored the United States playing radio shows, meaning just doingradio shows four and five a day, driving two hundred and fifty miles Ri.You know starting at six o'clock in the morning and ending at you know: seveno'clock at night, Rigti've done Blues Clubs and festivals and Rodeos, and andwhat we used to laugh at is Y. Obviously, when you work with Noldiamond, you don't stay at the Motel six rigt and you don't play the localtheater, which would have been the great gig sx months before that rigd inMin Lat. I was playing the you know whatever it is. You know the archao theatre after wow. This is greatand I drive past that and go to the United Center and Shaganothe act of the arena. So we had we had these running jokes with the band wherethe guys in the Boundago. Oh, you know, there's a there's a great little placefor breakfast over here and you know we' be in the Midde of nowhere. Youknow Topika, Kansas or and I'd say: Oh Yeah, the Blueberg. You know theBluebird cafe or something go yeah. How do you know about that? Have you playedyou know the United Center before and I go? No, I played around the corner. Yousee that horrible Little Blues Club, that's where I play that's where I knowwhere the restaurant is y. You guys are used to this tff so know the feelingfor sure. Oh absolutely yeah the first time I sort of first time I went back toDenver and played fiddlers green. You guys playd, that, like an outdoor, Idon't even av this called anymore, but big outdoor shed yeah and I'm on a tourbus and I just bawled o know just pulling into town I'm just like I I did it. You know. Somehow I did it.You know Um, it's interesting, you know. When Y, U,when you realize Um, I mean you- and I are our most modest- have to say: We've accomplishedsomething yeah, you know you can't be afraid to say that, because when yousee some of the places we have played...

...and we'll play no shame and there's no knocking at,but now you do have to look at it and go. I got a couple of feathers in mycap and this was worth whether it was going to school or working those twojobs. You know where I was mopping a floor and then running out and doing aGIG. I it it was. It was a culmination to it that worked out. Okay, yeah, youknow yeah absolutely and that's a part that they can't take away from you. Youknow like I could run out of gigs tomorrow, which you know I mean we'rewe're in the midst of a pretty scary time. You know this could all go awaytomorrow, but you can't change the fact that I I did this I played there. Youknow I think, as musicians. Those were our metals. You know, even if they're,just memories yeah, you know Hore, I have you know. Probably everyone has apile of backstage passes. I have them spread all over the place. Ye oit's,absolutely funny that you say that, because I have so many things that Um. If you look at the Laminetm, you K owwhat we call ammies, you know, sometimoook you look at Ilami and t'llsay Um. I don't know the Ro Andoak BluesFestival to the casual passer by looks at thatand goes wow. You must have played to twenty thousand people. No, I played toseven people Yo. I played the seven people thatstill that stode on a haystack for a couple of minutes, and that was aboutit so getting to like back to neal down for just a second like so he's amusician, and so is he pretty particular about Um the parts thatyou're playing and is he involved with all that? Is there a musical directorthat handles that or you know when I was there um or was he I should Sayiye?Well, he he's it's kind of a it's kind of aroundabout question, because the first thing they said to me when I got theGig was this Neil knows what he wants to hear and, more importantly, he knowswhat he doesn't want mm right now for a guy. Like me, that was great newsbecause again, if somebody hands me at Thart and says just play this well, I'mI had to memorize the whole show that's Whay D. I memorized every note right Mand it's you know forty five songs or something and I memorous every nown.But what would happen would be this M if, if it's okay for me to kind ofgive, you know a little shot out to my bandmates 'cause, they just ae ltegreatest peop, I mean everybody in the band was kind of a legend m. The DRUMMAwas Rontut Rontat from Elvis. If nothing else sorrontat played on Moorehits, I won't even go into his resume. 'CAUSE we'll go too long, but ri playedon with everybody Um the background. Singers are my favoritepeople in the world. Maxine and Julia waters have done everything from Gontafly now from rocky the theme from soul train just everything all the way up toyou know Adele just a couple of years ago, so not n, not like you know, stopworking and they are just the most beautifulpeople in the world. I love them dearly and I I keep in touch with them to thisday. So here's all these kind of people on stage right and neal would um would just say something like you knowthat second verse, let's Ah, let's give it a breath before I come back and singnow, if you're reading, what that means is it's thirteen bars or seven somethingweird m and a person who might be a little too musical for his own good. Atthat point, your initial responses. Well, no, that means we're ending on ag sharp and we need to get back right. Okay. I can't really explain this, butI witnessed it a hundred times. Neil would say something like you know: let's just give it a little breath,because I want the audience a chance to respond mm now. Neildiamond saying hewants the audience to respond. That's essentially to me is like Joe Montana, telling you how tor listen to Joe Montana. You want to win a football game. You know yes, sowe would all just kind o we got into the habit of going okay, Meel as sureas we're sitting here that night we would come out. We'd play the song and we'd hold forthat extra two bars whatever that supposedly weird thing is Neil would put his hand up and waved tothe audience and get a standing ovision. He knew that he needed that breath toacknowledge the audience to acknowledge the ban. Whatever it was, he had, it was the magic touch. I Icouldn't explain it. You'd have to see it. You just have tosee it, so I would play out a little bit. I would play you know not notoverplay, but I play a couple of things and Um. I had to immediately get out of thehabit of saying I was ot. Ok, you know right because he would just they say.No, no, he he'll tell you if he doesn't like it Um, so I just did probably ninety percent of thescript so to speak. You know what they had been playing and then I'd add alittle something and if nobody threw something at me, it was good yeah,that's kind of the way I look at it. Yeah there's a lot lot of artists thatare the same wags. They only talk to...

