Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
The Dive Bar Rock Star Podcast
The Dive Bar Rock Star Podcast

Episode 18 · 1 year ago

August Zadra- Try To Be More Of A Musician Than A Guitarist (Dennis DeYoung, Waiting For Monday)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Guitarist and vocalist, August Zadra, shares his story of YouTube discovery which lead to him playing guitar and singing with founding member of the band Styx, Dennis DeYoung. He explains how he got from his small town in Alaska to the big city of Los Angeles. He talks about the formation of his current project, Waiting For Monday, and how he started his weekly Facebook Live performances. August also talks about the profound influence Eddie Van Halen had on him and his playing.

Dennis DeYoung, 26 East, Vol.1:

https://open.spotify.com/album/3tu3ITF5KFk6kNSKXU7LAj?si=3QnmUOZDRsGLGcrOqjexTg

Waiting For Monday:

https://open.spotify.com/album/764loqGIi3sdSlSARDkadp?si=0ltEZyxAT9-Mb8W7ydoZ_A

www.divebarrockstar.com

If you are a fan of the dive bar Rockstar podcast and would like to help support the show, there's a great way that you could do that and start a new fashion trend. We have a new merchandise page on the website, which features t shirts and hoodies that are available for sale on Amazon. Just click on merchandise and the top menu and all of the links will be there, or go directly to dive Bar rockstarcom merchandise. Get started early on your Christmas shopping at dive Bar rockstarcom. Welcome to the dive Bar Rockstar podcast, the show exploring the lives of professional musicians of all types, touring musicians, recording artist, songwriters, engineer's bar bands, wedding bands and anyone making their living in the music industry. Whether you've dreamed of being a professional or you already are one, this is the podcast for you. I'm your host, Eric Baines, and I hope that you not only find some entertainment here, but also some helpful tips, trade secrets and ideas that will help you achieve your dreams. Last Friday marked twenty years in Los Angeles for me, so I wanted to just give a shout out and a thank you to all of the amazing musicians and fans and people that I've met here, you know, over the years. It's it's been a unbelievably good decision for me to move here. I think it's really important to find your space in the world kind of, no matter who you are, you know, and California just as seem. As I got here, I just I felt like, oh shoot, I'm home. I remember I came for a visit in one thousand nine hundred and ninety eight around there, and I remember crossing Ventura on my way back to my car after hanging out at a club called Lava Lee, which is not there anymore, unfortunately, and I think I just watched brandon fields play the smoke and set with Jimmy Earl on base, and I'm not sure who. I can't remember exactly who the other musicians were, but I just kept thinking, why am I not here? And you know, it just seemed like the place for me, you know. And granted it's not a perfect place to live. It's expensive, the traffic sucks, there's earthquakes and fires and and you know, California gets kind of a bad rap in general, but I don't think there's any perfect place to live really. I travel a lot and in my experience the level of complaining by by locals is pretty much the same wherever you go. But the creative energy here and the history of entertainment is just incredible and it's addicting and I'm a proud Angelino and I'm really grateful for what this town is given me and I can't wait to see what happens in the next twenty years. And my guess today actually relocated to this town as well, except he came from a little town own and Alaska. He's an extremely talented guitar players singer who tours with Dennis d young, formerly of the band sticks, and is also on Dennis's latest recording called twenty six east, volume one. He's also one of the members of the band waiting for Monday, which I wrote songs and played bass on their record, and he's an amazing guy with an amazing story. So please enjoy my conversation with August Zadra Star. So were you like formally trained? I moved here from Alaska to go to Giit okay', which is now more probably not, I think, as am I it's used to just be Gi t and then actually, the year I went, they had just opened bi t and v T and kid right. Well, and there's probably even more now, but I was a one year program and I was lucky that I had saved money in Alaska to come down, so I didn't have to work like a lot of my friends were working in going to school, and it was just tough, you know, and I was able to really be immersed in that whole environment and I'd be there sometimes, you know, sixteen hours a day, where I had a roommate and then one point we had three other roommates had crashed on the floor for a while. So it's like I'm just gonna live at school, you know. It's like and I had this beater Squire strat that I still have and love. Wow, I just didn't have a case for it. I just would throw it my locker at school and that thing is just it keeps coming back for more. Wow, that's I used to try to learn. Still Suck at setting my own intonation, but I would grab that guitar be so for just throw it on the ground. It would never break, bounce back up and go fendra. But it was a yeah, a yearlong program there and I learned a lot. I forgot a lot passes, but I can't read music for shit anymore. Yeah, I can. I say Shit on this. It's like you want as a podcast. I don't even know who, if anybody, listens to the right so we're in good shape. But it's just so cool to be there with,...

...you know, probably at least a thousand other students that. Yeah, everybody's there for the same reason. You know, it was kind of at the end of the crazy shred scene. So you would, you know, they used you were calling it the nickname was not there, but you'd walk down the hall, you did. You go there? Know, you would, Burke Luge, Berkeley's right. You walked on the hall and they have all the doors of like a small, like six by six window in or something, hey by maybe, and you'd hear somebody just, you know, playing crazy shit and everyone to look in the window maybe like this, yes, me. You know, it's like it was just so like, dude, I mean I like what you're doing, but you know, all right, it's kind of been intimidating, but it kind of offensive in a way to it's like right, hey, you know, just can you, but can you play with anybody else? I see right nights. Yeah, and there's you know, that's been my thing too. From I know, I grew up with all these admiring and setting all these amazing players, rock players primarily, and at some point you know a lot of people that Oh, you go to Git, you take the pill, you know, then you come out you're this guy. It's like right, I'd already been playing for like seven years when I went, so I knew my way around and it was more learning about theory and, you know, composition. But I never was able to as hard for me to to make peace of this for a while, but I realize I'm never going to get to the technical level of the guys that I the players. I wanted to be right and I you know, I guess for some people lose a ceiling and you know, it was not for lack of trying. And then sometimes when I I still admire these brilliant technical players, but sometimes just the other thing is all some like these singers. It's had the such a high range and I think, man, if I could sing like that or if I could play like that. But then I sometimes I realized if I could I'm the personality probably would never stop playing that that. So I be that annoying guy right and you'll playing. It's like. So that's got to be part of the motivation, I guess. You you got to want to be that guy right to get there. And do you think, because I know and I got to Berkeley. First of all, what you were saying earlier about like to eat, sleeping and breathing music is right. Kind of the best part about both of those school absolutely, you know, just totally being immersed. But I also just met people, and I think I said this on the Abisode, another episode, but that was just spend eight to ten hours practicing along with their classes, and I was just not that guy. So part of me just didn't want to work that hard. You know what I'm like? Yeah, I want to get to a certain level. That's good. I want to be great on my instrument, but man, I don't know if I have it in me to be that guy. And you know, that's a that's something I think everybody faces on their own. Where you, I mean you, you made your your piece with you. You you made a decision right. I was like I can get to this level. I don't need to be that I'm met ninety percent. Maybe I don't great to be a hundred percent or what ever. Be at the top of your game, but it's like I can learn other things, like you know, it's not just about that's what I remember reading. It. Are Not article so old, I'm it was in the Rue. John Roth was original guitar player for the Scorpions and he kind of went into his music. That most people that understand is what he says. But right, he said that my best advice for guitar players reading this, you said try to become more of a musician than a guitarist. Right, and that's where I went. What I'm taking what you're saying is, like you could whether than just being this technical player, whatever instrument you are, there's so many other aspects of being a musician. Right, and I don't that wasn't taught at a Gi T. I don't know if it was at Berkeley, that they're like wheel the world right now benefits. Yeah, how to work with people and, you know, be on time and right, you know, little Yas, and that frustrated me for a long time because I always felt like it should be taught in college and I guess to some extent I do still, especially Berkeley sort of at the time and I guess now and in might for sure, like kind of sells itself as preparing you for the contemporary music scene right yet. But to leave that La just still school, you know, they're still just a school. And but then at the same time I thought, well, I actually I was having a conversation with a friend of mine about it and when I was, you know, younger and mad about it, and he was like, well, you know, that's how the world weeds out people that just can't hack it. all those skills, but now you're going to go in the woral world. Either you're going to learn it or you're not, you know. So I don't know. That called me down enough to be like yeah, I guess I don't know. And Yeah, it'd be nice if they taught some of that stuff, for sure, but I don't know. People are going to work it out one way or another, aren't they? Yeah, and anyway, as we sit here in your studio, we've got drum said, keyboards, guitars, based and and all of your your studio gear it's like it's a funny thing because I where I'm getting at as like you might tell people. I maybe, when you meet somebody, might say, I'm a bass player. Right, you're you're a studio owner, you're a producer, have all these of the other skills that you know when you're when you're focusing and usually as a younger guy, when you're like, I'm going to learn the...

Basse from the guitar as best I can, and you've obviously opened yourself up to all these other avenues. Right. That's yeah, it's huge, it's true, and and that's you know, I guess the difference between like a performance major and like Christ songwriting major or something. You know, it's like I always had a more general view of what I wanted out of music. And who has the time to do all that and be like a monster? Plus, I played prince, yeah, yeah, right, and the guys do it for arter all, right, Waldrena? Yeah, well, plus, I played bass, so like one note at a time and one of the time, Sary says, and have a too many chops can lose you the GIG test. Yeah, you know what I mean. And Yeah, or maybe I shouldn't put that way. Maybe it's like there's a there's a lower level of chops that you need to function really, you know, true, and and I you know, I played with Kikom Ont Suer for twelve years and you know, within that time, like we did a show and al Di Meola one time. So, wow, it's not like I don't have the chops, you know, and I worked on all that stuff and I did it, but I feel like my career since then is just been slowly like less and less, and now I'm playing on a country gig where don't don't play any jobs. On a country GIG. You'll yeah, you know, it's a great sight get fired but at the same time more musical and more musical, not that I want to be wasn't musical or as people aren't musical, but it just it's just a different kind of thing and I'm I kind of enjoy what I play more now that I'm not just freaking out about like, Oh, I need all these chops. You know, I've seen guys with great chops. You couldn't play it notes right. It's act. Now can you do locking with the drums? And Yeah, I feel this. There's a lot more gigs for people who can just really play a song. Yeah, I don't play your guitar. Play the song, right. That back to being a musician on a guitarist. Right. Yeah, play the song. I've heard that way. That's not like that. So all you were there was Eddie van Halen a influence. Has He been an influence on you? I did see a solo online of you doing some some hammer on sawesome. It Really Eddie stuff? Really? Yeah, you were. Oh, what hell it is? Yeah, controd and the GIG with Dennis. Yeah, which so back then, but just a hair. One of the things I said, you know, everybody had to put they're at a piece of it when Eddie in past and I said that his influence for our our generation was inescapable. And so there's any rock guitar player that says he was not influenced Patty, he's lying, right. I mean it is his, the breadth of what he'd brought to the table with. Yeah, you know his or he doesn't realize it. Yeah, you know, true. That's what someone else mence. I heard someone say something about that. The influence, whether it's whether you realize he or not, but it's like it's just it's in the air. You know, all those things that he that he kind of brought into the rock vocabulary and you almost a lot of these things. You almost had to. It's like you want to be taking incredibly as a guitar but you had to be able to, you know, do the triplet hammer on thing. It's right, and then, you know, it became so diluted with so many people doing it. And it doesn't take away from from him. Yeah, you know, but when you hear him do it, it's, yeah, like a whole other level than most guys. Yeah, he's just harmonically like he's just taking it to all kinds of Oh man, I'm getting chills as I'm talking about it. And I remember, you know, Eric, when that when an album came out, I'd just been playing guitar, veiling one. They've been playing guitar for about half a year. Maybe didn't. You can maybe play GCD and I'd be seven from the Melbay book, but the hardest Chord ever be seven or HAL if. But somebody there's a guitar player in the high school that every kind of looked up to and he was the guy and I remember he was saying that you should get this. You go by this van healing record and you even played a little bit of eruption for men like a cassette, and I mean like, because this is all one guy. And at the time I'm like I didn't. It didn't hit me as something because I didn't know anything about what guitar playing was. Right, I'm like right, you know that when he first had that that hammer on section, the tapping part was like a fugue and nobody played guitar like that at all and it was people like how does he do that? It's over dubbed and right. And so I bought the record. I went home and I'm drop a needle on. Starts with the horns and it goes into running with the devil and I got about halfway through the song and I'm like I like this, put it away. I think it might have been Roth's voice more than anything, but just wasn't. I couldn't take it. And you know, like a year later it's my favorite record. Yeah, kind of thing. Yeah, yeah, I wasn't a big fan either. Actually, I liked hey are better. Honestly, like fifty and fifty was like Whoa like when that came out, it was just like so, you know, I'm more I was a fantom like pop music, and just it was just in more of a pop record, kind of locked out. Those songs are just more poppy and I think that Hayar kind of allowed Eddie to be. His scope of composition was broad and he right get a guy that could sing everything that he was playing. Right. Yeah, and nothing against Roth. I actually love them both and I...

...will say as much flat as David gets for his live vocals. You go back in you I mean there's plenty of ice later tracks on line from the first record. He was killing in the studio. Yeah, I mean it's great. Vibrato is pitches craty as was crazy screams and yeah, he's you know, yeah, he's. He's, you know, clean. The famous more of his showmanship and as a front man, but he really could sing. Yeah, he killed in the studio, Oh man, for sure. And you know, I I look back now and I've been watching all kinds of videos because this is going to air in a week or so, but he just died yesterday. So right, facebook is just, you know, video out to video and like I look back now and I appreciate it so much more now and and, but I was watching I think ain't talking about love from something somewhere in the s and like David Lee, rob is killing and I how does he make that high screechy sound like I've never heard that sound before. And you know, just that sound alone puts him in an echelon of singers. That's like that's a distinguished airs his place. I mean you know you nobody else can do that. That's legendary. Crazy thing is that? That guy his name right now, Ralph sayings. Who you know? Michael Diamond From Steel Panther? He can do it to a tea, right's great. It's like a s weird. It's we said. I'll try to imitate that or not. The only way I can do is like an inhaling. It was I knew this was not good for my throat. R's right, yeah, sound like Roth Anyway. But that was and that's another thing. I just think about the atomic punks. I remember, you know, that late s early it doesn't Eddie just came out of nowhere and this level the playing field, raise the bar. But I then fast words like the early s maybe when the atomic punks were kind of coming up in La and I had a buddy might come down from Alaska and we went to go see them at the whiskey. There's still were so good and it's you kind of get caught up in this when you're seeing it's like I'm taking it for granted, like Eddie's ability. It's like that. Then you see a guy who's really playing it almost as possible, as well as it possibly could be. Right, they've always said brilliant guitar players. I'm seeing some guy, you know, ten feet away, if you playing that stuff and you see how incredible it was. Right, and he did that Shit twenty years ago. You like yeah, this is just I don't know where. And he was. Yeah, you know, it's another point. I saw some making that. You know, when Eddie did all this stuff, he was really just a kid, like twenty early s and hadn't really found hadn't fully developed yet. And and see already had monster chops and ideas. Yeah, every album there was a new mind blowing guitar technique to unveil. Yeah, yeah, pretty great. So you mentioned Alaska a couple times and yeah, I'm always fascinated with people from Alaska. I've never that's my one state. I haven't been too really and I yeah, I've definitely have to get there. Is A proxibly two places you can play in the whole state, so I'm sure it'd probably they there is a big country music base of the area. So yeah, there were Dwight. Yeah, well, I'm putting it out in the universe. There you go. Alaska. I had hope. To back up a hair, I guess. I I was born in Alaska but weren't raised in a little town outside of Fairbanks, which is fairbanks is the second largest city in Alaska with at the time had about Sixtyzero people and we lived about twenty miles outside of town, two miles from the city of North Pole, Alaska. Wow. And my actual town was called Moose Creek. And then we my folks were both educators and grow by any on Alston Air Force Base. Oh can like when I first moved out to California, first time I had pulled over and at a North Pole driver's license to me, so you would you have your jog sled team here? I was like I said something smart. He's like really, I'm like yes, sir, sir. So did you do like music in high school and my I don't go to too many boring details, but when I was a kid, thirteen, three, you know, I grew up playing baseball like literally they got everybody did. That's a misunderstanding or somebody you should be clarified about Alaska to it's you know that the summer is essentially a June, July, August, little bit of September, and but the daylight, there's twenty hours of daylight. The souls just John June, twenty one. There's literally twenty three and a half hours of daylight right. So the sun's kind of dips, but it's I mean it's like this outside of midnight. You know, it's crazy. They have it's called the midnight Sun game, which the Semipro baseball team in fairbanks, the gold panners. They start at the game at midnight with no artificial lights. Wow, I think one time they've had to have artificial lighting it. But the flip side, of course, is mid November through mid February it's pitch black for twenty hours a day. When you're a kid going to school, when you're working, you look out the window like ten o'clock in the morning there's a little bit of Sun and you know but it goes down at too so what time you're off work, out of school, it's pitch black again, and and you're being born and raised there. That's all I knew. So wasn't weird to make people people always saying how did you live like that? It's like right, what we did? Right, yeah, but you know, I had friends that come up to the military base, Air Force Base, every eighteen months. I'd have a new friends, you know, but it's like people would come up there and just freak out because like they had to put tinfoil on their windows and trying to get some...

...some sense of darkness to sleep and Ray and the winter it's, you know, it's by full time. Suppressing can be. But so my thing in the summers was playing. Fished all the time, of course, but my thing was baseball. Cool, and I was a pitcher. I was never like a really tall, big kid or anything, but I had really good aim, I really really accurate and I never I couldn't not didn't really have much of a fastball, but I had really could control it. Had IT. had a good curveball and then somebody started teaching me to throw. It was a slider and I messed up my elbow and starting have a lot of trouble with it out. My claim to fame as at I was a starting and losing picture for the ALLSTAR team two years in row and I threw a no hitter one year. But that's got it cool. But we went to the doctor and, you know, they said a fractured growth center in my right elbow and said, you know, you can't play baseball anymore. And my mom kind of joking, well, what should he do now? And he's like, you should about playing guitar and just like the we're just comment right, and I was like Oh what the doctor said? YEA, and so they know, not you. Not shortly after that I and the next school year I sign up for like beginning guitar and my parents had bought me this Sears Guitar Nice and God bless him, like two thousand ninety nine, I think it was in the catalog. Do you for have a serious catalog? Yeah, I'm old. See this picture. Oh my God, this I'm just covered this plastic guitar. But I got it and had you like I think it was nylon strings of the time or I can't remember, but it was junk, you know, but I tried my best to figure out to do something with it. So the school year started and and you know my parents. My Dad was a superintendent, so we knew all the teachers and everything, but the music teacher he had had my my my older brother and elder sister, you're one year and two years older than me. Both played. She played fluid. He played trumpets. of He knew the family and everything. And and hit this guitar and he said you take this home. You say, this is firewood. I need a real good star. So my real guitar and it being a it was an epiphone, but it was called an Eppie. The head Sucker said EPI. Oh, weird, that's kind of funny. I'm to loot. Don't have a collectable now. Yeah, but well, I got my first guitar out of Finger Hut, my first elect finger hut. Yeah, the fingers catalog, you know. It was harmony a guitar. Oh yeah, and that came with a little plastic amp, but eventually me and my brother's tore it all apart and built other things out of it. Nice and then I got that. That was my second guitar. Every now the fender squire. That's now hanging in my studio. But yeah, I'm familiar with the junk that comes out of catalogs. Yeah, and that's so. I was learning a little bit of guitar and then I started playing. There was a bass player that was also in the guitar classroom. Head already played bass for a little couple of years and his dad was a guitar player and one day, you know, he's don't come over on Saturday or I'm sure, and I literally in one day. He was like getting sick of he's like I can we do something else? I he taught. I learned everything he knew on guitar. It's like obviously a lot of young because I was like a sponge for it. Yeah, give me this, I want everything. And and couple weeks after that he said, Oh, my dad's got a nose a guy that's selling a guitar. It's a it's a fender strat and it's like four hundred dollars. And you know, I was, oh my God, I Havn't. I'm pretty sure I didn't pay for myself. I don't honestly remember. I'm sure my my parents want to bought it for him, but four hundred bucks and has that. You know that those sexy cases is all that. You know, the girl pimped out its orange felt. I still have that and it's still have the guitar too. And this kind of relates back to the eddiething and in the sense that, you know, I bought this stock strata caster HMM, and shortly afterwards I had somebody, you know gut, carve it out and there a humbucker and there it's like the same way Duncan invader. Yeah, and then somebody carved it out and put a I wanted to get a floyd rose and they said, Oh, we love stock and Alaska of anything right. But like well, I've got this Taylor and I'm like all right, and I actually came to really like Taylor's later. But this one, this one's kind of a this one wasn't happening. But right, and I put a couple of micro switches in it for God knows what, a face switch and a coral split or something. But that Guitar Move The Dallas with me and back to Alaska and it was just so thrashed. I think I'd put it, put it in a case. Just forgot about it for a couple of years and then I had a really good friend who was working for fender and he should send me that one. I'll see if I can do with it and I'll build another one for it. I have this great parts caster and, like you know, one of those things like I got it one piece at a time. Right, it's really a cool guitar. But but he sent the back to the seventy nine strat to me the big head stock, and it was say, okay, and then a couple years later, another body might want to see it. Also, I'll work on it for and just never was happening and just sat there next to me for a while with no bridge, no strings. But it's like sentimental value, kind of yeah. And then one point, like it doesn't even. I just need a room. I could get rid of this thing. And another buddy of mine said, you know, let me, let me you mind if...