...you and you're doing something wrong. MMUSICALLY ANYWAYS! I remember youtelling me a great story about that. I don't want to embarrass you again. HgoAhead. I won't mention the artist I'll, let you because if it's something ag l, you said that there was one particularpassage that you were playing and you kind of blew it and you knew youblew it. Obviously you didn't need somebody in the musical director itsomething like only play what you can play. You just play what you can. It was like my first past and I'm likeI just trying stuff you know like he's like. Oh Yoonto, do something: okay,okay, right yeawell that was CAZIMO, sell sae. He was a tricky dude, BillianALN, but also Japanese they're, very direct people. Yeah, you know they're, you know we used to do over there a lotand- and I I had to teach the backstage director to say please, because usualys just like stand by and is like who you think you're talking to Y, I stand by. Please Yo know you know benice man, you know, but you know you learn to love it after a while, becausethey're not Gong to be dishonest, you ow everything that they're thinking iscoming right out or it's after a while once you get used to it, but you knowyou probably told me that story. Fifteen years ago I promise you. Iremember it. I told you I can memorize a show of forty five years. I rememberaverything, you ever said. Well now, no I'm nervous. Oh, youshould be well Y ow along those lines just tokind of tie these things together. You know, I I take great pride in knowingwhat I can do and what I can' do mm M. I have never. This is not me being.This is not false modesty on my part. I've never been a chops guy. I nevertook lessons I never so I just I'm kind of a heart and sold guy and you knowkind of a rock RN B Guy, I'm I'm not a jazz guy. I I'm not flashy and one timein a rehearsal. I did a little slap now I it's it's probably what I do worse.Okay, playing left Handad, an upside down just the tecnical in ofit isdeared and tit's, just not my thing, but I was kind of of all things. My Great Buddy Rontut, the drummer saysto me. You should do that and I said Ron Ron who's played withevery great base player and I went not really my thing on the new guy and hejust said. I think I think meal would like that.So we used to do the Song Cherry Cherry N and everybody would take a sola in a rehearsal and I have the recordingof the rehersal, which I'll probably have it buried with me. I did my little version of a slappthing. All of our great baseplayer friends,you included, will listen to it and go wow. That's not exactly accurate. Wasn't my best performance neal and therehearsal goes wow billy, I didn't know you could do that, so I would do it on stage mnow again.This is really not about me. It's about Neal's, ear and his connection with theaudience yeah, my five friends that are sitting in the audience. AGONE Birl. Idon't know if Iwould have done, that the other nineteen thousand peopleloved it a 'cause. It was just you know something just a little different, so I always prid myself on keeping theparameters pretty tight like no. I would never do that in a lot of otherinstances, but this one just called for it. So I kind of felt like you know there ware those actors thatthey'rethey're a great Shakespeareian actor and they just they just want togo on stage and do a little comedy. 'cause they've never done it before andyou know t R kindo looking like. I don't know how well I'm going to dowith this, but I'm going to just push it. You know that's how I felt Itashere. I am in front of all these people and I'm in a start trying to play like Eric beanes and itmight not work out as well as so that was fun. I have to confess something I I lovebooks, but I I don't love reading and it it's been something that I've I'vewrestled with. Since I was a kid you kN W, I can read. I have red books butthey're very time consuming, and I've spent most of my time trying to build amusic career which takes a lot of time. But one thing I definitely do a lot ofis drive in L, a traffic on my way to a GIG and there's a solution thatcombines those two situations and that's called audible. Dotcom. Otto hasthousands of audiobook titles and you can listen offline anywhere anytime.The APP is free and can be installed on all smartphones and tablets, and theyhave just a ton of music related titles, like all you need to know about themusic business by Donalis, passman, Ow, music works by David Byrn or musicproduction secrets by Calvin Carter, and you can get a free thirty day trialright now, if you visit, audible, trial,...

...dotcom, slash, dive bar rock star,that's audible, trial, dotcom, slash dive Bar rock star, I'd like to take a second to thank youfor listening to the diebar rocks our podcast as a new pod cast getting theword out as a vital part of what it takes to keep the show on the road or off the road has their current case.Maybe if you would like to support the bodgast all you got to do subscribewherever you listen, and if you have an extra minute or two neese leave areview, you can also share and follow the podgast onyour social media APS. Okay enough begging, I hope you'rehaving fun and once again thank you for listening. You know this. This gig kind of camelate in your life. You know and Verl. That must make you appreciate it more.Do you think if this came younger in your life, you would you'd be able to'cause. It seems like you're, a person who really is soaking in every minuteof it r. It was you know when it was touring an and being able to appreciateit for what it is. If that had come in your twenties, you' think it would ave.I'm almost sure I wouldn't have appreciated it as m as much because I have a couple of those reallypoignant moments that they weren't they weren't huge in any other respect.Other than I remember when I was in New York, I used oplay granted village allthe time, which is the Mecca of of music rant and again I won't mentionnames, but there was a guy that I knew a drummerwho got one of the biggest gigs with one of the big pop stars of theEighties Right M um in the middle of the tour. They come home for a littlewhile or the touris over. I forget exactly what the thing was and there Iam on Bleaker Street, and I see this guy. I didn't know him well, but HeyLouis. How is the tour- and he says to me great- you got a Gig for me- H firstwords out of his mouth because that tours over you have no promise of anything else.The Star made thirty million dollars theyre in no rush to go back. You havebeen making a decent living, but now all your contacts, dried up, you don'thave any club Gig. You can't come home and just jump into those club, gigs andreally club gigs pay what they pay. So you can't say: Hey I'm demanding moremoney right, there's, no more money to have right, so I've always been. I heldon to that- and I remember thinking when I get my shot, I'm going to holdont to it with both hands, I'm goint, to make myself indispensable to thesepeople and I'm going to make sure that I have a ball. I'm going to be the mostgracious rock star, you've ever seen in your life, and I really followed up on that. I was theguy out there taking pictures signing autographs. You know