I just take it in and see if I can do something with it. I said you could saw it in half and burn it up and if it if it messes up me and it's all good, don't worry about it. Right, and he did an amazing job on me. He sent me pictures with. He text me, your guitars on fire right now. I'm like what the whole is? It's a good thing. And and he's dragging across the gravel and it looks so amazingly distressed. Then I got a new bridge for it after NAM I'm cool, Vega Trim me up with a amazing bridge. Wow, and it's a great guitar. I'd plan to take out on the road with Dentnis this year, and it's like Yay, wow, I'm in a weird place right now where you know will come arst to I'm playing Acoustic Guitar Right you know, I get every Friday at home. But yeah, when I have not played electric guitar through an amp in five months and I'm at the point now where I'm almost scared, it's like, yeah, you know how bad thing he's gonna be I pick it up again. But yeah, you know, on one hand it's differences. Oh, you play a lot of acous guitars, going to get your traps way ups like well, I'm sitting playing chords, it's strumming, it's all right, so right, it's not shredding. Yeah, I do. Ready, Van Halen likes well, that was the thing. That's like I'm trying to play some Veniss of them, like, Oh my God, yeah, that's a trip. Yeah, I played, like, yeah, I've lay my first GIG, like not this last week, on of the week and before, and it was like a for our casual as we call them here. You know, it is a was a proposal party actually really. Yeah, it's cool, but with Dwight, I play everything with a pick and I haven't used my fingers and almost three years, really, you know. So after spending the and I haven't really played that kind of GIG and a couple of years either. So I had to kind of relearn all, you know, Brown eyed girl, and start your stuff. I played a million times. I'm like, I have haven't done it forever. So after spending like five six hours the during the day practicing, are you like there's rarely had any fingers left. Yeah, and like blood blister and like which hand is worse? When you right hand? Yeah, sure, yeah, because like this and you know, I still play all the time right, but I did use pick. So like no callous has left. Yes, you know. So I made it through three sets in the last that I had to play a pick on I was like, I can't, I can't hand. Them going to kill my you know this is going to bleed eventually. You know what I mean? It's first his craft, yeah, but other than that it came back relatively like running. I think you're kind of be fun especially somebod who's played so many shows. I mean it's funny you mentioned Brannie girl to because it's like, you know, I started doing anything where I would have like contest winners, like three people would submit three songs on pick one out of the three and do it and you should like get pretty interesting songs, and somebody had sent in. It was like two songs were pretty obscure and Brown eyed girl. I'm like, I had almost said to somebody online research, like I will never play, you know, and my girl Margarita Ville or it's some real sounds that you know that there songs you hear everywhere. We've all played them a million times. People Love Them. They're their classics for a reason, but it's like it kind of feels like you're killing yourselfer when you do it. And I said, well, I I know my wife and both my daughters have brown eyes, like I can make this work. And then I like end up playing one of the screw songs, like I can't do it. Yeah, yeah, it's a tricky yeah, I mean I've played so many bar gigs and that song so many times that it just after a while. I'm like all I want to do is make happy, like it's not. You know, that's the thing. It's that's hard our role. Yeah, I don't. I have not in many, many, many years, think I'd played the Gig where I feel like this sucks, this is just working. Right now. It's like we're very fortunate with what we do that. We had a bass player friend that used to say, I don't care what song it is, if I hate it, I can find one thing in there right musically, that about this song that I like and I focus on that and get through it. MMM, and it could be somebody's favorite song out there. Yes, yeah, and when I was younger, like my mid twenties, I was playing a band and I it's weird now because I play with a country icon, but I was not really a fan of country music back then. You know, for your sea exactly, and you know, and I was a Jazzer then to you know, and but I just remember being in this cover band and we played at this this Im from Denver, so there's this little cowtown out in the middle of nowhere and they wanted country and luckily this band knew like three or four country songs and I was never more happy to play country than that night. And to know some country is like when the crowd is in it, it doesn't even really matter, like you know, kind of in it just for that energy and like, oh my gosh, thank God we know something. Yeah, there's nothing worse than that. Yeah, it's like, well, do you play me? This will no, no, I know it's a drag. And that's a funny thing about country. To It's you know, in the last ten or fifteen years, let the new country should say. I'm sure Dwight's probably not desire very but you know a lot of it. It sounds eerily similar to s rock. Yeah, yeah, yeah, I used to work for a guy. My first band I was ever in, Chuck Hughes, was a he's maybe he's listening here. I was in Denver and now he has a band called the hill billy hellcats. If you're into the...

...rockabilly, cool and that, but this was a cover band. Weddings he was on like Eric's older rock and rolls, brand new to the country. There you go. And then cut to like that year garth brooks was huge and had like an NBC special, like his concert at prime time, and at the end they take two acoustic guitars and wreck bash them together and destroy on them. Like there it is. What's the old rock and rolls branded together under I've ever something either. Garth seted himself. They were seeing about it shorts, like it's like kind of like a kiss concert. Now it's like you right, yeah, he's flying out of the crowd and stuff. It's right. Yeah, totally. But we were talking about your facebook live thing and it's a every Friday at seven. Every Friday, seven PM Pacific Time. My family I had been in Mexico. We'd have a time Sharita Cobo over here in March and while we were down there, everything really we had just been in Vegas. He played March fifth in Vegas, so we'd all been in that Cesspool of Fremont Street afterwards. You to get any German magic was there. Right then we flew to to se DIGO and played alcohol on the sixth and I had a couple of gigs. I think I suposed to play the eighth and the ninth somewhere in the in the Midwest, and so my family was going to go to Cobbo or ahead of me, and then those gigs, it's Gig, started dropping. So those aren't happening. So I was able to go with them. We're supposed to come back and I was supposed to go right from home the next morning. FLED GIGS in Portland and Seattle, and my family was going to fly up to Seattle because I had family coming down from all ASKA's amazing family reunion and our says. We know. None of those things happened, right. So I'd been home after we got back from from from vacation, trying to stock pile as much toilet paper as we could. Yeah, yeah, thost of the days. Gosh, I know we've actually went to COSCO and bought some right before all the started happening, and we can go about four months. On one of the Costco days we were like, thank goodness, you know that we bought this, but this is for the quarter slot on your breath room. So you guys can have come over here. It's pay toilet. Sorry, but I don't know what it was. I had seen initially, but somebody had done a, you know, live stream event of some sort and I thought, well, I'm kind of going stir crazy. Already liked being home for a week wherever. It's like right, I'll just, you know, set up my my stool and Acoustic Guitar. I've been doing Acoustic Giggs around town with Adrian Golish for about the last three years at that point. And Right, so I had some I up to that first Friday I played. I'd only done in my life three gigs just by myself. Wow. And so this this was a bit of a challenge, and it was. But it was kind of fun knowing that really only on the person the room is my wife, right, right, and you're staring at this, you know, at your iphone, or you're, you know, but hoping people blow out there. But I thought, I said, I'll start at seven o'clock and I'll just, I'll I think I was supposed to play like fifteen songs or something, and things have gone along way from there. But but there was, you know, three hundred and fifty people showed up the first night and I was like well, wow, this is not what I really expected. I got to overwhelmed and did it again the next week. Great Response Again, and so then it kind of took off for then I moved out into the living room. Yeah, and I raise the there's still no production vibe I think about what's been. Definitely better though. Yes, it's been. It's been great for me. Several things to talk about there where I was fortunate, Lucky, whatever it might be, on two levels. Where originally I didn't say, you know, I'm playing a GIG on Saturday. You Come see me play my show. I just called it the you know that's acoustic happy hour. Hang Right. It's just basically as if you're sitting in my living room with me and I'm playing guitar. I'll stop in the middle of the song. I make mistakes almost every song and you know, sometimes I'll play half a song and break into some of their conversation. But it's very loose. Yeah, and I have, you know, I I've learned a couple of things about myself where people said you your too tard and yourself, because it's like I'll I'll get upset with myself if I can't remember the chord change, because I tend to make lyric sheets and think, well, I won't, I know the chords, right in the middle of like playing thirty songs, like, AH, where's this going? For? Really lose your flow, you know. But right, they said. You know, we don't really care if it's perfect. We're just kind of hanging out. Everybody's and one of the jokes, I always say it because I'm playing by myself. I don't use a low pedal, looper pedal or anything. It's like if I drop out to play a solo, there's there's no base, there's no foundation. Yeah, yeah, So said. You know, I'm just going to keep playing the chords behind the solo and you guys can drink when I solo. Yeah, that's the soul. And this has become a thing. It's been become very little community is built up. There's a new page with about three hundred people on it that I've seen. Friendships developed out of this thing. And Right, I'm fortunate in that. You know, I have. This sounds egotistical, but it's a very small level. I have a national fan base just from touring, as you would write, you know, we write, and so I have. It's all about, you know, after show hanging out in a hotel bar for fifteen minutes or fifteen...