because I I justfelt like well. No, I I waited a long time to get here. Yeah,I I'm going to make everything count and when it's time to go I'll go, but it um hitting being able to tour the world firstclass yeah with one of the greatest singer songwriters in history. When Iwas fifty five and fifty nine years, Oldmm was amazing, yeah amazing! Youknow, and I could never ever think him. I I speak to him once in a while. Ihave spoken to him. I should say you know over the last couple of years andI at the risk of getting too emotionalhere, but I honestly said to him. I said Neil. I will tell you this. If, before I die, I hit the home run in the seventh gameof the World Series, walk on the moon and become presidentof the United States on my tombstone, it's still going to say Neil Diamond'sBaseplayer, as I wouldn't really care about those other things as much asthis, and I do honestly feel that way. It changed my life andthat's, so great,yeah, wow. Well God for you, man, when Iheard you got the Gig like no matter what you think you just tsaid in yourstory that you're not the guy for this Gig, but is when I heard that you gotmy media thought was that's perfect. This is a Gog. This is a perfect, I'm just so happy about it. Yo knowwhat I mean and a lot. You Know Lot of times you hear about guys getting gigsand you're like H, Jeez. Why did I get that GITR wwing? What's that? That'snot the RI. This was like perfect W. Thank you. No. I mean it's interesting.'CAUSE, like I said you know, you've done some cool gigs I mean you know.WITE YOLKEM is a pretty, is a pretty good gig Um ye the kicomasuigig was agreat gi. You know it was a different kind of ging. Yeah you've played with a bunch of myfriends that I know from all different areas: Nd all in all the differentbands you know, and- and so I I always kind of kept tabs on what you weredoing, because it was a great thing because it was it's a great feeling forme, probably for you too, if I'm driving on sunset, if I'mdriving down Broadway in New York City...

...or if I'm driving down the Vega Strip,it's great to look at the billboard to go wow shul, I a twain, Hey, that's ourbuddy dereck, frank who is on Yor. You know rate baseplayer great to you know,O Oh wit, Yokoms playng over there, oh yeah, that's my bodyeric! Maybe I'LL!Stop in. I don't care, Fou free tickets. Let's, let's go grab a burger. You knowyeah, it's almost like the community. The musmen Hemunity at that level is sois so tight an and you know, and so so so giving yeah that everybody'shappy to seef everybody's having to see somebody go up the line. Well, I thinkyou nailed it earlier too, and it's like it's more than just being a greatplayer. You you've got to be a decent human being to like be ontour withpeople you're moving in you know, you're you're, essentially a roommateas well over the sometimes the worst of circumstance. You know you got to be beable to roll with the punches and be a cool nice person. So when you get tocertain level most guys are nice guys yeah when it comes to musicians, yeah,I'm hertest, woknow, that's a Dir thing, but definitely ye H. I mean my my my critohas always been I'm not a great musician, but I do a great job you know.So again I mean I M, I'm a pretty cocky son of a bitch about what I wa. I thinkyou're selling yourself way short by the way foot well, but T it's arefreshing attitude to hear. Well, I mean you know I I kind of live and dieby my ears and not my fingers. There are guys that can play, I mean, go tothe NAM show and I just watch these guys. I watch you too Bun. I see these twelveyear old kid. Oh my goodness. I would never be that and I never will be thatso I make it up. Hopefully in other ways you know, but um it's a bit likelosing one cense. You know if you, your eyesight, starts to dim. Probablyyou're hearing gets a little better. That kind of stuff Righti just lookedat it. Well, if I'm not GONT, if I'm not going to be the chops guy who canread and play everything, I'm Goingnao have to be the heart and sole guy. Ihave to be the Nice Guy, maybe I'll be the funny guy yeah I'll, be the guythat keeps everybody light n, hocel lobby or in the airport, while waitingyou noright, Um, ialso ha a great voice. You're. Also singing base player, whichUm did you sing the NEL dimostuff or no. They actually m told me right away.They they really didn't need me. We had maxine and Julia water singing. Sothat's Kindo, like that's that you wer Irno were good yeah, but that's another great. You knowcombination, there's, not a lot of good singing base players. Honestly, even inLa you know, there's there's a handful forsure, but that's such a awesome. Italmost makes up for okay, I don't play upright or you knowI don't do this or that you know cause. I sing as well, so O well, th! That's enough! You know what I meanlike that's a pretty amazing thing and that now you're filling two chairs withone guy y and and and the fact that you seeing makes your base playing moremusical. You know, and sometimes that's what's needed. Yeah I mean again. I I Ilove cross reference in your other shows 'cause, I'm a big Fan of yourshow and congratulations on e O. Thank you. You know we talk about singingbase players for these last. However long it's been.If someone calls me- and I can't do it, my two recommendations or Eric Banes Jennifer Oberley Ho- is my dear friendright. She things like a bird she's, wonderful, she plays Um and therearen't an awful lot of people. Rightwhich is where you e get into thatsticky part ecause. You Go, there's disgy's a great baselayer, but hedoesn't sing May and I can't sub for him. If he's doing someing jazz geting somefusion GIG, where they're reading, I'm not the Guy Right, you know I wouldI'll give you that one, but that's not M, I'm the guy wh. What my biggeststrength is honestly is like the club Gig, the wedding Gig,where you have to know a million Song Right and O. Oh, my God, the you knowthe base player got stuck. He got two flat tires: Yeah Imean at the lastminute, no rehearsal, no one has to yell out a key I'll sing, the highharmony, the low harmony. I know a million songs, that's my strength. Youknow just keep me in keep me in my wheelhouse and we'll be Fune, butthat's great to know about yourself too. You know and a lot of guys. You know Iwas just reading a base player about lease clar and Heis doing an interview,and you know I'd love to have him on the show. So I could actually ask himabout of it. He said T he doesn't play with a pick. He doesn't slap and pop.You know he's one of the most most recorded baseplayers of all time knowlegendary dude, but he's another guy. That's just this is what I do, and thisis what you hire me for and and that's important you know it's odd. Well, I Iwon't say odd, but of all people for you to mention Um Leland's Clar is yeahone of the most recorded guys, funniest guys. If you know him, I've met, I onceyeah. Well we're we're. You know we're I'll, say we're pseudo friends in thesense that we don't hang out together, but we certainly know each other andwhen I first got the GIG with neal a couple of the guys in theband unbeknownc to me called Leeland and said: Hey do youknow this guy bill, Sinke d and Lei...