...hours. We're right. Yeah, I just engaging with people at right, especially Jimmy Leahy, the guitar player, and Dennis has band. We're kind of the you know, the toxic twins. After the show we hang out, talked everybody in Nice. I'll sit and spend you know, I put up this live stream thing and half the people that are on there are two thirds of people or people have met around the country that I said high to after a show one time and it's been really kind of cool to see that. Yeah, but it's like, you know, I'm not building any chops on this Gig that I vocally, I think I know it's I'm right and I'm doing like in the three hours a night. Sometimes it gets to be pretty hairy. And Yeah, I'm doing a lot of stuff from one of my buddy says, you're doing a lot of songs in the deep end of the pool. And although I also I tuned down a full step, oh, because there's no way I could sing all that high rocks stuff for two hours or three hours. So that yeah, that's like I was saying earlier. I always want to be that guy that could seeing up there. I can't quite get there. So, yeah, cheat and pull it. pull the key down right, right. Yeah, yeah, and it was just you. You can do whatever you want, right, it's your show. That's a thing. Well, it's really fun. I mean it's and I've been kind of enjoying that on the weekends anyways, because a lot of people are doing it, you know. So now you get on facebook and it's just like you can bar hop just right, you know, like there's so many and it's getting less and last as people get back to work and whatever, it feels re open up a little bit. Yeah, but but it's been kind of a cool thing and, you know, who knows where we're going after this? You know, this might be a big part of the future. You know so, and you've already got this established now, and that's where I was lucky to kind of get a firm play my Humm, can't find a metaphors. Snipe it, I said, sub shop there at seven o'clock on Friday, which pretty prime time. M Yeah, I've not missed a show in thirty weeks. So, yeah, that's amazing. Kind of afraid to let it go, you know. Yeah, and your your wife kind of tends to. You get mad because he's stealing the spotlight. Absolutely. I'm like, honey, and show is that she's awesome. And it's funny because we first back that first show, I'm like well, you know, I'll face the camera here and then you could sit just so here ups you could like bring me drinks and stuff, like see me, Hey, gary, like be the waitress, you know that kind of thing, and I can call for you bring me a musk on meal and you can sit over here and you can like keep up with the comments, because it's like six people watching right, all right, and it's you know, it's a twenty five hundred comments to show whatever. It's like. You can't keep up with everything sees. Yeah, she kind of tends to. She helps me with all the lighting and everything and I'm a wreck. But I mean it's funny. I don't know how you ever things like this would dennis young show anywhere we play. I you know, unless I have people friends are in the room like backstage me, then sometimes get nervous, but yeah, usually it's like I'm going out, I'm ready to go. I'm a can't wait to get down stage right any any local GIG, is me playing by myself on Friday or, you know, whatever it might be, a do or bansag. I've lose my mind. I have her. I like just wreck, you know really. Yeah, she's like, Oh my God, just settle down, but it definitely adds. Yeah, I'm a wreck just doing this, like like let's make a podcast. That sounds fun and I'll just interview my friends and stuff. But I don't know, I feel like if I'm having a great time now, but sometimes the interviews the least, my least favorite part. God, I gotta do you know, it's a lot of research, and that's, yeah, fun, but it's like you just never know how it's gonna go. Am I going to get what I need? Remembers in the hot seats? Yeah, I know, I like so I don't. Yeah, I'm a wreck all the time, but nice. So you mentioned him a bunch, and so your main Gig is Dennis de Young. Yes, you're probably completely tired of telling the story, but yeah, it's kind of amazing how you got this Gig. They've made movies about it, but you're like the actual guy, not not the lone actual guy. Now there's right. You know, and the actual guy that kind of was ripper owens from judics priest was. That's y similar thing. And people say, Oh, it's like they need a movie about yours, like well as a few years behind the curve, unfortunately. Right, but say similar story in some ways. And and the backstory is I'd been in a sticks tribute band here in La called the grand illusion, and that's the only band other than some top forty bands in my early s kind of thing or our brands. I never sang in any bands. I would but see you pass the balls like okay, you seeing three songs using but no one was like a singer right. And I remember I was still in high school and some stick Song I was I think it was too much high on my hands, like I have a similar voice to that guy. I can. I can sing that on. So and then I had been in and out of a bunch of faceless, name less, went nowhere bands in La and I saw an ad for a journey tribute bands. This is probably back in like ninety three or four, and I thought it is back in music connection, you know. I'm like, yeah, I remember seeing this out of that tribute band. That's what's weird said, if there's a guy that can sing like Steve Perry, why wouldn't need be doing it, you know, like I know on his own right. And I went to go. Actually, I think call the number whatnot, and I had a record something. I might even make a set of the time. Right, right. I didn't record like playing along with stone and love or something. Instid it to him and but it's a they would even tell me who the singer was, because...

...he's some famous guy, right, and like whatever. And and it said, well, you know, it's he's backing out of the whole thing, we're not going to do anything. But I like, well, that was my first failed you know, for into tribute. It's but then I write, I saw an ad for a sticks band. Will that be kind of fun? And I went to go and and met these guys and and we all clicked in and started doing so I work together and we we played off and on run town and different lineups for six, seven, eight years. I think it wasn't. At points we would morph into a journey, a Boston Toub band, and I'd played in a journey tribute band for a whild too. But anyway, so I I had the last Gig we had done in the sticks tribute, said the Polsino down by San Diego area, and somebody's girlfriend in the band had a you know, cam qorder or something set up by the sound booth and it's very distant video, but the audio turnough fantastic and it was a good band and the songs are okay. Knows we had but so I at one point, I'm always, you know, I'm not exactly an early adopter of technology. So at some point I got the means to digitize the the VHS, or it wasn't, and so I started doing that and I like go this new youtube thing everyone's putting on the youtube all the put some stuff up there and I put like six, six of the songs on there and literally two days later I got a call from Danny wild from the rembrands. I was doing some he was going to be working on a film. It involve some stix music and you wonder if I'd be interested working on my course. And nothing ever happened there. But two months later I got a call from this guy and it's a I'm not good on the phone, as many of my friends. No, but speaking of technology, at phone thing, man, it's kind of new to me. I can take pictures, but where you just came here. And so this guy called me. I got an of the message. Are Yea, this is so and so. I'm a light soil, I'm producer, manager or a lot. I work with somebody and I don't double. I gave me a call. I'm like the nerve of that. Call me at home where I know who you are. I I am not call him back tucking. And then two days are you called a gainers and and we emailed me. So I'm trying to reach song so and so. I googled is his email address right? And comes up dennisty young's website. Right, like okay, I guess I will call him back right and and the other thing is you have that band. I had the band had not played in six years and that's the only man I'd ever sang lead in. And so I finally I call the guy. We talked for like forty five minutes and I was just like this is pretty amazing. And because he said Dennis is looking to make you some changes and you know, you know, or what's your availability? What's your bubble blond? Also, the first time my life had being older was as soon as a positive and that's twenty three at the time. But and they saw my facebook profile picture. Had it was near cristaps December, twenty two, had both my daughters, like my younger daughters, holding like a plastic pink guitar in front of the Christmas tree and all cool and there's a family guys, is great. Anyway, I was wrapping up the phone call and I said, well, you know, what's the next step? And he said, well, you know what, Dennis is interested. I'll give you a call. Like okay, well, I'm thanks for reaching out and it's been phone black right and the next morning, you know, ten o'clock, whatever else, and my daughter's like and Dennis, somebody on the phone. I'm like what got the phone? He's like, August, is Dennis Deyong, and I was like Whoa fucking where? And it was. It was a trip star. So there are a lot of us out of work right now waiting to get back to play and shows and touring, and I know I've had to do whatever I can do to take my mind off the situation from time to time, and one of the ways to pass the time is to catch up on some books you've missed. But if you're like me and you don't love to read, there's another way you can consume audiblecom has thousands of titles to choose from, including audio books about music production, songwriting, the music business, music theory, instructional audio books and biographies of Your Favorite Musical Heroes. But besides audio books, you can also listen to podcasts, theatrical performances, a list comedy and exclusive audio originals you won't find anywhere else. Right now, you can get a free thirty day trial if you visit audible Trialcom, dive, Bar Rock Star. That's audible trial, doc calm, dive bar rock star, and you can catch up on your audio reading. I'd like to take a second to thank you for listening to the dive, Bar Rockstar podcast. As a new podcast, getting the word out as a vital part of what it takes to keep the show on the road, or off the road, as the current case. Maybe if you would...

...like to support the podcast, all you got to do is subscribe wherever you listen and if you have an extra minute or two, please leave a review. You can also share and follow the podcast on your social media APPS. Okay, enough begging. I hope you're having fun and once again, thank you for listening. Sticks was a very important band for me. They were not going to lie se they're always my favorite band of all time. Right. But you know, and seriously, I mean remember hearing like the from the grand illusional. I'm like the keyboard swell at the beginning of fooling yourself. You that's what the cool older kids were listening to. I'm like that, that sounds cool and you know, and that's the remains one of my favorite parts and in the side when I got into this, well, I talked to Dennis for a long time and I was just he have a lot of questions. He's also very suspicious of technology as definitely, but the problem is playing to see too much technology. But he said, I've seen this, I've seen this video, this of you, and he said, you know, I, but anybody could be know, alter the the audio on that and you know if that's really you and you can sound like that and you and me can make a thing, make a sound again, other than you know, it's not an audition. You got the Gig if you if you want to do this and because you know when? When can you be here like this, December twenty two, you know. I'm like, well, I've you know how soon you wanted to go on to move pretty quick on this. I'm like, that's almost Christmas, you know, and it's I got hands and he said what can you be here like just after? I said, well, I've got a New Year's trip planned also, we're going to big bear on them. Well, when are you gonna be at like, well, I January. Second, he goes, and they can be here on the third. And you know, the next day, I haven't. You know, you sent me a confirmation for my ticket and I was like and where is here? CHICAGO. So he's Chicago born and raised. Yep, you know, after out of the phone with him, I was like, holy crap, this this, this is a real thing. And Right, I'm only went to panic mode because I hadn't saying anything. And you know, and that's stuff. You know, it's in my arrange. Tommy's got a telly show. I has a higher voice than I do. Buy a little bit. I could see most of what he does. Some of it is above what I comfortable doing. Yeah, I had to like beat myself up for a week singing like seven and yeah, you know, and and totally stick's greatest hits is in my house constantly. The kids do every song. This why my wife is playing it all. I'll let in the car and everything. But I remember going to the airport and going with running through lax and they're like, you know, passengers are out drug our doors are clothes. are like no, that's so freaked out, you know. And and Dennis had give me like three songs to learn. I knew already, of course, you know, right, the cobwebs off them, but it's like the big ones. I was renegade and color man and crystal ball or something, but right, anyway. So I flash a COGO and I just saw freaked out and excited and it's two things. It's January. Third is the middle of winter and the winter is really a thing in Chicago. Yeah, and wanted me to come over here at ten o'clock in the morning. I'm like that's eight o'clock my time, like no one sends seeing high stuff. And so, I mean I hardly slept the dogs I'm so nervous, you know. And so I go down a lobby of the hotel. It's like two minutes from his house and he's pulls out, this Mercedes pulls up. I can look like because it looks like him, and then, you know, trunk opens. Walking out there, he put my guitar on the trunk and open the door. I said good mornings. We'll see about that, as here's a thing quid to it. That kind of step back. Dennis has kind of a largely this I would attribute to the Vach one behind the music thing or HMM. He's often portrayed as being egotistical control freak. And you know, the thing is, he's super he's a highly intelligent man. He's, I mean, very well ready can you can speak on any subject. He's very quick witted. He's very sarcastic, which kind of Chicago thing. Right. So I think it what comes across once you know him, it's that sarcastic wit, where if you don't know him it can come across the arrogance, I think, mm and so right away I'm like Shit, this guy and what says deal. It's like I'll see if it's a good morning or not. Right, a small talk on the two minutes to his house and then you go up and his got gated community is amazing house and I'll listen. We go into the kitchen. Is kind of like small talk for men, because I know now stairs he's got his amazing studio in the basement, you know, and it's whnny. We're walking down the stairs and he's got these movie posters on the either side and an odd combination or you know what, a right wide range of films, right, and he saw me like make a face at one of me and he said, I just want you to know these aren't like my favorite movies from these are all the films that my music has been used in. Like okay, makes sense. But to get down there and it's very impressive. It's of course, I'd never seen something this gold records all over the walls, gold sets, I'd never seen you. It's the roboto masks, all these amazing photos everywhere and everything and he's got this great studio set up. And then if there's a you know, baby grand and so we got your guitar, said turning up every things. Sit Down with me here at this at the piano, but the guitar now was gonna sing any ten thirty maybe,...