...said yeah and they say well. You knowit looks like he's going to be the guy and Lelan love. You thank. You said. Ohno bill's GOINGTO fit right inright. So, couple of months later I go to this Christmas show that PeterAsher was involved with yeah. A bunch of great players was judithough and F YOu knowkown Yeah I've been to that show as well may we were even there. We ritwe actually where Wewere yeah, we weare 'cause Ihad, just DOD Agig with JeerGeofrey Ellen Ross, and he was playing yeah witpeter exactly Jefarsh. My Myworkwife Leland is on stage Kindo chewhing up got off the stage, ran into theaudience and gave me a hug a Wen built mat. We heard about the Meil Gig TomHansley, the keyboard player, the longtime keeper player said. I spoke toTom and I said Yeah. Everybody was really happy with you. I said Leav man,that is just the greatest thing: 'cause here's theres room, two hundred andfifty people, three hundred people all turng around saying who's, the guy withthe Pony Tal. That knows Lieland squark. This woman sitting next to me says: Oh apparently, youwere playing with MelDimond. Congratulations and I said well. Let me tell you that guy right thereLee, I said I should probably send him a royalty check. AUSE I've stolen everylicqhes ever play and the woman says. Ah Yeah he's agreat guy. I said: Oh, do you know im she says yeah, I'm his wife think I didn't say somethinge exactly I subbed for you on. I think it wat youor JEN. I think you were both kindof doing the Peter ash yea, and so I upfor somebody and Um and it was the pers Om. I had done it,and so I went to Jefoferlan Ross's house he's Aonal Oldan instrumentoussinger. It was a bad finger, yeaher really amazing voice, you kN W and everythingabout Hem, but anyway Um, and he had mentioned that yeah. We called Lis glarand he couldn't do it and I was like wow, I'm goin to list the blease clar.You know like if I've done nothing else, you know it my life and I'm on that list. Okay, I'm somebody,but it's good that you can say that, though, because you know, I think a lotof people would might look at you and just go well. Obviously, Withdoi Yokemyou're doing some. You know you're doing some pretty big gigs here, right kind of with the presumption that youran out of itols right that you don't look to somebody hat, that you don'tput on Rickor and go my goodness what a great record you know from somebodyelse, and I always kind of Giggle at that, because we all have those people. You just go man. I saw this show at you know at the staple center, but I can't waitto go to that Little Jazz Club in Glendale and see that drummer causethis guy. I'm going to sit there in a room with thirteen people, but this guyis killing it yeah. We all have idols and people that we look up to ran. When I see those guys, I'm a little kid, I'm not too cool tobe a fan. I'm I'm like T, I'm like the the teenage girls in the front row atShay Stadium with the beetles, I'm just sitting there and I'm mesmerized Ye,and I I think some people kind of leap frog over that. They think. No, youprobably don't feel that way anymore. Go No, I'm probably feeling more likeit so m. You mentioned that you're, a lefthanded base player and I wan totalk about that for a second, because to me, there's Kot of three ways: Youcan do it. You can just learn to play right handed or you can turn it overand restring it and put the you know the ltleow strings on top Ero can dowhat you did and other guys have done, just turned it over so wha. What wasthe Empetis for that? Why esenall? There are three ways to do it. Thethird one is the most impractical and the most expensive and the mostridiculous. So if that gives you any indication of what's going on in myhead, you know it's probably the same storyas a lot of other people. I was a little kid I mentioned my old brotherSteve had a guitar mm, he went into the service and I picked up the guitar when I wasdon't know seven or eight. You Know Kong, Kong KLUNK. I do remember thispart. It always gets a laugh. I remember the first thing if youremember the Song Great Song by the stones, paint it black there's kind ofa Dron citar down down down down in. I somehow learned to kind of slop around with that lick and that's all I played I didn't knowany cords. I didn't know any notes. I was playing that I was eight years old.Who cares right right, UM, one of my friends or you know one of myfriend's older brothers, someone who's old enough to realize said. You know you everything about what you're doing iswrong. You should flip the guitar over and play right, handed or, and myhonest response was. I readly learned how to play paint inblack. We I'm not turninging back now. I had no idea that there were fortyfive years ahead of me that I would be playing. You know professionally wowand I just kept going and I didn't play for a little while and then I played alittle bit and Um.

I was playing guitar for a while and, as I like to say, I was you know I came from the school where you makeas much noise as possible, so I would play in an acoustic duo which I love Hm.All the other acoustic duels were playing nil, young Cat Stevens.Whatever in the seventies, I was in a duel that we were doing likehollenoates and skevy. Wonder and Chicago like Wewe were reimagining songs beforereimagining was a term and I loved everything about it. Because what wouldhappen? I can pick up your right hand, thenGatar and just slip it upside down MHM. So if you and I were playing as a doer,which maybe we should do sometime mhm when you're playing an e and I'mplaying in e, it sounds different. It's almost like a piano cord, my majorseventh ar different fingering. I do weird stuff yeah, it's just a differenttonality. You know andting, so it we developed this thing and so essentiallywhat happened was. I became the guy that it wasn't that I was a greatguitar player, but Peopl went oh yeah, the left handThao Saanguy yeah. That was that was kind of my claim to fam. You know somepeople had a Mohawk. You could see that from fifty yardsaway. Well, I the left, handed upside alghe and, and it kind of became my um my tag, my Monicar r. So I didn't, I don't recommend it to anybody. I have to have all myguitars, reworked and cusuomized. Either I have to buy 'em from thefactory interesting. I go to a guitar store. I play the right handed modeland then order the left handed model and have it all switche. So you have tochange the nut. You noo change the saddle. You have to change the pickups,the angle of the pickups wit's, not a simple thing and uh somesome Lutheas love me because theygo wow. This is something different. 'cause. I've never done this beforeandother Guy Ha hate me. They just go. Why? Why are you doing this t and Iguess pen, here's designing this base. Yes, Ot got to undesign it all. Let's talk about your book Ye. It'salmost you brought me one, which is es ophysical book 'cause. I I've had it vor years on my phone, you K I'm a fan aswell. I appreciate that Um, but it it seems to be come kind of acalling card. You know for you how many books do you bring with you on UN onirregular journey throughout the day I havehonestly, I always have a couple inthe car. I call it the most expensive businesscard I've ever had because I really didn't sell a lot of books, but it was the best investment I evermade. behause again I was the guy with the Book Right Ray, so you went inaudition fifty people. Oh, the left own, the guy with the book yeah. The bookwas funny Aski. Let's give him a call, rigt n. It is it's a hilarious book.It's really great! Thank you. It's a lot of it's just stories from from yourlife. You know N N in lessons and and how long did it take to write it Umbesides a whole lifetime yeah? Well, you know it was an interesting thing m.When I first started writing it. I think I wrote Oh, I think it wasabout eighty pages in two months and I thought well. This is going to be theesy thing I've ever done in my Lifei spoke to another author, not a musicianand the guy said to me. You know there's something about a book that ifyou really do it from your heart, it's probably going to take you five years,and I said: Oh No, you don't know what you're talkingabout, because Iam the smartest man in the world right I've written eightypages in two months, which means I can write a hundred and sixty in fourmonths, and this will go. You know and w Thi thisill be a piece of cake. It'sfive years wow, it didn't. Take me five years of struggle. It took me twomonths to write eighty pages and then I did nothing for four years reallynothing. I couldn't even tell you why. I don'tknow if it was rider's block or I just forgot about it or I don't know whatand then at a certain point, I sat down and started reading what I you knowrevisiting mm and I I honestly was reading it through theeyes of maybe the casual observer. As opposed to the author and I was reading-and I said you know, I actually have a voice here and that's a weird thing tounderstand. As a writer mm I'm actually this sounds like me. This sounds theway I talk. It's got attitude. It's got some bluster M, some of it's funny andsome of it is you know. I know that we're not on camera, but when I put myhands kind of like pay, listen up like MHM, I kindo Hade t e some of thatattitude. where, like okay, you know, we told a couple of jokes, I told acouple of funny stories: Let's get down to business, you have to practice and Idon't want to hear about marketing schemes or the girl wearing the shortskirt or the guys saying hey. If I get tattoos, no forget that sit down andpractice, you know I found that I had...

...this voice and, as I was reading it Isaid I need to get back to this well in those next, maybe three months Icranked out two hundred pages I rolled out of bed and didn't even splash water.On my face, I rolled aut a bit at six in the morning and sumbled into theother room and started. I was writing my my fingers couldn't keep up with mybrain wl and Um. It was a brilliant experience. It really was the mostenlightening invigorating h at the same time, meditative and energizing. It was because it's your heart and salt,and when I was talking to that friend of mine who was actually like, he wasan author. He was a lawyer and wrote some legal book and he said No, youknow what happened Um. Some of it was just text and facts and figures, butwhen I got into writing from my heart it was easier, but it took a long timeto get there. You know y rig idnt. I you con't have to develop that exactly'cause. You had to find that voice. You had to find. If I'm just writing numbers. Well, THAT'S U'M! You know th,that's easyso! It took me that long, but essentially it took me five yearswith a four and a half year gap. kind of thing that sense. The book is calledthe Amazing Adventures of a marginally successful musician. Now that you'reyou're, clearly not marginally successful, you're you're like a legitsuccessful. You know musician, not that you weren't before you know it's it'sall in just but Um. How does that change? The way that youview the book an and would you have written anything different woling thatI don't know knowing that this was coming or h, You'e written now, I'msure I would have done a lot of things. DIFFEREN! A matter of fact, Um people have been asking me aboutwriting a sequel forever and and Um my really the meal Diamond Fan Club. They they send me notes every day andthey really do thee the greatest fans in the world thatand. The the thing forme was this Um. If you were to make the movie analogy,what's the most standard line, the most standed line is well, the movie wasn'tbad, but it wasn't a good as wasn't as good as the book Ihand. Then, when yougo further things that have sequels, I wasn't asgood as the original. It was cool. They had bigger stars Bu, there was moregraphics tha, you know the car chase, but that original story- I don't knowyou, know Thaanthhm. It makes you a little gunshy to kind of reboot my own book and go oh.I actually started writing a sequel and what I did was- and here is, if there's a red flashing light