...and I'm just like, I'm kind of an awe, you know. Yeah, and so he sits down and I'm sitting next to me started playing lady. You know that. I was like Tommy's big thing to it's like if you can hit the N on lady, you're in. And so it's like he starts playing and I swear to at my first thought was, I'm like it sounds just like the fucking something about it. It's like, Yeah's the guy. It's like you can play the same nose, but it sounds just like. I'm like, Oh, I was a WHO, you know. Yeah, and he opens his he's just he's and I've seen him do this for ten years now. It's like it could be, you know, eight o'clock in the morning, three in the afternoon, eight o'clock at night. He always sounds the same. It's what anny went time. I told me it's a freak of nature and he said I prefer a nominally, he just starts lad. He's just playing. I'm like sitting there waiting my turn and he's like because, and it goes to in the be fight a like course is coming, because you're ready. Yeah, see it. He just looks at me like that was interesting, like yes, let's just try that again, showing the second time wasn't much better, and I'm just like, what was that happening? He gets up and he's behind me right and I'm like, he puts his hands on my shoulder and just look. I know that you don't see me the way I see me and I know that you know you're you're nervous right now and I'm waiting for the slice off my head. But he said yeah, it goes. You're out here because I think you can do this. And he said, let's go upstairs and relax from and we'll come back to go upstairs and you had coffee or something whige, kind of shoot the shit a little bit and because let's go back down s try it again. Come let me do this, and he told me, ladies and he's thinking, I've got myself into this kid he can't even say so we go down there and the same thing. He sounds amazing to get with the chorus and I hit it and he's like here we go. Yeah, and if like that that sounded pretty cool again and he's like, because yeah, this sounds good, sounds really good, and he goes that get your guitar and we did a couple other things. And and then I'll sitting his inner in order by a phone call and it was his manager and it turned out he was auditioning a bass player the same day. But the scheduling got messed up and it's by somebody and Craig the Bass player was sitting at the airport waiting for a ride. Nobody who was there. Wow, so range for a car. He was there in about forty five minutes from that point. So we're didn't sires, kind of getting to know each other a little bit and talking about the music and stuff. And now the Craig gets there. He walks in and this massive, didn't you know, table and and Dennis at the head of table. I'm sitting like to his ride and cry was sound like Hey, new guy, I got forty five minutes senior already right. Don't like but bliss is hard. He's sweetheart of a guy and he's a Nashville Guy Bass player and he is Craig Carter is his name, and he would get a lot of session work to replace female vocals on things. You know that this voice right. So and he had he comes from like a Gospel RMP background and he didn't know sticks from Adam Right. Yeah, but they gave him the three audition songs and so he's got those and we're literally walking. He's behind me, we're walking down the stairs. Go to the try the song again and he's like real, yeah, we did the high part. I'm like, Oh man, I think I love you rather mean sitting there. Hit the D on lady. I'm not gonna hit the a right. So it's, you know, the F sharp add try it and it's so in his range. Effortlessly makes it's like I said about you hitting that note on waving and raps. He's like, at least make it look hard. Okay, but we're sending, sending really good on the songs and when we're doing lady over and over, it's that's kind of that's a beautiful harmony, know, and he starts getting excited. He's like a telling his son Matt come down here and we'll come back to matt a minute to come down to listen to this, and we do there like three times. You know, is I has a great I think is Susanne come down earlier Tim have the manager come down. It's like I guess sounds good. And finally gets his wife to come down Susanne. He's like this is this? It's just like Hmm, he's what hell? She smiled. But the reason so, you know, put the videos on Youtube and Dennis, his son, Matt, kind of famously and INSOMNIAC, and it was not too many years I think, after a journey, had found arnel on Youtube, right, and so matt was up one night, midnight. He's like Filipino sticks vocalist. Actually, we couldn't, can't find but you know, going down the Youtube Rabbit Holes, we've all done. Yeah, eventually, somehow I'd got to do me HMM, and he was like wow, and it was I think it was you a man in the Wilderness, which one of my favorite song. So sticks Tommy's the saying. And so matt called Dennis was like thirty and he was like at night and he's like they're better be blood. You know what calls me the thing. It's like dad, you gotta gotta go to your computer right now watch this, and that's amazing. It was pretty unreal. So I always said God bless mad do young, God bless the Internet, God bless Youtube. Thank you, Tommy Shaw. Right. Wow, and that's a point I want to make two real quick and that's the role. I mean it's basically Dennis hired me so that they...

...could start. Dennis for years was doing his solo show and they didn't do any of the Tommy Shaw songs. Hem, and then he decided that when people go to see sticks currently he was saying that they aren't they're not getting the whole package. Whose there's some songs of Dennis is that they don't do right and Dennis doesn't do some of the time. It does do any of the timmy songs. So city wanted to deliver the whole package. Yeah, of a classic sticks performance and I always say that I've really just trying to do the songs with as much respect and as much passion and you know, I i. I think those songs are great and yeah, it's to do them in the beyond stage with with Dennis. It's every nightmail or at some point squad. Can't believe I'm you know right. It's been a real thrill. That's me. But another fun fact that Tommy Sewan I have the same birthday. That's crazy. Nine hundred eleven. Yeah, let's he's wow. Well, that's me. So you're yeah, I mean it's amazing. If I think it's also just this right time, right place, because he was just starting to like I'm going to do the stick thing again. Yeah, that's pretty awesome. So how much are you trying, like you say you're doing it with respect, how much you're trying to emulate, or how much you trying to be? I mean you're just naturally sound like it's a similar, well similar vocal, timber, timber dim BURP. But I did have some experience mimicking Tommy's working it again. It was never like a lot of the tribute bench have a guy's trying to sound like somebody right and I was lucky and I just it's just a very similar voice to mine and I've learned look like him and is that you're perfect, but there's little things that, you know, I still I talked to rudy about this alt whords like I I still don't. I've had, you know, I've watched a lot of things on youtube and I have had approximately for vocal lessons in my life and I don't really understand a lot about singing and I interest. I try, as I put in the time, but yeah, I really there's a friend of mine who just moved back to la that's a vocal coach that I want to start working with soon. But there's a lot of things I was going to say. Like I've noticed like singing renegade, if there's sometimes, like, I know, if I have to smile or weren't get more teeth and it to it to right and make the tone more similar and so many new ones. Is the singing that I'd never like I'm hitting it out with brute force now kind of thing. Yeah, yeah, but I've always felt it more like, and this is not a false honesty thing or fishing for compliments, but honestly that I I you probably the same way in some regards. You, when you hear a guy who or anybody who's really singing and you get that goosebumb be kind of thing, it's like, yeah, that's a singer, and I feel like I'm I feel like I'm more a guy who's hitting the notes, you know, and and I don't have that right. You know, you hear this pure expression come out of people, it's like man, well, it's it's tricky as a singer as well, because what we're doing, because what I you know. So when I got the Dwight Eigg like I've saying my whole life. But this is a country GIG for one, and it's the high singing part that I'm not. I've only I only kind of maybe within a few years of getting the GIG, had kind of figured out my own voice because I was more of a you know, a low tenor and I did a lot of RNB. I wasn't the rock singer. I wasn't a rock guy, you know, more than Sinatra. Was Closer to what I'm good and now here I am on on this country gig with a grammy winning singer. Yeah, you know, and it's me and him most of the night just singing, you know it, and he likes it mixed where it's almost a do wet, you know, and we're doing buck owens and brow haggard and all this classic stuff. And like I remember one time we were playing at Billy Bob's in Fort Worth and I walked in and we were we were in a hurry and and we just had to get changed because the show was starting and as someone was in our dressing room and I'm like what's going on, and we kind of held up for a second and I see the tour manager clear in the crowd and like okay, cool, and and he's leading out Randy Travis and I'm a dressing you from the dressway like Oh yeah, okay, cool. You know, it's great. You know. We get on stage and we're starting to show and I look over on my side stage and Randy Travis is sitting right there, ten feet from me, and Dwight Itgam's right there and I'm singing in between two of the most iconic country singers and I'm just like how did I get here? But when I was, I was making is like in Condo, staying with you. You're singing, I'm singing parts that are on the record. I'm singing harmonies that are that I'm kind of assigned right. You know, most of the guy like Dwight, on the other hand, is singing songs that were meant for his voice, yet are in his key, you know, and and and are truly from him. So that expression and those goosebumps come from him. I'm I'm like a utility. Got Your and you aren't. You're out front, but you're also just singing a song that's that was meant for someone else's voice. Yes, and that's the kind of difference between...