and asiren that will indicate to the listeners that here comes some more shameless self promotion. On my part, I have a special, a special soundeffecteno. He other it'll, probably be the sound of athousand people groaning her. He goes again. I did something recently calledthe groove program, which is my own program that it's like an online masterclass. It's an extension of the book and what I did was M. it's all video,but one of the things I did was I added some written chapters. I didn't want to try to do two hundredpages, so what I did was, I would do something about recording and at the end of the video chapter Iwould put a written chapter of two pages. I did another one on touring andsaid essentially, look not everybody's going to tour with the White Yoke. Um,not everybody's, going to to it neel diamond, not everybody's, going to tour on that level m. But there's a lot of things. You couldlearn about doing the Vantor, which I've done a thousand Vantos, I loved it,my dead, you know it just couldn't Um couldn't get enough of it, and I wasyou know I would break it down and put some of it in writing, and so I thoughtthat was my way of kind of paying a little omage so to speak to my own bookwithout writing an entire other book right. So I made references to some ofthe things that have happened to me since ND. That's Great Yeah! It's it'sbeen a lot of fun. I mean it's a bit of a reinvention you've been also doingpublic speaking yeah. So did the book sort of lead to that or open doors forthat it did and isn't the groove programkind of all, it's tied up with the public speaking as well D. Yes, that'sall! Apparently you have done your research yeah. This is all tiedtogether and essentially lying in wait until the earth perjures itself Rom.You know from the thing that we have m I'm waiting patiently. You know I'm notI'm not pushing anything but fear of public speaking is the number one fearthat people have right. I've heard that and Jerry Seinfeld as a bit about thenumber one fear is public. Speaking e number two fear is death. HOWILL,actually fear public speaking more tha death, which means the Mor Guy Givingthe eulogy would rather be in the casket. That's itso public speaking.Just never scared me M, I I enjoyed it and I'm okay with heckling. You know'cause 'cause, it's the Bargig right...

Rightl there you have it I'm naked. Infact, I think the first time I heard come for the music stay for the comedyt was from you probably on stage at the braselve Yeah H, because you know thedrunk would say something and they rested a band. Oh and O Y. I'm up forthis one. You know- and I would tatoo the guy verbally so me doing. The public speaking thingwas one of the greatest experiences and you know when you referenced earlierwhen you pulled into like one of the big Yo Kothe big, shed yeright, and yousaid you rit honestly brought you to tears. Yeah Um, I'm going to try totell the story without crying day. Well, it's been said on aother pocket on theBarba Walters of podcaos Ait Yo, I um I went to Nashville. I Love Nashville.I've been there on and off for years, so I did a series of public speakingsome s. You know some were kind of smaller. Nothing was big, but one ofthe things was at Tennessee State University. It wasn't like a bigtheater or anything. It was two music classes together. So I don't know fortyfifty people they're all young they'were, all nineteen and twentyyears old MM. So the professor introduces me nobody claps, it's notlike, Ladies and Gentlemen, an people you know Ar 's a bunch of kids lookingat me. So I started talking and I started out t I guess the word would beprofesorial right. I'm trying to seeld like a professor 'cause. I'm in schoolthat lasted about thirty seconds 'cause I realize that's not me and they're,not digging US Frad, so guys are looking at their laptops. People arekind of chewing gum looking out to the side and I realized right away. I knowI can do this. So what I did was this. I um I took a breath and I justdiscarded everything I was going to sae and I said anybody known endorsements are endorsements. Is when companies giveyou free stuff. I had everybody's attention. I really did this. Guy has his laptopand I see there's a bumper sticker on his laptop that says vic firth nowagain for those of you VI furth as a a drumstick Comfr, and I said, and thisguyis not really listening, and I said so, for instance, you know if you're adrummer and you need sticks well, sticks get expensive, don't they and helooks up. I said you play your car Drit, you get an endorsement, they send. Yousticks, they send you strings. Now. I have everybody's attention right and Irealize I'm talking to nineteen year olds. Twelve bucks mean something righ.You know for sure these guys are college cats nowless, so we're talkingand all of a sudden, I'm not looking at a clock. You know the professor comesover and says: Look everybody Um we're kind o running out of time, butthis room is empty. So those of you that want to hang out if you haveanother class, go head, but those are Ho want to hang out hang out well outof forty two thirty five stayed ight. We stay another hour now, I'm in twohours, I'm done with two hours. Another professor walks in and says: Look Ah weneed the room and the room next door is also taken, but these kids don't wantto leave. Do you want to just hang out in the hall and talk to him? I stoodout in the hall and I said I'm going to tell you guys right now. I will staytill every last. One of you has asked your questions and if I don't have theanswer I'll tell you how to get them. This one guy, who had kind of a a a Latin accent, is talking to me andhe's saying things like bill. You can't imagine the my heart is swelling because youyou speak with such passion and your love for music and he's being verypoetic, and very so we're now into two and a half hoursthat I was supposed to be there for forty five minutes. Some of the otherkids who went to class now came back and are standing in the hallway with meand I'm thinking am I now being a distraction because hes g that to gosrome place. Professor number three comes over and says bill if you're notdoing anything, I'd love to take you out to lunch. I said sure he says thisyoung man with the accent is my son. He said I've never seen him so excited.Okay, I'm flipping out 'cause, I'm thinking, I'm the guy who walked in andand went from, trying to sound educated and trying to sound lofty, and I smeyou know I forget this, I'm just going to be me. I'm just going to talk the way I talk,I'm just going to do my thing, so we go outside to the parking lot andyou know kindof like okay. Follow me. I don't even know where I'm going a' mount in the parking lot. I call mygirlfriend in Los Angeles, and I said, Shitl had it go and this is what itsounded like. I went honey these kids, I started crying where I don't knowabout you, but I get to when I get that emotional. I don't even know if there'stears, but I can't even catch my breath. I N I was so moved that they were sotaken that I was communicating like that M. Ihad to sit there for a couple of minutes and compose myself and thendrive, and these guys took me out to...