...like creation and imitation in a way where, yeah, like you said, you're hitting all the you're fulfilling that role and hitting the notes, and but you can, like I said, I try to do it as much passion and try to put myself into the right that role, but ultimately, yeah, it's you're singing what was written by somebody else for their own voice, and I've seen it on Youtube. I haven't seen you guys live, but I mean it's because you're always working. I'm a busy do the best experience, best excuse there is, but I've seen it on youtube much today, all day long. All Day Long, I've been watching you and it's amazing, but it probably didn't feel like it's so what you're what you're expressing, is what it feels like. It's not how it comes across, I'm sure right. You know, you sound great. That's you. You know. Obviously the songs are great. You you fit into that role perfectly. It is a dream. I mean it's a dream Gig for me. It really is in every way and I just feel completely blessed and fortunate and all the guys in the band are really great players and great human beings. It's almost, you know, put his shine and everything like it's like it's it's really that way. Yeah, no, that's amazing. So are there any tricks or so what do you do to keep your voice in shape when you're when you're out on the road? Well, first of all, do you do? You guys go out for a long periods of time or that's kind of hounded back every week or it's a good point. It's basically weekend warrior stuff. You know, a typically there was one crazy month. It was a great month of crazy in a way, probably the six seven years ago, where we had I was gone twenty six days, about a month, and that's never happening like that before. But typically I leave, fly out on Thursday and home on Sunday. Can usually play Friday Saturdays and it's yeah, we do about sixty five shows a year and sometimes be three smelled one, you know. But when I'm not playing with Dennis, if I've a weekend free them playing a local gate with Adrian doing acoustic stuff and right, but I have there's a vocal coach like a name names that Jamie Vanderia. Absolutely he's he's he's an instructor that I fall online and he has this warm up, of course, oh cool, and I have that. It's like eight minute exercises. And then it's another fantastic coach, Ken Tamplin, and he has another these are you know, his is free on youtube. I do those two exercises every single day. Oh Cool, and whether I'm singing or have a GIG or not, it just and it's just one of those things where I'm sort of do it by road after a while, but it's and in the other is the head addage about, you know, it's not practice makes perfect, it's perfect practice makes person, and so I'm doing these exercises and I don't know if I'm actually doing myself any favors of this point. So today, that's why I'm really starting to look. I've got to find, yeah, get some new help and some well, I do have a guy actually got his name from Rudy as well. quit and I won because I was where I was kind of leading to. Is Like I had to take some lessons and I've Sung my whole life and right and have records out, you know, but it was the same thing, because I feel like it was the same feeling to like when I got on the Gig I was like, Oh, this is like really a singing gig. It's really a singing period, like the bass parts. It's country music. It's pretty simple. It's not Autemala, you know, and anyway it's is pretty simple. It's really about the vocals, and so I'm going to have to be great, you know. And for me too, was like I was I was in an instrumental band for years on the road and I could party my ass off all night long and is not care. I could go, I could be hungover as I wanted to be and still play. The voice is not that. That's I had to start taking care of myself in a whole different way. And and Dennis is real big on the same thing. Like you're saying that this band is all about the vocals. Is Anybody can play these guitar parts and play that? It's like it's got to be. And remember the first time I whatever it was right. I had a couple I've lost my woice a couple times in last ten years, word for a week, or so, but we're sometimes we luckily, I think two of the three gigs ride trouble too. Of more corporate gigs and we just had Dennis do more songs or one time Craig saying renegade. That's kind of cool. But the very first Gig we did there was a they had like in these swag bags were just called entertainers secrets, little spray. HMMM, well, Texi eat on it right, right, oh, this is great. I'm like, I feel great and it's so I'd bring it to every Gig and and then it's when I was like what do you think that does for you? And I'm like, I think I could fly. It's it's artificial, but if I believe, it'll right. Right, but the first time I was struggling, he pulled me aside. Went time he's like is because I know you hear your brother was here last night. You guys had some beers after the show because you get your alcohol draw you out. You know, it's he said, you know, we got to start. Learned to play chess or something. You got to start. You know, the end of the show, you got to go back to your room. And it's like, yeah, he said the life of a singer is at the life of living without yeah, and you know he doesn't smoke or drink and he's very careful what he eats all the time. And at the end of the day, you know, I'm a side guy for the large part and it's not my name on the on the bill, and not that I don't know that I respect it any less, right, but there's less pressure on me. It's right and I feel like if you know, if I could only sing three songs, we'd still be fine. But I still want to live my life.

But you know, the older I get to it's like I realized that I can't eat some of the I remember, you know, when a buddy of mind turned forty and he was like, Oh man, I can't eat pepperoni pizzas anymore. Like suck to get old. Right now, there's things like I find if I could like I I went and got scoped one time about maybe six years ago, and I saving some issues. M Ayah, they came out and they said, well, the good news, you don't have nodes. I mean I had I'm an old phone, or I'd played for you driving to this out in Glendale, I think, and I said this is my before you know, I'm driving and seeing to my phone. It's like and the mid it sounds like a fact machine. It's like just terrible and I was terrified and then I'm yeah, so you don't have notes, but you do have a lot of acid reflect damage. M He's and I was shocked to hear that. I know my dad used have really bad gird and he's you stopped me when I'm wrong. I said, you do like red wine? Like yeah, because you do. You like spicy food? Yeah, like tomato, base food. Yeah, I eat a lot of chocolate. Well, not that much, I'll hit because well, three out of four. Yeah, and he said, you know, I don't know, he scared me. It put it's like if you're going to do this, and he I had some kind of an acid prescription of the time. I used for like a month and then I've been taking apple side or vinegar. Religiously interesting. Yeah, it's like an especially if I know I'm going to be having a certain kind of food. It's spicy food. So I love Italian food and I can't drink the Quila for any gigs and there's things that just you have to be careful. and they said red wine is bad for if it's meet in particular. But right put the fear in me. It's like you said that that'll affect your chords for two weeks. Oh, yeah, so it's like when I you know, I'm a different person when I know gigs are coming, and it's like I try to be more careful. Yeah, and if no GIG, I'm not that careful. Yeah, yeah, I hear that too. Yeah, well, I yeah, I can't. I don't drink coffee anymore. I can't do that. I've had to give it you, though. I don't even drink caffeine when I'm on the road, just because, like any little thing, wow, I feel like I need to be so in my head, needs to be so in the game once I hit that stage for you in real quick, very like, is there anybody else in the band that could take your parts, if not the high stuff? And that's that's the thing that I that's critical. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, yeah, and so I gotta, I gotta be there, you know. And we're about the same. We go out usually only weekends. It's like three to four shows a week, two to four shows, but for a while it was four shows every week. Yeah, but again, I'm like so out of what I normally think of as my range that it's like that stuff wears out faster. And the travel and no hotels all it's yeah, they are conditioning and everything, man, every good ton of water in them. Yeah, yeah, definitely. And then the no sleep to because I don't know how you guys traveled. So if we're on the bust and it's you know, you have a four or five hour drive, you maybe you get some sleep, then you wake up and you go to the hotel and I'm can't get back to sleep for a couple hours and then I get another four or five hours sleep there and all together it's like, you know, nine or eight or ten hours. But what it is. So everything you can do to keep yourself healthy. You know, that's another thing that I've been fortunate with was, you know it in the ten years plus are doing this now, I'd I've been on a I think I've been on a bus three nights. Oh Wow, we fly everywhere. And then if it's if it's a routing issue of you know, a hundred and fifty miles or over three hundred miles and we rent cars and drive that that leg of it, you know. But got you and so you're also Tommy Shaw, so you're fronting the band, like when you're you're not just okay, throw them a song, you're like you got a front it. Yes, that kind of intimidating at first as well. Absolutely, and and you know, I still think I've probably said hit ten words to the crowd and in ten years. And because I've ever done to saying. You know, you're not that comfortable with it, are you with the speaking part? I said now, because that's well, I'll tell you what to say. And then he never did. Ha, ha ha. And you know, I know he expects you to talk to and no, not remy', just like you say song and say him a good nightmare. Yes, and it's a point. Now. It's like, I mean I I started thinking I want to start watching like Arnell and I want to Kelly Hanson. That's an amazing job. And with in foreigner, because I just I can't imagine my cell act. It'd say, yeah, this next song, Cristal Bob, we wop this back and seventy's like none of these songs are mine. So how do I? I could say this is my favorite song, or it's like it's just how do you make it sound real cool? Yeah, it's a thing that's another thing too. It's not you're now. You're an entertainer, you're not just a good player. Yeah, and that's this last twenty nine weeks of I mean I'm fronting this that I'm the only person talking or singing all night, which takes soul to on the voice, for sure. But there's well, I'm got a you know, a hundred, fifty three and people out there. It's like I don't see any of them. Yeah, it's it's going to be some confidence. I don't know if it's silling to translate. I think it will write. And it's more comfortable being me now. And Yeah, we have to find who you are too on stage and find your character right playing so that you're not recessarily having to be you. You know, you're like this is who I'm on stage age.

People have always told me to. It's like, you know, your guitars, you're binkie. It's like it's like Clark Kennon, Superman. It's like if I've got the guitar on, I and I you know, I run around. I have if I'm on stage at people are so you look like you're so happy. That's like that's my happy place. That's my family are on stage and right it I'm playing songs that none of the I don't want to sound dismissal, but none of the songs in that in their catalog are incredibly difficult on guitar. Right, it's and, but it's always about running back and getting me back to your microphone and Tart and right. But, but it is a lot of chords. Yeah, there's a lot to remember. I was in boss sticks for about right, right while, you know, so I'm very familiar and there's a lot to remember. It might not be difficult, but it's lots good to get and that's the funny thing to it's every when I got the Gig at the drummer that I'd play with in the in the Boston of the sticks tribute. It's like now you're playing the same songs, you know, as you've already been playing these almost as long as Denis has. Not Quite right. Right, but, but, but, you know, if the guitars in front of me, I feel like I've got this special power and I've got a barrier, you know, take it off. I'm like this, all of us, that's for sure. And it's like you got to get out there and do it. Yeah, yeah, that's another thing that Rudy. We kept talking about Rudy because because we're going to get to why. Right, right, rudy re caught it in us. That has been on the show ready. But he's great at that. He's a front man, you know, in fact too good, because you know even when he's just out at your house, he's got to be from Mr Front. He's on it now. He's great, but but yeah, he's he's the guy to take lessons from on. That, I would think, is yeah, it's intimidating when you know we're both. I'm a bass player and that's even bigger, a great covered up even more. And I also was listening to his two latest records, like one just came out in May. Yes, from it. Yeah, it was a thrill to awesome. We didn't get to write with him, which is kind of disappointing, right, but you know, guys in the band are on every track. I think I'm singing on almost every song. I'm playing guitar on Sam and just you know, was there with him tracking stuff. It's like me and Dennis Jim Peter around a microphone singing like this is pretty cool, is it? Awesome. And there's one one of the rock sounds like starts with just singing and he goes, just give me like the like those ten or be scream right here because you're in there. That's yeah. Well, the record is great. It's very sticks man. Yes, it's. It's old school lately. So cool man and his voice. I mean there's there's some things live to where it's like you sound better than you did when you recorded that thirty five years ago. I know it's nose in came as, like, how old is he? He's seventy three. Seventy three. I mean that record sounds the same as it would if it yeah, Oh man, that big first single, east of midnight, it's like that. Just that sounds we could have been on grand illusion. Yeah, exactly, great tune. And what's the other one? With all due respect, yes, check that one out. Yeah, very cool. Well, we keep bringing up Rudy and because we did it all did a record together and called waiting funny, with a band called waiting for Monday, and so we should probably talk about that a little bit because it's still on itunes. That's in still on spotify. You know, that's a kind of the cool thing about putting out a record now, even if it's out, like my record. I haven't even done one in ten years, but it's still up. It's not like that's out of print. Right, I mean right, go get it and this out. This record is not that old. It's still pretty new. But February, February fourteen, which I mean it seems like. I'm like, that was this year, right. Yeah, Oh, man, it seems like last year to me. Incredible. Well, it's because it took like five years to make. No, I don't know. It didn't take five rate, but it took a long time. It took five, five weeks and thirteen dollars. But how did all that come about? Because it really started with you. It really comes down to it's again a kind of a network thing thing, who you know and all that. And and good buddy of mine, Jeff Scott Soto, he's been with frontiers for you, Hunter off, for almost thirty years. Phenomenal singer, a good friend of mine, and he was was in journey for a minute. Yes, yeah, and he's saying it. He was in a friend of ingveay's band when he was like seventeen. Wow, and then he's done a lot of it. A Long Solo career. He was in journey for one tour. He's currently been with sons of Apollo for the last couple of years and the guy still has incredible range after singing for, you know, very some years. But he was taking on kind of an AR role for frontiers looking for new talent and he's like hey, you know, I think we can, we can do something with you, because would you want to do a solo record? And expecting me to say yeah, there's vent, and I'm like, well, let me think about it. I don't really think about the dream man. You're getting signed if it's here, sign here. And now you're the guitar player, you're the probably the bass player. I've can...

...never get played drumas like you. You're the singer, you the songwriter, you you dose it, you do the album art, you do with the all that everything. I'm like, I'm not that guy. I've always been tribal in a way. It's like I want my five guys. MMM. And you know, even again back to the tribute things, it's like sometimes you we rehearse on like Tuesday nights. Wherever was you have seven to ten some place in some small room and loud and sweat it out right. But my wife would see these songs are thirty years old. You've been playing it for twenty years. Why didn't you practice them? I'm like, it's I just want to make loud noise of my buddies. And right it's it's a tarttle packet, you know, US against the world. So that I said, I, you know, I don't think I maybe I could do something with somebody else. And and he said, well, I'm going to pitch rudy to them too, and he said that when they heard, I think it's the album that you did with Rudy. You do you produced for really pretty stand co wrote, yeah, record, and my understanding is at then they say, well, we like this. Put Him with August and they didn't know that we had played in. I have been in that journey tribute bean off right a couple of years together, and so he and I were both like, yeah, I would love to work together. We've been talking about it for years off and on, and this kind of was that and that that said, well, we'll work together, well, we'll do this, will sign this deal whatever. And of course, Rudy, I knew you as well. But Rudy had known you for years and worked with you and you bring down only the base and vocal but the production and songwriting aspect to it right, and so we would said we can do this thing. And from my perspective, I'll say this or and Rudy, a member, telling me when day. It's like, you know, I'm the laziest guy in the world. I was like, I don't know, super talented guy and it'll tell you. So he told me that Rust Ray from the horse's mouth. It sets. But I remember having a conversation one day, probably maybe even when Jeff was ever, like what, what do you foresee for the lineup? And you know, even when it's just do a Soto things like. Well, I would I definitely want to have I don't play keyboards at all. I could play chords by you know, it's like, right, I don't want to be like a s rock. You know I love that music, but right, I don't want to be very completely one dimensional about it. Right, I want to have a you know, different options. And I knew Walter from jam night, basically, right Walter. You know, Walter email tie instrumentalist, incredible talent. That to the extent I wasn't even fully aware until I having worked in this record together. But Rudy said world, you know, do you have a guy to mind for like that utility guy? Like absolutely, so, Walter's that guy and and rudy had done something with him recently also and he said that'd be perfect. HMM. So we got Walter involved in. Walter brought an immediate sense of focus to everything we're so he is a studio owner as well, right, and he works really fast where we'd throw an idea and be like okay, well, these guy he's got a demo like as we're sitting there discussing it, right, and we got a lot of things to done in a hurry. But you know, you had done a lot of the early writing with Rudy and I brought some things in there, a lot of collaborations or some you know, some songs that was for the most part done and well run, and some soldom sail. Basically, yeah, I got the GIG and took off and like I literally have the conversation with Rudy too, because, you know, he was like yeah, you can just write all this stuff and produce it and like it's like great, this is going to be awesome. And then I was like I can't do it, man. I you know, I'm happy to write and like what did what I've bad could and when I just had to bail just as Walter was kind of coming in. So it just all worked out. You know. Well, you were there for the we've done one live Gig, right, yeah, and you really if that I did. We had the whiskey and that I you know, if I can do whatever I can do, I still want to do. Yeah, because the great songs. I am super proud of the record. Yeah, you know, and I said record. There's old guys talking again and you know, we're like, we're saying it's available on itunes and it's out there. And I brought Eric to copies of the CD to I couldn't even get one because either I'm just now getting it, but you know, covid happened and no one seen anybody. So it's like, yeah, pretty trippy, but it's a really solid record. Yeah, and and you did some of the writing to, obviously, and like was this your first time writing stuff? For first time getting anything I'd written on to, you know, on to record. I YEA major label recording I guess it. Tons of demos over the years of things and I'd sang on some, just played on some, written with people, all that, but nothing ever went anywhere. You got you. Yeah, so very exciting in that regard for sure. Yeah, I hadn't really thought about that, did you. Did you find it? Did it come easy? Did you find that you kind of found your voice as a rider? Or I mean, obviously it's just one project, but I would see a so that in mind, I would say no, not yet. I'm still sorry, still exploring. But there were you know, this happens with everybody every project that they're involved in. Sure, but I remember one of the big things for me was when Rudy and I had our first meeting with the label and driving home at night I remember him...

...singing would end up turning into pick your lies, because at the time it was something else, but hit had that the coorse melody right and everything. That's that sounds really killer. And then got home and I just went walked in the House and grabbed this one guitar and, whatever reason, through a capable on the seventh thread and just started playing these chords and I had, within like a few five minutes I think I had a demo on my phone of the would turn into shattered lives, and that was one where it's like it was fun to have something I wrote ninety percent of right away, in an inspired moment, right and I had in my head this is going to be. I wanted this to be like remember how the working till I was MOFA for a long time. Yeah, because when I put it together I thought this is going to be Rudy's going to crush this vocal and it's going to become like mother father to us, who I'll make journey fans you would about being a direct rip off of anything. It's like definitely inspired by and with a few tweaks, we got that arrangement together and I remember for me one of the most fun stories of doing this project. I got to walters one time, I think it was probably a guitar day maybe, but some overdubs to do on that, on that song, and he said, did you hear the vocal yet? Like none, and then rudy got there but before we were going to play it, and he goes, we even heard this yet, because I'm really kind of nervous, you know, and so he stood behind me while I fired it up on the big speakers and yeah, I was so blown away I really literally had tears at the end of the song and like maybe knocked it out of the park. It's like and to have and one hand it's kind of like talking about the roles we're in with with Dwight and Dennis, where you're you're playing, you're fulfilling a role of woman. It was kind of similar. It's like, yeah, I presented this music, but it's not a song until the vocal melody of the pay it's like right, and it's like wow, I because because I don't want to do something wrong with your baby, I wanted to be riding and I just couldn't be more proud of the way had song turned out. Well, that's so great. One thing that back to van Halen, against like a very good friend of mine. You have to shoot him. To Alice Trada. Yeah, just brilliant guitar player. In fact, he was playing with Davealy Roth on the most recent tour before covid right. He had. He actually replaced me in the journey tribute band when I got the Dennis Gig. He and re telling you his he learned the set and like, you know, two days notes or something came in play so much better than me. was like, but he's a brilliant player. He was in van he on tribute for years and he's got all that stuff down down. Cole every though, another Guy van he ha on tribute. Now he's playing with Ye David exactly. It's pretty crazy. And I was talking to him about the record when after it had been mastered and I think I gave him a couple tracks listen to and and I said man, the other weird to see. He goes, I hope there's a lot of you this on there, but that I got see. You know what, there's there's only one song on. They where my you know, where I do any kind of tapping at all. He's like, Oh, I hope is at least some phase ninety on there at Sid in the big anything right now? Well, actually, they added one in you know when Andy and he's are coming. A good friend of mine that that mixed the record, that he added one post to atoms, one section because I needed a little little letty. Yeah, I got a phase n idea my pedal board Nice. We're on a base to absolutely I don't know. Vocal and there's a shatters lives talking about that. The lyrics a little bit like that's kind of a deep message to in that song. Yeah, and you know, Rudy wasn't aware of he told me earlier on we we first kind of had, you know, that spark of the idea for him is I want to make it something about mental health, but a lot and kind of approach it in unbeknownst to him, you know. And hopefully I get through. This good buddy of mine committed suicide and so it became became very personal to me and you know, when we did the video I'm wearing one of his shirts and video and and it's one of the its. It's like that silent. It's reminds me that, you know, it's the saying here all the time. It's like everybody out there's dealing with something right. So for you let your anger on on some for some traffic situation or somebody cuts you off here. That's like, you know, anybody, somebody could be at their last nerve. You know, are that right? And but you know it's it's funny how we celebrate. We give more weight, if you will, to like celebrity lives and it's right. But because I was going to say we've lost a lot of been portant. Everyone's important, right, but the high profile situations, I could in music we've had, you know, Chris Cornell and gesture Benington recently, and then Robin, Robin Williams, I think was kind of where Rudy was focusing for histial inspiration. MMM. But yeah, I'd it's a terrible situation and people, I understand that, you know, it's give us helps a phone call away, but friends off and won't reach out and there's there's like the we put the national suicide of wearing his hot hotline number, I think, in the video. And right, you know, it's a big issue right now. Again, yes, with the lockdown and everything, it's you know, now people are more isolated. So it's a you know, it's a pretty...