...lunch. So I'm hoping to go back. Iprobably would have gone back if this last five months had been different andI'm hoping to go. It was one of the most incredibly stirring moments whereI thought I had that Aha moment where you know what, if you told me, I wasgoing to do this three days a week. Yeah, I don't think I'd be disappointedwith life. I think this would be pretty cool so that the public speaking thingit wasn't a big stage. It wasn't a huge audience, but it was a pretty powerfulthing. Yeah. Well Y, U you're, probably goint to be a teacher for a guy who doesn't read and playsouside down and never took a lesson. Well, there's other things to know. I Istarted out teaching a drum line, larching drum Yu. You know right out of high school like in highschool iwaand. Then there came N, I was go. I went to Bergley and I came back.I was teaching m more and then I went to college in Denverformin, andwasstill teaching, and then there came this point where I had to make choiceit was like. Am I going to continue on this path of teaching and stay inschool, a D and and do that or am I going to continue as a baseplayer andtry to make it? You know whatever that is. You know Um and I at some point I just thought.Well, if I don't try, I'm going to regret that forever R um and I couldalways go back to teaching or whatever, but an the meantime. I didn't finish mydegree. You know all the things that would be required to really do it. Youknow, and so as life and time has gone on, it's like this. This base thingtook off, but I don't ever. I'm never sure that I made the right choice,because you know I've stood on stage in front of eighty thousand people andplayed my base and had heard my name called over it and it's never asfulfilling as watching one kid Goa Oyeah, you know yeah, it's a hard thingto explain it's a brilliant thing and the other thing is just the idea of h what we call makingit. So in my days I have played with all these sixties bans, one of whichPeter Asked you who I still work with you Kn, when I can amazing guy look hemup. Oh yeah way too much to talk about, and we t me Jennifer, Jo Orelly talkedy about it. I think, but INCREDIB I played it once and yeah unbelievable.No a matter of fact, I recommended you forecause, I recommended Jennifer whenI got the Neil gig. That was how that whole thing and and I m they were sopleased with both of you, which is yet even another branch of this story,because the idea of sending a great sub makes me feel great and makes me lookbetter as opposed to them. Saying Hey, you can never sum out anymore, exactlyyeah, absolutely well! Thank you. No! No! I E N One of the greatestexperiences, but you know the idea of making it M. I remember playing in LasVegas playing with a a great band Jerry and the pacemakers s. One of thosebands that came over in the sixties, W th again with with the Beatles, and itwas me and Jeff Ross, Jeff Alarosum, so we're doing the sound check and oneof the Road Proov guys who I don't know, they're not traveling with us right,comes over and says wel the bound sounds great. I said. Oh thank you. Youknow D, it goes yeah Y. I know these songs and he kind of laughed and say Iknow these songs 'cause. You know from my parents, 'cause he's a younger guyand I'm laughing, and then he said so. When did you realize you made it and I'm thinking from his perspectivewith all due respect to Jerry and the pacemakers is? Is that really what youcall making it from his perspective? He's like? No, I love Jerry and thepaseamerrcause. I have all the records I've been listening to him since I wasa little kid, my dad. We brought me up on it and what it reminded me of- andthis is a different story, but my very dear friends, h Peter andtina. Theytheir children, are my godchildren. I came over their house one time to visitPeter who was in at the time I guess was: Maybe forty he and his wife andthey have kids that are six and eight years oldthey're on the phone with their dad. Who is sixty five years old in Europe. I walk in the door Peter's on the phonewith his dad and says: Oh Yeah Bill just walk ind he's having dinner withus, and the dad says is that the guy who played with Jerry and thepastemakers Peter Intina say who is Jerry and the pacemakers the dad the grandfather? Essentially inthes scenario, the grandfother says they were the biggest bandn you culd anme. I grew up. I Love Them. Oh, my God. This is so great, I'm the rock star tohim right because I'm playing with you Rin the Pacemakens yeah. In the sametime, in this forty five seconds, they said to me, didn't you do somerecording a couple of weeks ago, and I said Oh yeah yeah. I was fortunateenough. I did you know it was one song, but I played with a great bank calledthe fray yeah to Comn Ei yeah yeah. I did a song with him produced by PeterAsher. Here's the dad on the phone, the sixty five year old, Dow N York, sayingwho's the fray and the forty year old couple a gard. Are you Kiddin me? Wehave all their records, we saw them in concert. I had just that day literallythat day come from the studio again...