...relevant song. Yeah, it's it's true, where there's a you think about can't even imagine. We talked about one of the things were first starting up with the lockdown. It's like imagine if you had a new roommate or a new boyfriend, girlfriend, who wife, husband? Right, it's like our imagine if you're alone. Yeah, I'm sure I'd be talking to myself with even three weeks, three minutes maybe. Yeah, I talk myself now, right, exa. Sorry, I don't know, but you know, you think about the things like, you know, spousal abuse or or child abuse or pad abuse, that kind of thing. Right, things are it's easily exacerbated by this. Yeah, just amplifies all of this. Sust you also does cool intro to end of a dream that me and rudy, that song mostly, and then when I finally heard the mix, like Oh, let's yeah, that's awesome. It's funny. That's written specifically for that. Or did you know that? Pretty we were kind of knocking things around and and I think it's I think it's probably Walter's idea. Actually said I feel like there should be like an intro to this piece, and and we were sitting there to study where just e minor, just guitar players thing, and and we're knocked a few things around. I'm like, well, we'll come back to it, right, and then I went home and I remembered I wrote this piece. I've been playing guitar for like a year and I think I was listening to a lot of like Alex Liveson from rush and Steve How from yes and just kind of it's not a very difficult piece, but it's like I was trying to find something that sounded classical to my young ears. You know, right, it's and I had this whole section and just never I would played all the time, like to myself. You know, I've never forgot about it's like hey, it's I might have a home here. So I played it on the phone that night and sent it to wallaching us. This is great. I think we can definitely use this and put it on there. And and then we interviewing against the outro to and it's it's a cool section. Some people of like people on Youtube, comments, well, that that sounds terrible. They have the like that. What's all that? It's low fide and his popping. It's like it's supposed to sound like that. We try to make its but you know, it's like it's a that's it's really cool. Yeah, it was on Denis Dans record. I it's right, that's right. But yeah, that was fun because it's you know, sometimes you come for these little sections. That's part of the joy of songwriting collaborations. You were like yeah, I've got this great verse and it was nowhere. Right. Well, I've got this bridge, all right, anything. Yeah, absolutely, well, it sounds amazing. It's like bookends the whole thing. And Yeah, it may get also gives it this sort of dreamy thing. Is called the end of a dream, but it's right the dreamy vibe. So and that was a funny thing that frontiers, when we were talking about which song to do videos for and that was one of them they want to do, and they hit sent us a couple of like mid s journey videos where, you they're all wearing like white polyester and and it's just so funny. And and Neil has, I think he was playing like a acoustic was on a gracie stand right. And then and the frontier skys like we yeah, we were envisioned seeing this, you know. And and August could be they called August could have a sling like what? We're definitely not dressing like that. It's like the no, no, we just did the vibe of this pray. It's got a probably that here it's frontiers records and an Italian label. Correct. So that's that. And Dennis is is on that label and almost pretty much I don't think sticks is any but pretty much every band that from the S, yeah, s nine, it's still working. Ninety percent of them are on frontiers. So, yeah're keeping rock music alive absolutely. Yeah, yeah, like Rick Springfield to yeah, not just heavy way rock stuff. You know, it's it's pretty great. It's pretty cool and Dennis was super supportive of this record. Yes, and...

...it's kind of cool. He one of the things. So he we play here, when I know him as Dennis now and the first name base, I start a young you know, we play the song is like before the concert. Are On the way out. We always always puts in one of our songs in there and that's so cool. And we're asking was again. Of course. That's really neat that he allows to you ever apprehensive about telling him or a little bit? Yeah, because it's not all. Not every artist is gonna write. Want that to happen, you know, and he's always been so encouraged, encouraging to all of us in the band. To you, it's like, you know, one level, it's like, you know, if you ever get a bigger, better offer him got, I want to hold you back. It's like I love you, but you know, I'll find someone else right and he well, I remember reading email from him too. I think it was where he got kind of gave some feedback on the record. Yeah, which is really just really did it and cool. And one point he was like out, you know, I'm I don't have a time, but I wish, I wish I would produce this for you. And it's like yeah, and there was especially that, you know, the song found you. Now that the there's two versions on the record, of course, and I've been doing the acoustic one in my shows too. Yeah, I actually, you know, I don't sing this on the record and Rudy sings a lot bet a I do, but this is kind of give you an idea of it. A lot of people from the show have bought the record now and the record the CD or downloaded or something. Yeah, but there's the full blown version of the song. You know, it's pretty much Walter's baby, that song. But he was like this song sounds like it came out of the Jonathan Kane playbook. You, I see you guys are going forward. And he was like yeah, all they said it's criminal the end section that the out are the WHO, because why are the net words they're. That's because Hook of the song is when you guys doing and he were at the airport and he's like all on, he walks away. Well, that was it. Aaron has just chewed me out about his songs. Rice. It's already done, we can't write it. COMES BACK LIKE FM TIM inside. He's like my w I went to stand because I got the scores for you to you guys me. Here's the title level. I'm like, and I didn't act like this is so weird, but wow, I mean he was going to be wanted to fix the song. That's it. That's really cool, though. So from you know, your life has been pretty incredible from a kid from Alaska and when you look back, like you your arm was hurt and you started learning that guitar, did you ever kind of imagine that this is where it was going to end up? Never at all, and that's you know, somebody you know told me recently. It's like again, because I tend to dog myself alot on those Friday shows. I get upset about not sounding great on something where I agree on something and and say that's you think backed when you know. Could you ever imagined when you first started playing guitar it, you'd be where you are now and talking about this and having the experience that you have a playing with somebody you grew up listening to and not idolizing specifically, but you know, it's like again with Eddie passing recently, it's like we came up at a certain time when it's like if you had posters on your wall of rock bands and these guys were you know they were there. Were like superheroes in a way. They do. Yeah, and it turns out of funny later as you when you're thirteen and somebody's twenty, it seems like you don't realize they're thirty years later. There you're almost the same age, but right it seem like there's so much older it right exactly. Just incredible to have some of the experience I've had in to meet some of the people that they would say we we don't often like the Boston thing was been. We've really gone out on the road toured with but we have, you know, had lots of bands open for us over the years and we've opened for some other bigger bands, sick heart, for example. I come some mine. We just done several shows with Pat Benatar and cool blue oyster called, I'm mottled Rick Springfield, but three especial. I haven't that missing somebody. I can't think it right now. But Anyway, the point I was going to make was the first time I met neil girl, though we have been at tar afterwards. Your arm managers like you gotta stop being such a fan boy with these people. Treat them like my peers. I said, Hey, he's not, I'm not his peer. Right's kidding me. It's like wow, but the thing about it is that everybody I've met in these bands that that are, you know, Rock Stars to me, and it legitimately, you know. Yeah, I've not had a single instance yet of somebody who was a jerk at all. Yeah, you know, everyone's been so I get the feeling that people are grateful that you, Dennis says is sometimes so. It's like if I don't know, you know, people be coming to pay money and...

...see me sing these songs thirty years later. Yeah, out of written in a lower key, for one, but it's like I think they just feel grateful that they're people still care, all right, will come out and support them still. Yeah, they're they're very gracious about it. Yeah, I love that. Yeah, it's so great. I actually we did a show with thirty eight special and it ended up at the bar with them afterwards. And who those guys are? Rock Stars and you know well, man, it's been such an awesome time. It's very cool hangs around and thanks for telling me all your stories and I'm I know there's tons more and this is I'm driving like I forgot to say this, but it's really a pleasure talking to you in so thanks for being on the show. Absolutely, Man, my pleasure and look forward to hearing which you added out of this exactly now. Stand for that beer. Yes, let's do it. I'd like to say in defense of me not practicing eight hours a day during college is that eventually I had to catch up with all that stuff that I had kind of halfassed in college. My first kind of Jazz, Contemporary Jazz, smooth jazz if you will, Gig was Nelson Ranchel, Sax player from Denver, and I remember getting that Gig and I had just got done playing in a blues band for years before that, maybe six or seven years, and different blues bands, and to go from that to play in lines and playing jazz and and playing really difficult technical music was quite a shock to the system. It brought me right back to Berkeley and my brain and thought, wow, maybe I should have put in those eight hours. So eventually I had to do that, you know. So really what I did was just delayed that. But eventually it had to put in the eight hours or the tenzero hours or whatever figure you think it's appropriate or you use as your goal, and it will catch up to you. So there's no getting out of the work, you know what I mean, and that's what I think a lot of people will spend a lot of time trying to avoid the work and that's not going to really serve you in the end. I also loved when he said he had talked to a friend who said he could find the one thing and any song that he liked enough to get through it. And I've often said that I don't have the luxury of always playing the music that I like, you know, and I think this is a really good technique in getting through those overplayed songs or the ones that you don't enjoy hearing. You know, I think that's something I kind of come to naturally as well, to get to get through because, you know, the end of the day, it's all music and there's got to be something you can enjoy about everything, even if it's brown eyed girl. Every single night there's a bass solo in that song. At least. Gi t is a college here in Los Angeles. In it stands for a Guitar Institute of Technology, and eventually they added like Vocal Institute of Technology, VI T and bass, you know, Bi t, and so on, so overth now it's all just called Ami Musicians Institute and not am I t, which is what I refer to it as. That's a really smart college. In Massachusetts, the atomic punks is a van Halen tribute band and they're still out there doing it. They're awesome. Check them out. Rock Star was the movie that we were talking about. Is the movie of a guy who got gets discovered on Youtube and becomes the lead singer of his favorite rock band. Chuck Pinazzo is the Bass player for sticks and gird. I had to look up gird. It stands for a gastro esophageal reflux disease and it's a digestive disorder that affects the ring of muscles between your esophagus and your stomach. So there you have it. You learned all kinds of things on the dive Bar Rockstar podcast and I hope you enjoyed learning those things. Star, Wow, you've made it to the end. I'm hoping it's because you completely enjoyed yourself and are now filled with knowledge and inspiration to move forward with your dreams. If that is the case, and you would like to stay informed of new episodes, live events in general news, please go to dive Bar Rock starcom and sign up for the mailing list. If you have any questions, comments, corrections or complaints about anything you here on the show, please email me at fan mail at dive Bar Rockstarcom and you may even end up on the show. We at the dive Bar Rockstar podcast with all of our hearts. Thank you for listening and remember, it's all about dreams.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (32)