...with Peter Asher and Jeffrey Allen Ross.I came right from the studio over there and they said well what were you doingtoday and I said: Well, we were doing this kids this. There was a kid show. Idon't know if it was on Nickelodeon. One of those kind of things at maybewas even streaming M. thes a kids thing called the naked brothers mhmgrandfather on the phone who's, the naked brothers parents whoare the nakedbrothers, the two kids jumping up in they watche it every day. Soin te span of this ninety secondsthat I'm in there with my friend my friend's living room, there's a guythat iave never met eight thousand miles away. Who is one audience theparents who are younger than I am had the second audience rigt andthen the kids and nobody knows each other's music. What you're saying is making it rightis completely different from anybody. You might speak to yeahs they're.Looking at you saying, Oh my goodness, Kickoa Tho, I have all that stuff,theyav smooth Jazzso yeah, which is tnothing. I kindof like about your book.It more focuses on like being a working musician versus being a rock star. It'snot like how to become a rock star. It's like how o you know in a senselike just being able to make your living playing. Music is you've made it.You know on some level, you know you you're on wheher, whatever level it is, ifthat's what you get to do every day and and feed your family and sure hey yourrent, like that's, that's a pretty awesome thing. You know well, look man!This is an hour interview and we're about two hours in so so. Let's do part too. I Si, I knowno, but it's been so awesome. This has been just such a great conversation,you're full of an stories, and I didn't warn you, I said, bring a secondmicrophone I'll wear out the first one. It's true and I knew it and it' it'sit's. It's a roller coaster of emotions.Shortly you know, and just today I was like I'm tired an, but I just knew it.I was like, but I'm not going to have to work that hard tonight. 'CAUSEDonyou know besides us just knowing each other for twenty years, or youknow- and I know that you're full of so many awesome stories and I'm like youknow, I've got four and a half pages and notes, but I'm probably going toneed one I'll come back next year. So thank youfor for providing the energy and the stories and the Awesomeness and r beingsuch a great human and h. You know no matter what you think. I think you're agreat based player, you're, a great singer and you're greatdude, and- and I mean I'm just it's- it's Great Knowin, you nowel right backat you and congratulations on the show 'cause. I truly you know I watch it youW. I mean I listen to it e every time and and Um you're, like the perfect guyfor this and and all of our mutual friends, I'm I'm soproud of all of them for their successes and being able to come outand talk about it. An let's do it again and let's s absolute, let's find areason to get together. Maybe we'll come in this great studio of yours andwrite, something or rouor something or we'll fickur something out. Th Awesome,wet thanksman! I'm waving goodbye to everybody as Wego the man of many stories. That's my newname for bill, but lots of great stuff. The title of this episode is going tobe called. We leave on Sunday because I think that's a really important lessonand it's happened to me and it is kind of a part of being a toring musician.Is that you've got to be able to jump when whenit's when it's time, you've got to jump on those opportunities and I've hadsituations where and I'm sure bill. As in this situation, you know we'reworking musicians, so I've had a situation where it's a big tour. I'vegot a month a rehearsal and two months of touring, which means I now have toget out of my next three months worth of gigs. You know, which is anotherreason it's good to have subs and if you're moving out here, it's great tomeet people that are that play your instruments because they need subs ifthey're touring people. But I've had a lot of a couple of situations withfriends and colleagues, people that have moved out here and want to starttouring, and they tell me this and that's great and then an opportunitycomes up and I call them and say we're leaving in a week and a half and well II can't do that. I got this job and that job and well that's that's most ofthe time how this stuff happens. So you need to keep yourself in a positionwhere you can jump at any point and sometimes you're going to burn bridgesand Someti a lot of times. You're, notbecause everyone understands and and some of these tours are big money andbig opportunities, and if that's, what you want to be people will understand.Sometimes they won't. You know, but that's sort of you gotta, keep your eyeon the ball. You know. The other thing I think is is a goodlesson and bills. A great example of this. He doesn't read, and I talk a lotabout college and the importance of that and that's true, you know it'sgoing to get you just more gigs, but the other alternative is to know amillion songs and there are definitely guys that that are like that and buildsone of them. So you know, if I hand you...

...a book of Charts on a wedding gag orsomething- and you just know, every song- it's that's great, you know, andhe has great ears as well, even if he doesn't quite know how to play a song.R N never play this Ong. Before he's heard it, he knows how it goes, and youknow that's a another viable thing and something you should just have anyways.You got Ta work on your Repertoi and you also have to know repertoir repetoir. I don't know I'm going to look tbet up, but you alsoneed to know whichever town you're living in there's probably Goin, to bea different set of tunes that you know. I know when I first moved out to l a Igot, a gig with a a cover band and they weren't the best and the gigs thatthey were playing weren't the best the money wasn't the best, but they hadtwelve sets of music that they played 'cause. They would do like seven orlike five nights in a row, and I looked at the list and Theye were all thesongs that I was seeing on all these other people's setlists. So I'm, likeyou know for one. I, even though the money was not that much I I had justmoved, I need whatever money I can get, and so I'm Gong to take the GIG forthat. But I'm also going to learn all the songs that I'm going to need forevery other gig in this in the city it seemed like so learn a million songsand make sure you're learning the right ones: Fiddlers Green Amphitheatr, openN, nine Hune nd. Eighty eight in Denver Colorado. I saw many shows there when Iwas a kid. So that's another reason. It was so emotional to be coming back toDenver to play the big venue, but it changed its name in two thousand andten to comfort, dental ampitheatere for three years and it's N. it's now onceagain called fiddlers green ampitheater, so check out a show once they start upagain, and these type of outdoor venues are known to us in the touring Biz assheds. So that's what I was talking about so we mentioned taxi in taxi.Dotcom is an organization that basically finds music for publishers.It's a tipsheet, so you join become a member and you C theyill give you alist of what people are looking for, and you can eit the right music for thelist because usually there's a deadline. That's two or three weeks out or if youhave a catalogue of music, you can submit what you already have, and thenthey have a panel of of judges, basically and they're super qualifiedto make sure that what taxi is passing on is specifically what the publisherswant. So it's a good opportunity for the right writer to get some music place in T V or film oryou can get signed. You know there's sometimes there's labels looking forartists, though anyway check it out taxi dotcom and I really hope youenjoyed thes show wow. You've made it to the end, I'mhoping it's because you completely enjoyed yourself and are now filledwith knowledge and inspiration to move forward with your dreams. If that isthe case, and you would like to standformed it new episodes live eventsand General News. Please go to dive Bar rock star, dtcom and sign up for themilliist. If you have any questions, comments, corrections or complaintsabout anything you hear on the show, please email me at fanmail at Diebar,rocks star Dotcom and you may even end up on the show we at the Dibar RockStar potcast with all of our hearts. Thank you for listening and remember.It's all about dreams.

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